Search results for '*Speech Perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Casey O'Callaghan (forthcoming). Speech Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford.score: 246.0
    Is speech special? This paper evaluates the evidence that speech perception is distinctive when compared with non-linguistic auditory perception. It addresses the phenomenology, contents, objects, and mechanisms involved in the perception of spoken language. According to the account it proposes, the capacity to perceive speech in a manner that enables understanding is an acquired perceptual skill. It involves learning to hear language-specific types of ethologically significant sounds. According to this account, the contents of perceptual experience when listening (...)
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  2. Oded Ghitza (2011). Linking Speech Perception and Neurophysiology: Speech Decoding Guided by Cascaded Oscillators Locked to the Input Rhythm. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 240.0
    The premise of this study is that current models of speech perception, which are driven by acoustic features alone, are incomplete, and that the role of decoding time during memory access must be incorporated to account for the patterns of observed recognition phenomena. It is postulated that decoding time is governed by a cascade of neuronal oscillators, which guide template-matching operations at a hierarchy of temporal scales. Cascaded cortical oscillations in the theta, beta and gamma frequency bands are argued (...)
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  3. Leonardo Badino, Alessandro D'Ausilio, Luciano Fadiga & Giorgio Metta (2014). Computational Validation of the Motor Contribution to Speech Perception. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):461-475.score: 240.0
    Action perception and recognition are core abilities fundamental for human social interaction. A parieto-frontal network (the mirror neuron system) matches visually presented biological motion information onto observers' motor representations. This process of matching the actions of others onto our own sensorimotor repertoire is thought to be important for action recognition, providing a non-mediated “motor perception” based on a bidirectional flow of information along the mirror parieto-frontal circuits. State-of-the-art machine learning strategies for hand action identification have shown better performances (...)
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  4. Alexis Bosseler, Samu Taulu, Elina Pihko, Jyrki Mäkelä, Toshiaki Imada, Antti Ahonen & Patricia Kuhl (2013). Theta Brain Rhythms Index Perceptual Narrowing in Infant Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants’ initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the worlds’ languages narrows—native discrimination increases while nonnative discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4-8Hz), reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech (...)
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  5. Fernando Orphão de Carvalho (2009). On a Supposed Dogma of Speech Perception Research: A Response to Appelbaum (1999). Principia 13 (1):93-103.score: 240.0
    In this paper we purport to qualify the claim, advanced by Appelbaum (1999) that speech perception research, in the last 70 years or so, has endorsed a view on the nature of speech for which no evidence can be adduced and which has resisted falsification through active ad hoc “theoretical repair” carried by speech scientists. We show that the author’s qualms on the putative dogmatic status of speech research are utterly unwarranted, if not misconstrued as a whole. On more (...)
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  6. Lisa Kilman, Adriana A. Zekveld, Mathias Hällgren & Jerker Rönnberg (forthcoming). The Influence of Non-Native Language Proficiency on Speech Perception Performance. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 240.0
    The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish) and non-native (English) speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. (...)
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  7. David Poeppel Oded Ghitza, Anne-Lise Giraud (2012). Neuronal Oscillations and Speech Perception: Critical-Band Temporal Envelopes Are the Essence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 240.0
    A recent opinion article (Neural oscillations in speech: don’t be enslaved by the envelope. Obleser et al., 2012) questions the validity of a class of speech perception models inspired by the possible role of neuronal oscillations in decoding speech (e.g., Ghitza 2011, Giraud & Poeppel 2012). They criticize, in particular, what they see as the over-emphasis of the role of temporal speech envelope information, and the over-emphasis of entrainment to the input rhythm while neglecting the role of top-down processes (...)
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  8. A. J. Shahin (2010). Neurophysiological Influence of Musical Training on Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 2:126-126.score: 240.0
    Does musical training affect our perception of speech? For example, does learning to play a musical instrument modify the neural circuitry for auditory processing in a way that improves one’s ability to perceive speech more clearly in noisy environments? If so, can speech perception in individuals with hearing loss, who struggle in noisy situations, benefit from musical training? While music and speech exhibit some specialization in neural processing, there is evidence suggesting that skills acquired through musical training for (...)
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  9. Léo Varnet, Kenneth Knoblauch, Fanny Meunier & Michel Hoen (2013). Using Auditory Classification Images for the Identification of Fine Acoustic Cues Used in Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:865.score: 240.0
    An essential step in understanding the processes underlying the general mechanism of perceptual categorization is to identify which portions of a physical stimulation modulate the behavior of our perceptual system. More specifically, in the context of speech comprehension, it is still a major open challenge to understand which information is used to categorize a speech stimulus as one phoneme or another, the auditory primitives relevant for the categorical perception of speech being still unknown. Here we propose to adapt technique (...)
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  10. Karsten Specht (2013). Mapping a Lateralization Gradient Within the Ventral Stream for Auditory Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 240.0
    Recent models on speech perception propose a dual stream processing network, with a dorsal stream, extending from the posterior temporal lobe of the left hemisphere through inferior parietal areas into the left inferior frontal gyrus, and a ventral stream that is assumed to originate in the primary auditory cortex in the upper posterior part of the temporal lobe and to extend towards the anterior part of the temporal lobe, where it may connect to the ventral part of the inferior (...)
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  11. Matthew Winn, Ariane Rhone, Monita Chatterjee & William Idsardi (2013). The Use of Auditory and Visual Context in Speech Perception by Listeners with Normal Hearing and Listeners with Cochlear Implants. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 234.0
    There is a wide range of acoustic and visual variability across different talkers and different speaking contexts. Listeners with normal hearing accommodate that variability in ways that facilitate efficient perception, but it is not known whether listeners with cochlear implants can do the same. In this study, listeners with normal hearing (NH) and listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) were tested for accommodation to auditory and visual phonetic contexts created by gender-driven speech differences as well as vowel coarticulation and lip (...)
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  12. Irene Appelbaum (1998). Fodor, Modularity, and Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 11 (3):317-330.score: 228.0
    Fodor argues that speech perception is accomplished by a module. Typically, modular processing is taken to be bottom-up processing. Yet there is ubiquitous empirical evidence that speech perception is influenced by top-down processing. Fodor attempts to resolve this conflict by denying that modular processing must be exclusively bottom-up. It is argued, however, that Fodor's attempt to reconcile top-down and modular processing fails, because: (i) it undermines Fodor's own conception of modular processing; and (ii) it cannot account for the (...)
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  13. Irene Appelbaum (1999). The Dogma of Isomorphism: A Case Study From Speech Perception. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):S250-S259.score: 228.0
    In this paper I provide a metatheoretical analysis of speech perception research. I argue that the central turning point in the history of speech perception research has not been well understood. While it is widely thought to mark a decisive break with what I call "the alphabetic conception of speech," I argue that it instead marks the entrenchment of this conception of speech. In addition, I argue that the alphabetic conception of speech continues to underwrite speech perception (...)
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  14. J. D. Trout (2001). Metaphysics, Method, and the Mouth: Philosophical Lessons of Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):261-291.score: 228.0
    This paper advances a novel argument that speech perception is a complex system best understood nonindividualistically and therefore that individualism fails as a general philosophical program for understanding cognition. The argument proceeds in four steps. First, I describe a "replaceability strategy", commonly deployed by individualists, in which one imagines replacing an object with an appropriate surrogate. This strategy conveys the appearance that relata can be substituted without changing the laws that hold within the domain. Second, I advance a "counterfactual (...)
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  15. Daniel Mirman, James L. McClelland, Lori L. Holt & James S. Magnuson (2008). Effects of Attention on the Strength of Lexical Influences on Speech Perception: Behavioral Experiments and Computational Mechanisms. Cognitive Science 32 (2):398-417.score: 210.0
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  16. Meghan Sumner, Seung Kyung Kim, Ed King & Kevin B. McGowan (2014). The Socially Weighted Encoding of Spoken Words: A Dual-Route Approach to Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 210.0
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  17. D. V. Cross, H. L. Lane & W. C. Sheppard (1965). Identification and Discrimination Functions for a Visual Continuum and Their Relation to the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (1):63.score: 210.0
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  18. Dominic W. Massaro (1989). Multiple Book Review of Speech Perception by Ear and Eye: A Paradigm for Psychological Inquiry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):741.score: 210.0
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  19. Colin Phillips (2001). Levels of Representation in the Electrophysiology of Speech Perception. Cognitive Science 25 (5):711-731.score: 210.0
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  20. Annelie Tuinman Holger Mitterer (2012). The Role of Native-Language Knowledge in the Perception of Casual Speech in a Second Language. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 204.0
    Casual speech processes, such as /t/-reduction, make word recognition harder. Additionally, word-recognition is also harder in a second language (L2). Combining these challenges, we investigated whether L2 learners have recourse to knowledge from their native language (L1) when dealing with casual-speech processes in their L2. In three experiments, production and perception of /t/-reduction was investigated. An initial production experiment showed that /t/-reduction occurred in both languages and patterned similarly in proper nouns but differed when /t/ was a verbal inflection. (...)
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  21. Christopher Mole (2009). The Motor Theory of Speech Perception. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 198.0
    There is a long‐standing project in psychology the goal of which is to explain our ability to perceive speech. The project is motivated by evidence that seems to indicate that the cognitive processing to which speech sounds are subjected is somehow different from the normal processing employed in hearing. The Motor Theory of speech perception was proposed in the 1960s as an attempt to explain this specialness. The first part of this essay is concerned with the Motor Theory's explanandum. (...)
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  22. Lars Marstaller & Hana Burianová (forthcoming). The Multisensory Perception of Co-Speech Gestures – A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 198.0
    Co-speech gestures constitute a unique form of multimodal communication because here the hand movements are temporally synchronized with speech, specifically with prosody, i.e., the rhythm and intonation of speech. Behavioral studies show that listeners utilize the coordination of gesture movements together with prosodic features of speech to improve language comprehension. Neuroimaging studies provide further evidence that the perception of a certain type of co-speech gesture, so-called beat gestures, which have long been suspected to relate to phonological units beyond the (...)
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  23. James T. Townsend Nicholas Altieri (2011). An Assessment of Behavioral Dynamic Information Processing Measures in Audiovisual Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 192.0
    Research has shown that visual speech perception can assist accuracy in identification of spoken words. However, little is known about the dynamics of the processing mechanisms involved in audiovisual integration. In particular, architecture and capacity, measured using response time methodologies, have not been investigated. An issue related to architecture concerns whether the auditory and visual sources of the speech signal are integrated “early” or “late”. We propose that “early” integration most naturally corresponds to coactive processing whereas “late” integration corresponds (...)
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  24. Irene Appelbaum (1998). Analytic Isomorphism and Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):748-749.score: 180.0
    The suggestion that analytic isomorphism should be rejected applies especially to the domain of speech perception because (1) the guiding assumption that solving the lack of invariance problem is the key to explaining speech perception is a form of analytic isomorphism, and (2) after nearly half a century of research there is virtually no empirical evidence of isomorphism between perceptual experience and lower-level processing units.
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  25. Richard Shillcock (2000). Interaction, Function Words, and the Wider Goals of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):346-346.score: 180.0
    We urge caution in generalising from content words to function words, in which lexical-to-phonemic feedback might be more likely. Speech perception involves more than word recognition; feedback might be outside the narrow logic of word identification but still be present for other purposes. Finally, we raise the issue of evidence from imaging studies of auditory hallucination.
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  26. Jörgen Pind (1998). Merits of a Gibsonian Approach to Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):279-280.score: 180.0
    Neurobiologically inspired theories of speech perception such as that proposed by Sussman et al. are useful to the extent that they are able to constrain such theories. If they are simply intended as suggestive analogies, their usefulness is questionable. In such cases it is better to stick with the Gibsonian approach of attempting to isolate invariants in speech and to demonstrate their role for the perceiver in perceptual experiments.
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  27. Bruno Galantucci, Carol A. Fowler & M. T. Turvey (2001). Event Coding as Feature Guessing: The Lessons of the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):886-887.score: 180.0
    The claim that perception and action are commonly coded because they are indistinguishable at the distal level is crucial for theories of cognition. However, the consequences of this claim run deep, and the Theory of Event Coding (TEC) is not up to the challenge it poses. We illustrate why through a brief review of the evidence that led to the motor theory of speech perception.
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  28. Howard C. Nusbaum, Jeremy I. Skipper & Steven L. Small (2001). A Sensory-Attentional Account of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):995-996.score: 180.0
    Although sensorimotor contingencies may explain visual perception, it is difficult to extend this concept to speech perception. However, the basic concept of perception as active hypothesis testing using attention does extend well to speech perception. We propose that the concept of sensorimotor contingencies can be broadened to sensory-attentional contingencies, thereby accounting for speech perception as well as vision.
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  29. Hanna S. Gauvin, Robert J. Hartsuiker & Falk Huettig (2013). Speech Monitoring and Phonologically-Mediated Eye Gaze in Language Perception and Production: A Comparison Using Printed Word Eye-Tracking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 180.0
  30. Bob McMurray & David Gow (2005). It's Not How Many Dimensions You Have, It's What You Do with Them: Evidence From Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):31-31.score: 180.0
    Contrary to Pothos, rule- and similarity-based processes cannot be distinguished by dimensionality. Rather, one must consider the goal of the processing: what the system will do with the resulting representations. Research on speech perception demonstrates that the degree to which speech categories are gradient (or similarity-based) is a function of the utility of within-category variation for further processing.
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  31. Riitta Hari Lotta Hirvenkari, Veikko Jousmäki, Satu Lamminmäki, Veli-Matti Saarinen, Mikko E. Sams (2010). Gaze-Direction-Based MEG Averaging During Audiovisual Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 180.0
    To take a step towards real-life-like experimental setups, we simultaneously recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals and subject’s gaze direction during audiovisual speech perception. The stimuli were utterances of /apa/ dubbed onto two side-by-side female faces articulating /apa/ (congruent) and /aka/ (incongruent) in synchrony, repeated once every 3 s. Subjects (N = 10) were free to decide which face they viewed, and responses were averaged to two categories according to the gaze direction. The right-hemisphere 100-ms response to the onset of the (...)
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  32. Dominic W. Massaro (1998). Integrating Cues in Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):275-275.score: 174.0
    Sussman et al. describe an ecological property of the speech signal that is putatively functional in perception. An important issue, however, is whether their putative cue is an emerging feature or whether the second formant (F2) onset and the F2 vowel actually provide independent cues to perceptual categorization. Regardless of the outcome of this issue, an important goal of speech research is to understand how multiple cues are evaluated and integrated to achieve categorization.
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  33. Irwin Miller (1957). Perception of Nonsense Passages in Relation to Amount of Information and Speech-to-Noise Ratio. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (6):388.score: 168.0
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  34. Ibrahima Giroux & Arnaud Rey (2009). Lexical and Sublexical Units in Speech Perception. Cognitive Science 33 (2):260-272.score: 162.0
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  35. Danny D. Steinberg (1969). Natural Class, Complementary Distribution, and Speech Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (2p1):195.score: 162.0
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  36. Gregory Hickok & Bradley Buchsbaum (2003). Temporal Lobe Speech Perception Systems Are Part of the Verbal Working Memory Circuit: Evidence From Two Recent fMRI Studies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):740-741.score: 156.0
    In the verbal domain, there is only very weak evidence favoring the view that working memory is an active state of long-term memory. We strengthen existing evidence by reviewing two recent fMRI studies of verbal working memory, which clearly demonstrate activation in the superior temporal lobe, a region known to be involved in processing speech during comprehension tasks.
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  37. Stephen Grossberg (2000). Brain Feedback and Adaptive Resonance in Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):332-333.score: 156.0
    The brain contains ubiquitous reciprocal bottom-up and top-down intercortical and thalamocortical pathways. These resonating feedback pathways may be essential for stable learning of speech and language codes and for context-sensitive selection and completion of noisy speech sounds and word groupings. Context-sensitive speech data, notably interword backward effects in time, have been quantitatively modeled using these concepts but not with purely feedforward models.
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  38. J. Merrill, D. Sammler, M. Bangert, D. Goldhahn, G. Lohmann, R. Turner & A. D. Friederici (2011). Perception of Words and Pitch Patterns in Song and Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3:76-76.score: 156.0
    This fMRI study examines shared and distinct cortical areas involved in the auditory perception of song and speech at the level of their underlying constituents: words, pitch and rhythm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on the brain activity patterns of six conditions, arranged in a subtractive hierarchy: sung sentences including words, pitch and rhythm; hummed speech prosody and song melody containing only pitch patterns and rhythm; as well as the pure musical or speech rhythm. Systematic contrasts between these (...)
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  39. O. Skljarov (1996). Workshop on the Auditory Basis of Speech Perception. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview.score: 156.0
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  40. Antje S. Meyer & Willem J. M. Levelt (2000). Merging Speech Perception and Production. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):339-340.score: 150.0
    A comparison of Merge, a model of comprehension, and WEAVER, a model of production, raises five issues: (1) merging models of comprehension and production necessarily creates feedback; (2) neither model is a comprehensive account of word processing; (3) the models are incomplete in different ways; (4) the models differ in their handling of competition; (5) as opposed to WEAVER, Merge is a model of metalinguistic behavior.
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  41. Gregory Hickok & David Poeppel (2000). Towards a Functional Neuroanatomy of Speech Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):131-138.score: 150.0
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  42. Karsten Specht, Florian Baumgartner, Jörg Stadler, Kenneth Hugdahl & Stefan Pollmann (2014). Functional Asymmetry and Effective Connectivity of the Auditory System During Speech Perception is Modulated by the Place of Articulation of the Consonant- A 7T fMRI Study. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 150.0
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  43. Lyn Frazier (1983). Motor Theory of Speech Perception or Acoustic Theory of Speech Production? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):213.score: 150.0
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  44. Lee H. Wurm & Douglas A. Vakoch (2000). The Adaptive Value of Lexical Connotation in Speech Perception. Cognition and Emotion 14 (2):177-191.score: 150.0
  45. Lori L. Holt Andrew J. Lotto, Gregory S. Hickok (2009). Reflections on Mirror Neurons and Speech Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):110.score: 150.0
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  46. Jeffrey S. Bowers & Colin J. Davis (2004). Is Speech Perception Modular or Interactive? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 8 (1):3-5.score: 150.0
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  47. Denis Burnham (1999). Perceiving Talking Faces: From Speech Perception to a Behavioral Principle by Dominic W. Massaro. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (12):487-488.score: 150.0
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  48. Delphine Dahan, Sarah J. Drucker & Rebecca A. Scarborough (2008). Talker Adaptation in Speech Perception: Adjusting the Signal or the Representations? Cognition 108 (3):710-718.score: 150.0
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  49. Chris Davis & Jeesun Kim (2006). Audio-Visual Speech Perception Off the Top of the Head. Cognition 100 (3):B21-B31.score: 150.0
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  50. Emmanuel Dupoux, Vincent de Gardelle & Sid Kouider (2008). Subliminal Speech Perception and Auditory Streaming. Cognition 109 (2):267-273.score: 150.0
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