Search results for '*Speech Perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Casey O'Callaghan (forthcoming). Speech Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford.score: 93.0
    Is speech special? This paper evaluates the evidence that speech perception is distinctive when compared with non-linguistic auditory perception. It addresses the phenomenology, contents, objects, and mechanisms involved in the perception of spoken language. According to the account it proposes, the capacity to perceive speech in a manner that enables understanding is an acquired perceptual skill. It involves learning to hear language-specific types of ethologically significant sounds. According to this account, the contents of perceptual experience when listening (...)
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  2. Alexis Bosseler, Samu Taulu, Elina Pihko, Jyrki Mäkelä, Toshiaki Imada, Antti Ahonen & Patricia Kuhl (2013). Theta Brain Rhythms Index Perceptual Narrowing in Infant Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants’ initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the worlds’ languages narrows—native discrimination increases while nonnative discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4-8Hz), reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech (...)
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  3. Fernando Orphão de Carvalho (2009). On a Supposed Dogma of Speech Perception Research: A Response to Appelbaum (1999). Principia 13 (1):93-103.score: 90.0
    In this paper we purport to qualify the claim, advanced by Appelbaum (1999) that speech perception research, in the last 70 years or so, has endorsed a view on the nature of speech for which no evidence can be adduced and which has resisted falsification through active ad hoc “theoretical repair” carried by speech scientists. We show that the author’s qualms on the putative dogmatic status of speech research are utterly unwarranted, if not misconstrued as a whole. On more (...)
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  4. Oded Ghitza (2011). Linking Speech Perception and Neurophysiology: Speech Decoding Guided by Cascaded Oscillators Locked to the Input Rhythm. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 90.0
    The premise of this study is that current models of speech perception, which are driven by acoustic features alone, are incomplete, and that the role of decoding time during memory access must be incorporated to account for the patterns of observed recognition phenomena. It is postulated that decoding time is governed by a cascade of neuronal oscillators, which guide template-matching operations at a hierarchy of temporal scales. Cascaded cortical oscillations in the theta, beta and gamma frequency bands are argued (...)
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  5. Lisa Kilman, Adriana A. Zekveld, Mathias Hällgren & Jerker Rönnberg (forthcoming). The Influence of Non-Native Language Proficiency on Speech Perception Performance. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 90.0
    The present study examined to what extent proficiency in a non-native language influences speech perception in noise. We explored how English proficiency affected native (Swedish) and non-native (English) speech perception in four speech reception threshold (SRT) conditions including two energetic (stationary, fluctuating) and two informational (two-talker babble Swedish, two-talker babble English) maskers. Twenty-three normal-hearing native Swedish listeners participated, age between 28 and 64 years. The participants also performed standardized tests in English proficiency, non-verbal reasoning and working memory capacity. (...)
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  6. David Poeppel Oded Ghitza, Anne-Lise Giraud (2012). Neuronal Oscillations and Speech Perception: Critical-Band Temporal Envelopes Are the Essence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 90.0
    A recent opinion article (Neural oscillations in speech: don’t be enslaved by the envelope. Obleser et al., 2012) questions the validity of a class of speech perception models inspired by the possible role of neuronal oscillations in decoding speech (e.g., Ghitza 2011, Giraud & Poeppel 2012). They criticize, in particular, what they see as the over-emphasis of the role of temporal speech envelope information, and the over-emphasis of entrainment to the input rhythm while neglecting the role of top-down processes (...)
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  7. A. J. Shahin (2010). Neurophysiological Influence of Musical Training on Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 2:126-126.score: 90.0
    Does musical training affect our perception of speech? For example, does learning to play a musical instrument modify the neural circuitry for auditory processing in a way that improves one’s ability to perceive speech more clearly in noisy environments? If so, can speech perception in individuals with hearing loss, who struggle in noisy situations, benefit from musical training? While music and speech exhibit some specialization in neural processing, there is evidence suggesting that skills acquired through musical training for (...)
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  8. Karsten Specht (2013). Mapping a Lateralization Gradient Within the Ventral Stream for Auditory Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 90.0
    Recent models on speech perception propose a dual stream processing network, with a dorsal stream, extending from the posterior temporal lobe of the left hemisphere through inferior parietal areas into the left inferior frontal gyrus, and a ventral stream that is assumed to originate in the primary auditory cortex in the upper posterior part of the temporal lobe and to extend towards the anterior part of the temporal lobe, where it may connect to the ventral part of the inferior (...)
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  9. Léo Varnet, Kenneth Knoblauch, Fanny Meunier & Michel Hoen (2013). Using Auditory Classification Images for the Identification of Fine Acoustic Cues Used in Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:865.score: 90.0
    An essential step in understanding the processes underlying the general mechanism of perceptual categorization is to identify which portions of a physical stimulation modulate the behavior of our perceptual system. More specifically, in the context of speech comprehension, it is still a major open challenge to understand which information is used to categorize a speech stimulus as one phoneme or another, the auditory primitives relevant for the categorical perception of speech being still unknown. Here we propose to adapt technique (...)
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  10. Matthew Winn, Ariane Rhone, Monita Chatterjee & William Idsardi (2013). The Use of Auditory and Visual Context in Speech Perception by Listeners with Normal Hearing and Listeners with Cochlear Implants. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 87.0
    There is a wide range of acoustic and visual variability across different talkers and different speaking contexts. Listeners with normal hearing accommodate that variability in ways that facilitate efficient perception, but it is not known whether listeners with cochlear implants can do the same. In this study, listeners with normal hearing (NH) and listeners with cochlear implants (CIs) were tested for accommodation to auditory and visual phonetic contexts created by gender-driven speech differences as well as vowel coarticulation and lip (...)
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  11. Irene Appelbaum (1998). Fodor, Modularity, and Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 11 (3):317-330.score: 84.0
    Fodor argues that speech perception is accomplished by a module. Typically, modular processing is taken to be bottom-up processing. Yet there is ubiquitous empirical evidence that speech perception is influenced by top-down processing. Fodor attempts to resolve this conflict by denying that modular processing must be exclusively bottom-up. It is argued, however, that Fodor's attempt to reconcile top-down and modular processing fails, because: (i) it undermines Fodor's own conception of modular processing; and (ii) it cannot account for the (...)
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  12. Irene Appelbaum (1999). The Dogma of Isomorphism: A Case Study From Speech Perception. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):S250-S259.score: 84.0
    In this paper I provide a metatheoretical analysis of speech perception research. I argue that the central turning point in the history of speech perception research has not been well understood. While it is widely thought to mark a decisive break with what I call "the alphabetic conception of speech," I argue that it instead marks the entrenchment of this conception of speech. In addition, I argue that the alphabetic conception of speech continues to underwrite speech perception (...)
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  13. J. D. Trout (2001). Metaphysics, Method, and the Mouth: Philosophical Lessons of Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):261-291.score: 84.0
    This paper advances a novel argument that speech perception is a complex system best understood nonindividualistically and therefore that individualism fails as a general philosophical program for understanding cognition. The argument proceeds in four steps. First, I describe a "replaceability strategy", commonly deployed by individualists, in which one imagines replacing an object with an appropriate surrogate. This strategy conveys the appearance that relata can be substituted without changing the laws that hold within the domain. Second, I advance a "counterfactual (...)
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  14. Annelie Tuinman Holger Mitterer (2012). The Role of Native-Language Knowledge in the Perception of Casual Speech in a Second Language. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 78.0
    Casual speech processes, such as /t/-reduction, make word recognition harder. Additionally, word-recognition is also harder in a second language (L2). Combining these challenges, we investigated whether L2 learners have recourse to knowledge from their native language (L1) when dealing with casual-speech processes in their L2. In three experiments, production and perception of /t/-reduction was investigated. An initial production experiment showed that /t/-reduction occurred in both languages and patterned similarly in proper nouns but differed when /t/ was a verbal inflection. (...)
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  15. D. V. Cross, H. L. Lane & W. C. Sheppard (1965). Identification and Discrimination Functions for a Visual Continuum and Their Relation to the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (1):63.score: 75.0
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  16. Lars Marstaller & Hana Burianová (forthcoming). The Multisensory Perception of Co-Speech Gestures – A Meta-Analysis of Neuroimaging Studies. Frontiers in Psychology.score: 75.0
    Co-speech gestures constitute a unique form of multimodal communication because here the hand movements are temporally synchronized with speech, specifically with prosody, i.e., the rhythm and intonation of speech. Behavioral studies show that listeners utilize the coordination of gesture movements together with prosodic features of speech to improve language comprehension. Neuroimaging studies provide further evidence that the perception of a certain type of co-speech gesture, so-called beat gestures, which have long been suspected to relate to phonological units beyond the (...)
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  17. Dominic W. Massaro (1989). Multiple Book Review of Speech Perception by Ear and Eye: A Paradigm for Psychological Inquiry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):741.score: 75.0
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  18. Daniel Mirman, James L. McClelland, Lori L. Holt & James S. Magnuson (2008). Effects of Attention on the Strength of Lexical Influences on Speech Perception: Behavioral Experiments and Computational Mechanisms. Cognitive Science 32 (2):398-417.score: 75.0
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  19. Colin Phillips (2001). Levels of Representation in the Electrophysiology of Speech Perception. Cognitive Science 25 (5):711-731.score: 75.0
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  20. Meghan Sumner, Seung Kyung Kim, Ed King & Kevin B. McGowan (2014). The Socially Weighted Encoding of Spoken Words: A Dual-Route Approach to Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 75.0
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  21. Christopher Mole (2009). The Motor Theory of Speech Perception. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press.score: 69.0
    There is a long‐standing project in psychology the goal of which is to explain our ability to perceive speech. The project is motivated by evidence that seems to indicate that the cognitive processing to which speech sounds are subjected is somehow different from the normal processing employed in hearing. The Motor Theory of speech perception was proposed in the 1960s as an attempt to explain this specialness. The first part of this essay is concerned with the Motor Theory's explanandum. (...)
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  22. Hanna S. Gauvin, Robert J. Hartsuiker & Falk Huettig (2013). Speech Monitoring and Phonologically-Mediated Eye Gaze in Language Perception and Production: A Comparison Using Printed Word Eye-Tracking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
  23. James T. Townsend Nicholas Altieri (2011). An Assessment of Behavioral Dynamic Information Processing Measures in Audiovisual Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 66.0
    Research has shown that visual speech perception can assist accuracy in identification of spoken words. However, little is known about the dynamics of the processing mechanisms involved in audiovisual integration. In particular, architecture and capacity, measured using response time methodologies, have not been investigated. An issue related to architecture concerns whether the auditory and visual sources of the speech signal are integrated “early” or “late”. We propose that “early” integration most naturally corresponds to coactive processing whereas “late” integration corresponds (...)
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  24. Irene Appelbaum (1998). Analytic Isomorphism and Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):748-749.score: 60.0
    The suggestion that analytic isomorphism should be rejected applies especially to the domain of speech perception because (1) the guiding assumption that solving the lack of invariance problem is the key to explaining speech perception is a form of analytic isomorphism, and (2) after nearly half a century of research there is virtually no empirical evidence of isomorphism between perceptual experience and lower-level processing units.
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  25. Richard Shillcock (2000). Interaction, Function Words, and the Wider Goals of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):346-346.score: 60.0
    We urge caution in generalising from content words to function words, in which lexical-to-phonemic feedback might be more likely. Speech perception involves more than word recognition; feedback might be outside the narrow logic of word identification but still be present for other purposes. Finally, we raise the issue of evidence from imaging studies of auditory hallucination.
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  26. Bruno Galantucci, Carol A. Fowler & M. T. Turvey (2001). Event Coding as Feature Guessing: The Lessons of the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):886-887.score: 60.0
    The claim that perception and action are commonly coded because they are indistinguishable at the distal level is crucial for theories of cognition. However, the consequences of this claim run deep, and the Theory of Event Coding (TEC) is not up to the challenge it poses. We illustrate why through a brief review of the evidence that led to the motor theory of speech perception.
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  27. Jörgen Pind (1998). Merits of a Gibsonian Approach to Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):279-280.score: 60.0
    Neurobiologically inspired theories of speech perception such as that proposed by Sussman et al. are useful to the extent that they are able to constrain such theories. If they are simply intended as suggestive analogies, their usefulness is questionable. In such cases it is better to stick with the Gibsonian approach of attempting to isolate invariants in speech and to demonstrate their role for the perceiver in perceptual experiments.
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  28. Howard C. Nusbaum, Jeremy I. Skipper & Steven L. Small (2001). A Sensory-Attentional Account of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):995-996.score: 60.0
    Although sensorimotor contingencies may explain visual perception, it is difficult to extend this concept to speech perception. However, the basic concept of perception as active hypothesis testing using attention does extend well to speech perception. We propose that the concept of sensorimotor contingencies can be broadened to sensory-attentional contingencies, thereby accounting for speech perception as well as vision.
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  29. Riitta Hari Lotta Hirvenkari, Veikko Jousmäki, Satu Lamminmäki, Veli-Matti Saarinen, Mikko E. Sams (2010). Gaze-Direction-Based MEG Averaging During Audiovisual Speech Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 60.0
    To take a step towards real-life-like experimental setups, we simultaneously recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals and subject’s gaze direction during audiovisual speech perception. The stimuli were utterances of /apa/ dubbed onto two side-by-side female faces articulating /apa/ (congruent) and /aka/ (incongruent) in synchrony, repeated once every 3 s. Subjects (N = 10) were free to decide which face they viewed, and responses were averaged to two categories according to the gaze direction. The right-hemisphere 100-ms response to the onset of the (...)
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  30. Bob McMurray & David Gow (2005). It's Not How Many Dimensions You Have, It's What You Do with Them: Evidence From Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):31-31.score: 60.0
    Contrary to Pothos, rule- and similarity-based processes cannot be distinguished by dimensionality. Rather, one must consider the goal of the processing: what the system will do with the resulting representations. Research on speech perception demonstrates that the degree to which speech categories are gradient (or similarity-based) is a function of the utility of within-category variation for further processing.
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  31. Irwin Miller (1957). Perception of Nonsense Passages in Relation to Amount of Information and Speech-to-Noise Ratio. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (6):388.score: 60.0
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  32. Dominic W. Massaro (1998). Integrating Cues in Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):275-275.score: 57.0
    Sussman et al. describe an ecological property of the speech signal that is putatively functional in perception. An important issue, however, is whether their putative cue is an emerging feature or whether the second formant (F2) onset and the F2 vowel actually provide independent cues to perceptual categorization. Regardless of the outcome of this issue, an important goal of speech research is to understand how multiple cues are evaluated and integrated to achieve categorization.
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  33. Sung-Joo Lim & Lori L. Holt (2011). Learning Foreign Sounds in an Alien World: Videogame Training Improves Non-Native Speech Categorization. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1390-1405.score: 54.0
    Although speech categories are defined by multiple acoustic dimensions, some are perceptually weighted more than others and there are residual effects of native-language weightings in non-native speech perception. Recent research on nonlinguistic sound category learning suggests that the distribution characteristics of experienced sounds influence perceptual cue weights: Increasing variability across a dimension leads listeners to rely upon it less in subsequent category learning (Holt & Lotto, 2006). The present experiment investigated the implications of this among native Japanese learning English (...)
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  34. John F. Magnotti, Wei Ji Ma & Michael S. Beauchamp (2013). Causal Inference of Asynchronous Audiovisual Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    During speech perception, humans integrate auditory information from the voice with visual information from the face. This multisensory integration increases perceptual precision, but only if the two cues come from the same talker; this requirement has been largely ignored by current models of speech perception. We describe a generative model of multisensory speech perception that includes this critical step of determining the likelihood that the voice and face information have a common cause. A key feature of the (...)
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  35. Oded Ghitza (2012). On the Role of Theta-Driven Syllabic Parsing in Decoding Speech: Intelligibility of Speech with a Manipulated Modulation Spectrum. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Recent hypotheses on the potential role of neuronal oscillations in speech perception propose that speech is processed on multi-scale temporal analysis windows formed by a cascade of neuronal oscillators locked to the input pseudo-rhythm. In particular, Ghitza (2011) proposed that the oscillators are in the theta, beta and gamma frequency bands with the theta oscillator the master, tracking the input syllabic rhythm and setting a time-varying, hierarchical window structure synchronized with the input. In the study described here the hypothesized (...)
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  36. Usha Goswami Alan James Power, Natasha Mead, Lisa Barnes (2012). Neural Entrainment to Rhythmically Presented Auditory, Visual, and Audio-Visual Speech in Children. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Auditory cortical oscillations have been proposed to play an important role in speech perception. It is suggested that the brain may take temporal ‘samples’ of information from the speech stream at different rates, phase-resetting ongoing oscillations so that they are aligned with similar frequency bands in the input (‘phase locking’). Information from these frequency bands is then bound together for speech perception. To date, there are no explorations of neural phase-locking and entrainment to speech input in children. However, (...)
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  37. Lori L. Holt Jingyuan Huang (2012). Listening for the Norm: Adaptive Coding in Speech Categorization. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Perceptual aftereffects have been referred to as “the psychologist’s microelectrode” because they can expose dimensions of representation through the residual effect of a context stimulus upon perception of a subsequent target. The present study uses such context dependence to examine the dimensions of representation involved in a classic demonstration of “talker normalization” in speech perception. Whereas most accounts of talker normalization have emphasized talker-, speech- or articulatory-specific dimensions’ significance, the present work tests an alternative hypothesis: that the long-term (...)
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  38. Gregory Hickok Jonathan Henry Venezia, Kourosh Saberi, Charles Chubb (2012). Response Bias Modulates the Speech Motor System During Syllable Discrimination. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 54.0
    Recent evidence suggests that the speech motor system may play a significant role in speech perception. Repetitive TMS applied to a speech region of premotor cortex impaired syllable identification, while stimulation of motor areas for different articulators selectively facilitated identification of phonemes relying on those articulators. However, in these experiments performance was not corrected for response bias. It is not currently known how response bias modulates activity in these networks. The present fMRI experiment was designed to produce specific, measureable (...)
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  39. J. Merrill, D. Sammler, M. Bangert, D. Goldhahn, G. Lohmann, R. Turner & A. D. Friederici (2011). Perception of Words and Pitch Patterns in Song and Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 3:76-76.score: 54.0
    This fMRI study examines shared and distinct cortical areas involved in the auditory perception of song and speech at the level of their underlying constituents: words, pitch and rhythm. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed on the brain activity patterns of six conditions, arranged in a subtractive hierarchy: sung sentences including words, pitch and rhythm; hummed speech prosody and song melody containing only pitch patterns and rhythm; as well as the pure musical or speech rhythm. Systematic contrasts between these (...)
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  40. Takenobu Murakami, Yoshikazu Ugawa & Ulf Ziemann (2013). Utility of TMS to Understand the Neurobiology of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    According to a traditional view, speech perception and production are processed largely separately in sensory and motor brain areas. Recent psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies provide novel evidence that the sensory and motor systems dynamically interact in speech processing, by demonstrating that speech perception and imitation share regional brain activations. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of these sensorimotor interactions are not completely understood yet. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has often been used in the cognitive neurosciences, including speech research, (...)
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  41. Amélie Rochet-Capellan & Susanne Fuchs (2013). Changes in Breathing While Listening to Read Speech: The Effect of Reader and Speech Mode. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    The current paper extends previous work on breathing during speech perception and provides supplementary material regarding the hypothesis that adaptation of breathing during perception “could be a basis for understanding and imitating actions performed by other people” (Paccalin and Jeannerod, 2000, Brain Research, 862(1-2), p. 194). The experiments were designed to test how the differences in reader breathing due to speaker-specific characteristics, or differences induced by changes in loudness level or speech rate influence the listener breathing. Two readers (...)
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  42. Ulf Ziemann Takenobu Murakami, Yoshikazu Ugawa (2013). Utility of TMS to Understand the Neurobiology of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 54.0
    According to a traditional view, speech perception and production are processed largely separately in sensory and motor brain areas. Recent psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies provide novel evidence that the sensory and motor systems dynamically interact in speech processing, by demonstrating that speech perception and imitation share regional brain activations. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of these sensorimotor interactions are not completely understood yet. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has often been used in the cognitive neurosciences, including speech research, (...)
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  43. Hermann Ackermann Ingo Hertrich, Susanne Dietrich (2013). How Can Audiovisual Pathways Enhance the Temporal Resolution of Time-Compressed Speech in Blind Subjects? Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 51.0
    In blind people, the visual channel cannot assist face-to-face communication via lipreading or visual prosody. Nevertheless, the visual system may enhance the evaluation of auditory information due to its cross-links to (1) the auditory system, (2) supramodal representations, and (3) frontal action-related areas. Apart from feedback or top-down support of, for example, the processing of spatial or phonological representations, experimental data have shown that the visual system can impact auditory perception at more basic computational stages such as temporal resolution. (...)
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  44. Caroline Floccia Alejandrina Cristia, Amanda Seidl, Charlotte Vaughn, Rachel Schmale, Ann Bradlow (2012). Linguistic Processing of Accented Speech Across the Lifespan. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 51.0
    In most of the world, people have regular exposure to multiple accents. Therefore, learning to quickly process accented speech is a prerequisite to successful communication. In this paper, we examine work on the perception of accented speech across the lifespan, from early infancy to late adulthood. Unfamiliar accents initially impair linguistic processing by infants, children, younger adults, and older adults, but listeners of all ages come to adapt to accented speech. Emergent research also goes beyond these perceptual abilities, by (...)
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  45. Alejandrina Cristia, Amanda Seidl, Charlotte Vaughn, Rachel Schmale, Ann Bradlow & Caroline Floccia (2012). Linguistic Processing of Accented Speech Across the Lifespan. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 51.0
    In most of the world, people have regular exposure to multiple accents. Therefore, learning to quickly process accented speech is a prerequisite to successful communication. In this paper, we examine work on the perception of accented speech across the lifespan, from early infancy to late adulthood. Unfamiliar accents initially impair linguistic processing by infants, children, younger adults, and older adults, but listeners of all ages come to adapt to accented speech. Emergent research also goes beyond these perceptual abilities, by (...)
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  46. Ibrahima Giroux & Arnaud Rey (2009). Lexical and Sublexical Units in Speech Perception. Cognitive Science 33 (2):260-272.score: 51.0
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  47. Marc Sato Maëva Garnier, Laurent Lamalle (2013). Neural Correlates of Phonetic Convergence and Speech Imitation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 51.0
    Speakers unconsciously tend to mimic their interlocutor's speech during communicative interaction. This study aims at examining the neural correlates of phonetic convergence and deliberate imitation, in order to explore whether imitation of phonetic features, deliberate, or unconscious, might reflect a sensory-motor recalibration process. Sixteen participants listened to vowels with pitch varying around the average pitch of their own voice, and then produced the identified vowels, while their speech was recorded and their brain activity was imaged using fMRI. Three degrees and (...)
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  48. Danny D. Steinberg (1969). Natural Class, Complementary Distribution, and Speech Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (2p1):195.score: 51.0
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  49. Thomas P. Wilson & Margaret Wilson (2001). Perception-Action Links and the Evolution of Human Speech Exchange. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):47-48.score: 48.0
    A perception-action system may underlie the mechanisms by which human speech exchange in social interaction is managed, as well as the evolutionary precursors of these mechanisms in closely related species. Some phenomena of interaction well-studied by sociologists are suggested as a point of departure for further research.
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  50. Gregory Hickok & Bradley Buchsbaum (2003). Temporal Lobe Speech Perception Systems Are Part of the Verbal Working Memory Circuit: Evidence From Two Recent fMRI Studies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):740-741.score: 48.0
    In the verbal domain, there is only very weak evidence favoring the view that working memory is an active state of long-term memory. We strengthen existing evidence by reviewing two recent fMRI studies of verbal working memory, which clearly demonstrate activation in the superior temporal lobe, a region known to be involved in processing speech during comprehension tasks.
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