Search results for '*Spatial Perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Craig French (forthcoming). Object Seeing and Spatial Perception. In Fiona MacPherson, Martine Nida-Rümelin & Fabian Dorsch (eds.), Phenomenal Presence.score: 240.0
    I consider the way in which spatial perception is necessary for object seeing. In section 1 I outline the operative conception of object seeing. I consider Cassam’s view that in order to see o, you must see it as spatially located (section 2). I argue that Cassam’s argument is unsound. Cassam’s argument relies on the claim that seeing o requires visual differentiation. But it is not the case that seeing o requires visual differentiation. This is because the following principle (...)
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  2. Rick Grush (2007). Skill Theory V2.0: Dispositions, Emulation, and Spatial Perception. Synthese 159 (3):389 - 416.score: 234.0
    An attempt is made to defend a general approach to the spatial content of perception, an approach according to which perception is imbued with spatial content in virtue of certain kinds of connections between perceiving organism's sensory input and its behavioral output. The most important aspect of the defense involves clearly distinguishing two kinds of perceptuo-behavioral skills—the formation of dispositions, and a capacity for emulation. The former, the formation of dispositions, is argued to by the central pivot of (...)
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  3. Simon Prosser (2011). Affordances and Phenomenal Character in Spatial Perception. Philosophical Review 120 (4):475-513.score: 228.0
    Intentionalism is the view that the phenomenal character of a conscious experience is wholly determined by, or even reducible to, its representational content. In this essay I put forward a version of intentionalism that allows (though does not require) the reduction of phenomenal character to representational content. Unlike other reductionist theories, however, it does not require the acceptance of phenomenal externalism (the view that phenomenal character does not supervene on the internal state of the subject). According the view offered here, (...)
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  4. [deleted]Elisa Raffaella Ferre, Matthew Longo, Federico Fiori & Patrick Haggard (2013). Vestibular Modulation of Spatial Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 228.0
    Vestibular inputs make a key contribution to the sense of one’s own spatial location. While the effects of vestibular stimulation on visuo-spatial processing in neurological patients have been extensively described, the normal contribution of vestibular inputs to spatial perception remains unclear. To address this issue, we used a line bisection task to investigate the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on spatial perception, and on the transition between near and far space. Brief left-anodal and right-cathodal GVS or right-anodal (...)
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  5. Gary Hatfield (1991). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz. Cambridge: MIT Press.score: 204.0
    Gary Hatfield examines theories of spatial perception from the seventeenth to the nineteenth century and provides a detailed analysis of the works of Kant and...
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  6. Soonja Choi & Kate Hattrup (2012). Relative Contribution of Perception/Cognition and Language on Spatial Categorization. Cognitive Science 36 (1):102-129.score: 192.0
    This study investigated the relative contribution of perception/cognition and language-specific semantics in nonverbal categorization of spatial relations. English and Korean speakers completed a video-based similarity judgment task involving containment, support, tight fit, and loose fit. Both perception/cognition and language served as resources for categorization, and allocation between the two depended on the target relation and the features contrasted in the choices. Whereas perceptual/cognitive salience for containment and tight-fit features guided categorization in many contexts, language-specific semantics influenced categorization where (...)
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  7. J. Scott Jordan (1997). Spatial Perception is Contextualized by Actual and Intended Deictic Codes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (4):750-751.score: 180.0
    Ballard et al. model eye position as a deictic pointer for spatial perception. Evidence from research on gaze control indicates, however, that shifts in actual eye position are neither necessary nor sufficient to produce shifts in spatial perception. Deictic context is instead provided by the interaction between two deictic pointers; one representing actual eye position, and the other, intended eye position.
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  8. Gary Hatfield (1984). Spatial Perception and Geometry in Kant and Helmholtz. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1984:569 - 587.score: 174.0
    This paper examines Helmholtz's attempt to use empirical psychology to refute certain of Kant's epistemological positions. Particularly, Helmholtz believed that his work in the psychology of visual perception showed Kant's doctrine of the a priori character of spatial intuition to be in error. Some of Helmholtz's arguments are effective, but this effectiveness derives from his arguments to show the possibility of obtaining evidence that the structure of physical space is non-Euclidean, and these arguments do not depend on his theory (...)
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  9. A. Tanesini (forthcoming). Spatial Attention and Perception: Seeing Without Paint. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-22.score: 174.0
    Covert spatial attention alters the way things look. There is strong empirical evidence showing that objects situated at attended locations are described as appearing bigger, closer, if striped, stripier than qualitatively indiscernible counterparts whose locations are unattended. These results cannot be easily explained in terms of which properties of objects are perceived. Nor do they appear to be cases of visual illusions. Ned Block has argued that these results are best accounted for by invoking what he calls ‘mental paint’. In (...)
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  10. [deleted]Jeanine K. Stefanucci Sarah H. Creem-Regehr, Kyle T. Gagnon, Michael N. Geuss (2013). Relating Spatial Perspective Taking to the Perception of Other's Affordances: Providing a Foundation for Predicting the Future Behavior of Others. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 174.0
    Understanding what another agent can see relates functionally to the understanding of what they can do. We propose that spatial perspective taking and perceiving other’s affordances, while two separate spatial processes, together share the common social function of predicting the behavior of others. Perceiving the action capabilities of others allows for a common understanding of how agents may act together. The ability to take another’s perspective focuses an understanding of action goals so that more precise understanding of intentions may result. (...)
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  11. Jacob Beck (1965). Apparent Spatial Position and the Perception of Lightness. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (2):170.score: 168.0
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  12. Norman L. Corah (1965). Effects of the Visual Field Upon Perception of Change in Spatial Orientation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):598.score: 168.0
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  13. Jacques Kaswan & Stephen Young (1963). Stimulus Exposure Time, Brightness, and Spatial Factors as Determinants of Visual Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (2):113.score: 168.0
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  14. [deleted]Carolyn Parkinson & Thalia Wheatley (2013). Old Cortex, New Contexts: Re-Purposing Spatial Perception for Social Cognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 162.0
  15. Hans Moravec, Robot Spatial Perception by Stereoscopic Vision and 3d Evidence Grids.score: 156.0
    Very encouraging results have been obtained from a new program that derives a dense three-dimensional evidence grid representation of a robot's surroundings from wide-angle stereoscopic images. The pro gram adds several spatial rays of evidence to a grid for each of about 2,500 local image features chosen per stereo pair. It was used to construct a 256x256x64 grid, representing 6 by 6 by 2 meters, from a hand- collected test set of twenty stereo image pairs of an office scene. Fifty (...)
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  16. Verena Willenbockel, Franco Lepore, Dang Khoa Nguyen, Alain Bouthillier & Frédéric Gosselin (2012). Spatial Frequency Tuning During the Conscious and Non-Conscious Perception of Emotional Facial Expressions – An Intracranial ERP Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 156.0
    Previous studies have shown that complex visual stimuli, such as emotional facial expressions, can influence brain activity independently of the observers’ awareness. Little is known yet, however, about the “informational correlates” of consciousness—i.e., which low-level information correlates with brain activation during conscious vs. non-conscious perception. Here, we investigated this question in the spatial frequency (SF) domain. We examined which SFs in disgusted and fearful facial expressions modulate activation in the insula and amygdala over time and as a function of (...)
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  17. Luciano Boi (2004). Questions Regarding Husserlian Geometry and Phenomenology. A Study of the Concept of Manifold and Spatial Perception. Husserl Studies 20 (3):207-267.score: 150.0
  18. Ned Block (2003). Spatial Perception Via Tactile Sensation. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.score: 150.0
    I’m now looking at a soccer ball and a Nintendo Game Cube, and thus am having a perceptual experience of a sphere and a cube. My friend, blind from birth, (who’s helping me with the cleaning) is touching these items, and is thus having a perceptual experience of the same things. Not only are we perceiving the same items, but in doing so we apply the terms ‘sphere’ and ‘cube’, respectively, to them. Are we, in doing so, applying the same, (...)
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  19. John Campbell (2009). Does Knowledge of Material Objects Depend on Spatial Perception? Comments on Quassim Cassam's the Possibility of Knowledge. Analysis 69 (2):309-317.score: 150.0
  20. Ned Block (2003). Tactile Sensation Via Spatial Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (7):285-286.score: 150.0
  21. Andrew R. Bailey (2007). Spatial Perception, Embodiment, and Scientific Realism. Dialogue 46 (3):553-568.score: 150.0
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  22. Gary Hatfield (2012). Phenomenal and Cognitive Factors in Spatial Perception. In Gary Hatfield & Sarah Allred (eds.), Visual Experience: Sensation, Cognition, and Constancy. Oup Oxford. 35.score: 150.0
  23. Edward Goodwin Ballard (1986). Spatial Perception and Complementarity: Responses to Heelan's Criticism. Research in Phenomenology 16 (1):201-207.score: 150.0
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  24. Zenon Pylyshyn (1989). The Role of Location Indexes in Spatial Perception: A Sketch of the FINST Spatial-Index Model. Cognition 32 (1):65-97.score: 150.0
    Marr (1982) may have been one of the rst vision researchers to insist that in modeling vision it is important to separate the location of visual features from their type. He argued that in early stages of visual processing there must be “place tokens” that enable subsequent stages of the visual system to treat locations independent of what specic feature type was at that location. Thus, in certain respects a collinear array of diverse features could still be perceived as a (...)
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  25. Alison Simmons (2003). Spatial Perception From a Cartesian Point of View. Philosophical Topics 31 (1/2):395-423.score: 150.0
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  26. C. Spearman (1907). An 'Economic' Theory of Spatial Perception. Mind 16 (62):181-196.score: 150.0
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  27. A. Mark Smith (2005). The Alhacenian Account of Spatial Perception and its Epistemological Implications. Arabic Sciences and Philosophy 15 (2):219-240.score: 150.0
  28. Edward Slowik (2004). Hume and the Perception of Spatial Magnitude. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (3):355 - 373.score: 150.0
    This paper investigates Hume's theory of the perception of spatial magnitude or size as developed in the _Treatise, as well as its relation to his concepts of space and geometry. The central focus of the discussion is Hume's espousal of the 'composite' hypothesis, which holds that perceptions of spatial magnitude are composed of indivisible sensible points, such that the total magnitude of a visible figure is a derived by-product of its component parts. Overall, it will be argued that a (...)
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  29. Thomas Ballhausen (2007). Between Virgo and Virago : Spatial Perception and Gender Politics in Austrian Film Production, 1914-1918. In Vera Apfelthaler & Julia Köhne (eds.), Gendered Memories: Transgressions in German and Israeli Film and Theatre. Turia + Kant.score: 150.0
  30. S. P. Fullinwider (1993). The Natural and the Normative: Theories of Spatial Perception From Kant to Helmholtz: Gary Hatfield,(Cambridge, Mass.: MIT Press, 1990), Xii+ 366 Pp. ISBN 0-262-08086-9 Cloth $35.00. [REVIEW] Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 24 (3):485-491.score: 150.0
  31. John Campbell (2007). What's the Role of Spatial Awareness in Visual Perception of Objects? Mind and Language 22 (5):548–562.score: 144.0
    I set out two theses. The first is Lynn Robertson’s: (a) spatial awareness is a cause of object perception. A natural counterpoint is: (b) spatial awareness is a cause of your ability to make accurate verbal reports about a perceived object. Zenon Pylyshyn has criticized both. I argue that nonetheless, the burden of the evidence supports both (a) and (b). Finally, I argue conscious visual perception of an object has a different causal role to both: (i) non-conscious (...) of the object, and (ii) experience, e.g. hallucination, that may be subjectively indiscriminable from, but is not, perception of the object. (shrink)
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  32. Aude Oliva Timothy F. Brady (2012). Spatial Frequency Integration During Active Perception: Perceptual Hysteresis When an Object Recedes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 144.0
    As we move through the world, information about objects moves to different spatial frequencies. How the visual system successfully integrates information across these changes to form a coherent percept is thus an important open question. Here we investigate such integration using hybrid faces, which contain different images in low and high spatial frequencies. Observers judged how similar a hybrid was to each of its component images while walking towards or away from it or having the stimulus moved towards or away (...)
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  33. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.score: 138.0
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  34. [deleted]Elizabeth B. Gross & Dennis Proffitt (2013). The Economy of Social Resources and its Influence on Spatial Perceptions. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 130.0
  35. Yue Chen (2003). Spatial Integration in Perception and Cognition: An Empirical Approach to the Pathophysiology of Schizophrenia. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (1):86-87.score: 126.0
    Evidence for a dysfunction in cognitive coordination in schizophrenia is emerging, but it is not specific enough to prove (or disprove) this long-standing hypothesis. Many aspects of the external world are spatially mapped in the brain. A comprehensive internal representation relies on integration of information across space. Focus on spatial integration in the perceptual and cognitive processes will generate empirical data that shed light on the pathophysiology of schizophrenia.
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  36. Christian Freksa, Thomas Barkowsky & Alexander Klippel (1999). Spatial Symbol Systems and Spatial Cognition: A Computer Science Perspective on Perception-Based Symbol Processing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):616-617.score: 126.0
    People often solve spatially presented cognitive problems more easily than their nonspatial counterparts. We explain this phenomenon by characterizing space as an inter-modality that provides common structure to different specific perceptual modalities. The usefulness of spatial structure for knowledge processing on different levels of granularity and for interaction between internal and external processes is described. Map representations are discussed as examples in which the usefulness of spatially organized symbols is particularly evident. External representations and processes can enhance internal representations and (...)
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  37. S. Lehar (1996). Interaction of Lightness, Brightness, and Form Perception Requires a Spatial Reconstruction of the Perceived Configuration. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 137-137.score: 126.0
     
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  38. Maria Talero (2005). Perception, Normativity, and Selfhood in Merleau-Ponty: The Spatial 'Level' and Existential Space. Southern Journal of Philosophy 43 (3):443-461.score: 120.0
  39. Fabiano Botta, Juan Lupiáñez & Ana B. Chica (2014). When Endogenous Spatial Attention Improves Conscious Perception: Effects of Alerting and Bottom-Up Activation. Consciousness and Cognition 23:63-73.score: 120.0
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  40. Terry Regier & Laura A. Carlson (2001). Grounding Spatial Language in Perception: An Empirical and Computational Investigation. Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 130 (2):273.score: 120.0
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  41. [deleted]Gross Joachim (2011). Neural Dynamics of Anticipatory Spatial Attention and its Influence on Perception: The Role of Alpha-Band Modulations in the Dorsal and Ventral Visual Streams. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 120.0
  42. V. S. Ramachandran (1975). High Spatial Frequencies Dominate Perception. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 6 (6):611-612.score: 120.0
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  43. Michael Swanston (1994). Spatial Motion Perception Requires the Perception of Distance. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 17 (2):334.score: 120.0
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  44. Uj Bucher, Fw Mast & N. Bischof (1991). Distortions in the Perception of Spatial Axes. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):487-487.score: 120.0
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  45. Marlene Johansson Falck (2012). From Perception of Spatial Artefacts to Metaphorical Meaning. In L. Filipovic & K. M. Jaszczolt (eds.), Space and Time in Languages and Cultures: Language, Culture, and Cognition. John Benjamins.score: 120.0
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  46. [deleted]Farzin Faraz (2009). Spatial Resolution of Visual Perception in 6- to 15-Month-Old Infants. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 120.0
  47. Masahiro Hirai & Kazuo Hiraki (2006). The Relative Importance of Spatial Versus Temporal Structure in the Perception of Biological Motion: An Event-Related Potential Study. Cognition 99 (1):B15-B29.score: 120.0
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  48. [deleted]Veronica Montani, Andrea Facoetti & Marco Zorzi (2014). Spatial Attention in Written Word Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 120.0
  49. Eric L. Schwartz (1985). Local and Global Functional Architecture in Primate Striate Cortex: Outline of a Spatial Mapping Doctrine for Perception. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 146--157.score: 120.0
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  50. Robert B. Welch (1989). A Comparison of Speech Perception and Spatial Localization. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):776.score: 120.0
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