Search results for '*Speech Perception' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  67
    Casey O'Callaghan (2015). Speech Perception. In Mohan Matthen (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Perception. Oxford
    Is speech special? This paper evaluates the evidence that speech perception is distinctive when compared with non-linguistic auditory perception. It addresses the phenomenology, contents, objects, and mechanisms involved in the perception of spoken language. According to the account it proposes, the capacity to perceive speech in a manner that enables understanding is an acquired perceptual skill. It involves learning to hear language-specific types of ethologically significant sounds. According to this account, the contents of perceptual experience when listening (...)
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  2.  17
    Leonardo Badino, Alessandro D'Ausilio, Luciano Fadiga & Giorgio Metta (2014). Computational Validation of the Motor Contribution to Speech Perception. Topics in Cognitive Science 6 (3):461-475.
    Action perception and recognition are core abilities fundamental for human social interaction. A parieto-frontal network (the mirror neuron system) matches visually presented biological motion information onto observers' motor representations. This process of matching the actions of others onto our own sensorimotor repertoire is thought to be important for action recognition, providing a non-mediated “motor perception” based on a bidirectional flow of information along the mirror parieto-frontal circuits. State-of-the-art machine learning strategies for hand action identification have shown better performances (...)
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  3.  16
    Fernando Orphão de Carvalho (2009). On a Supposed Dogma of Speech Perception Research: A Response to Appelbaum (1999). Principia 13 (1):93-103.
    In this paper we purport to qualify the claim, advanced by Appelbaum (1999) that speech perception research, in the last 70 years or so, has endorsed a view on the nature of speech for which no evidence can be adduced and which has resisted falsification through active ad hoc “theoretical repair” carried by speech scientists. We show that the author’s qualms on the putative dogmatic status of speech research are utterly unwarranted, if not misconstrued as a whole. On more (...)
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  4.  90
    Irene Appelbaum (1998). Fodor, Modularity, and Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 11 (3):317-330.
    Fodor argues that speech perception is accomplished by a module. Typically, modular processing is taken to be bottom-up processing. Yet there is ubiquitous empirical evidence that speech perception is influenced by top-down processing. Fodor attempts to resolve this conflict by denying that modular processing must be exclusively bottom-up. It is argued, however, that Fodor's attempt to reconcile top-down and modular processing fails, because: (i) it undermines Fodor's own conception of modular processing; and (ii) it cannot account for the (...)
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  5.  50
    Irene Appelbaum (1999). The Dogma of Isomorphism: A Case Study From Speech Perception. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):S250-S259.
    In this paper I provide a metatheoretical analysis of speech perception research. I argue that the central turning point in the history of speech perception research has not been well understood. While it is widely thought to mark a decisive break with what I call "the alphabetic conception of speech," I argue that it instead marks the entrenchment of this conception of speech. In addition, I argue that the alphabetic conception of speech continues to underwrite speech perception (...)
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  6.  22
    J. D. Trout (2001). Metaphysics, Method, and the Mouth: Philosophical Lessons of Speech Perception. Philosophical Psychology 14 (3):261-291.
    This paper advances a novel argument that speech perception is a complex system best understood nonindividualistically and therefore that individualism fails as a general philosophical program for understanding cognition. The argument proceeds in four steps. First, I describe a "replaceability strategy", commonly deployed by individualists, in which one imagines replacing an object with an appropriate surrogate. This strategy conveys the appearance that relata can be substituted without changing the laws that hold within the domain. Second, I advance a "counterfactual (...)
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  7.  7
    Daniel Mirman, James L. McClelland, Lori L. Holt & James S. Magnuson (2008). Effects of Attention on the Strength of Lexical Influences on Speech Perception: Behavioral Experiments and Computational Mechanisms. Cognitive Science 32 (2):398-417.
  8.  2
    Colin Phillips (2001). Levels of Representation in the Electrophysiology of Speech Perception. Cognitive Science 25 (5):711-731.
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  9. Dominic W. Massaro (1989). Multiple Book Review of Speech Perception by Ear and Eye: A Paradigm for Psychological Inquiry. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 12 (4):741.
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  10. D. V. Cross, H. L. Lane & W. C. Sheppard (1965). Identification and Discrimination Functions for a Visual Continuum and Their Relation to the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (1):63.
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  11.  64
    Christopher Mole (2009). The Motor Theory of Speech Perception. In Matthew Nudds & Casey O'Callaghan (eds.), Sounds and Perception: New Philosophical Essays. Oxford University Press
    There is a long‐standing project in psychology the goal of which is to explain our ability to perceive speech. The project is motivated by evidence that seems to indicate that the cognitive processing to which speech sounds are subjected is somehow different from the normal processing employed in hearing. The Motor Theory of speech perception was proposed in the 1960s as an attempt to explain this specialness. The first part of this essay is concerned with the Motor Theory's explanandum. (...)
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  12.  45
    Bob McMurray & David Gow (2005). It's Not How Many Dimensions You Have, It's What You Do with Them: Evidence From Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (1):31-31.
    Contrary to Pothos, rule- and similarity-based processes cannot be distinguished by dimensionality. Rather, one must consider the goal of the processing: what the system will do with the resulting representations. Research on speech perception demonstrates that the degree to which speech categories are gradient (or similarity-based) is a function of the utility of within-category variation for further processing.
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  13.  17
    Irene Appelbaum (1998). Analytic Isomorphism and Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):748-749.
    The suggestion that analytic isomorphism should be rejected applies especially to the domain of speech perception because (1) the guiding assumption that solving the lack of invariance problem is the key to explaining speech perception is a form of analytic isomorphism, and (2) after nearly half a century of research there is virtually no empirical evidence of isomorphism between perceptual experience and lower-level processing units.
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  14.  10
    Richard Shillcock (2000). Interaction, Function Words, and the Wider Goals of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):346-346.
    We urge caution in generalising from content words to function words, in which lexical-to-phonemic feedback might be more likely. Speech perception involves more than word recognition; feedback might be outside the narrow logic of word identification but still be present for other purposes. Finally, we raise the issue of evidence from imaging studies of auditory hallucination.
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  15.  7
    Howard C. Nusbaum, Jeremy I. Skipper & Steven L. Small (2001). A Sensory-Attentional Account of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):995-996.
    Although sensorimotor contingencies may explain visual perception, it is difficult to extend this concept to speech perception. However, the basic concept of perception as active hypothesis testing using attention does extend well to speech perception. We propose that the concept of sensorimotor contingencies can be broadened to sensory-attentional contingencies, thereby accounting for speech perception as well as vision.
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  16.  5
    Jörgen Pind (1998). Merits of a Gibsonian Approach to Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):279-280.
    Neurobiologically inspired theories of speech perception such as that proposed by Sussman et al. are useful to the extent that they are able to constrain such theories. If they are simply intended as suggestive analogies, their usefulness is questionable. In such cases it is better to stick with the Gibsonian approach of attempting to isolate invariants in speech and to demonstrate their role for the perceiver in perceptual experiments.
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  17.  4
    Bruno Galantucci, Carol A. Fowler & M. T. Turvey (2001). Event Coding as Feature Guessing: The Lessons of the Motor Theory of Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):886-887.
    The claim that perception and action are commonly coded because they are indistinguishable at the distal level is crucial for theories of cognition. However, the consequences of this claim run deep, and the Theory of Event Coding (TEC) is not up to the challenge it poses. We illustrate why through a brief review of the evidence that led to the motor theory of speech perception.
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  18. Irene Appelbaum (1995). Speech Perception: A Philosophical Analysis. Dissertation, The University of Chicago
    The overall goal of speech perception research is to explain how spoken language is recognized and understood. In the current research framework it is assumed that the key to achieving this overall goal is to solve the lack of invariance problem. But nearly half a century of sustained effort in a variety of theoretical perspectives has failed to solve this problem. Indeed, not only has the problem not been solved, virtually no empirical candidates for solving the problem have been (...)
     
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  19.  2
    Dominic W. Massaro (1998). Integrating Cues in Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):275-275.
    Sussman et al. describe an ecological property of the speech signal that is putatively functional in perception. An important issue, however, is whether their putative cue is an emerging feature or whether the second formant (F2) onset and the F2 vowel actually provide independent cues to perceptual categorization. Regardless of the outcome of this issue, an important goal of speech research is to understand how multiple cues are evaluated and integrated to achieve categorization.
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  20. Sophie K. Scott & Richard J. S. Wise (2004). The Functional Neuroanatomy of Prelexical Processing in Speech Perception. Cognition 92 (1-2):13-45.
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  21.  2
    Irwin Miller (1957). Perception of Nonsense Passages in Relation to Amount of Information and Speech-to-Noise Ratio. Journal of Experimental Psychology 53 (6):388.
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  22.  9
    Ibrahima Giroux & Arnaud Rey (2009). Lexical and Sublexical Units in Speech Perception. Cognitive Science 33 (2):260-272.
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  23. Gregory Hickok & David Poeppel (2000). Towards a Functional Neuroanatomy of Speech Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (4):131-138.
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  24.  11
    Alvin M. Liberman & Ignatius G. Mattingly (1985). The Motor Theory of Speech Perception Revised. Cognition 21 (1):1-36.
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  25. Dave F. Kleinschmidt & T. Florian Jaeger (2015). Robust Speech Perception: Recognize the Familiar, Generalize to the Similar, and Adapt to the Novel. Psychological Review 122 (2):148-203.
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  26. Antje Heinrich, Helen Henshaw & Melanie A. Ferguson (2015). The Relationship of Speech Intelligibility with Hearing Sensitivity, Cognition, and Perceived Hearing Difficulties Varies for Different Speech Perception Tests. Frontiers in Psychology 6.
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  27. David Jenson, Andrew L. Bowers, Ashley W. Harkrider, David Thornton, Megan Cuellar & Tim Saltuklaroglu (2014). Temporal Dynamics of Sensorimotor Integration in Speech Perception and Production: Independent Component Analysis of EEG Data. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  28. Ryan A. Stevenson, Magali Segers, Susanne Ferber, Morgan D. Barense & Mark T. Wallace (2014). The Impact of Multisensory Integration Deficits on Speech Perception in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  29.  1
    Danny D. Steinberg (1969). Natural Class, Complementary Distribution, and Speech Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 79 (2p1):195.
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  30.  1
    Isabelle Deschamps & Pascale Tremblay (2014). Sequencing at the Syllabic and Supra-Syllabic Levels During Speech Perception: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  31. Kaoru Sekiyama, Takahiro Soshi & Shinichi Sakamoto (2014). Enhanced Audiovisual Integration with Aging in Speech Perception: A Heightened McGurk Effect in Older Adults. Frontiers in Psychology 5.
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  32.  5
    Sofoklis Kakouros & Okko Räsänen (2015). Perception of Sentence Stress in Speech Correlates With the Temporal Unpredictability of Prosodic Features. Cognitive Science 40 (2).
    Numerous studies have examined the acoustic correlates of sentential stress and its underlying linguistic functionality. However, the mechanism that connects stress cues to the listener's attentional processing has remained unclear. Also, the learnability versus innateness of stress perception has not been widely discussed. In this work, we introduce a novel perspective to the study of sentential stress and put forward the hypothesis that perceived sentence stress in speech is related to the unpredictability of prosodic features, thereby capturing the attention (...)
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  33.  15
    Gregory Hickok & Bradley Buchsbaum (2003). Temporal Lobe Speech Perception Systems Are Part of the Verbal Working Memory Circuit: Evidence From Two Recent fMRI Studies. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):740-741.
    In the verbal domain, there is only very weak evidence favoring the view that working memory is an active state of long-term memory. We strengthen existing evidence by reviewing two recent fMRI studies of verbal working memory, which clearly demonstrate activation in the superior temporal lobe, a region known to be involved in processing speech during comprehension tasks.
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  34.  2
    O. Skljarov (1996). Workshop on the Auditory Basis of Speech Perception. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview
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  35.  3
    Stephen Grossberg (2000). Brain Feedback and Adaptive Resonance in Speech Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):332-333.
    The brain contains ubiquitous reciprocal bottom-up and top-down intercortical and thalamocortical pathways. These resonating feedback pathways may be essential for stable learning of speech and language codes and for context-sensitive selection and completion of noisy speech sounds and word groupings. Context-sensitive speech data, notably interword backward effects in time, have been quantitatively modeled using these concepts but not with purely feedforward models.
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  36. Douglas A. Vakoch & Lee H. Wurm (1997). Emotional Connotation in Speech Perception: Semantic Associations in the General Lexicon. Cognition and Emotion 11 (4):337-349.
  37. Joanne L. Miller & Peter W. Jusczyk (1989). Seeking the Neurobiological Bases of Speech Perception. Cognition 33 (1-2):111-137.
  38.  9
    James L. McClelland, Daniel Mirman & Lori L. Holt (2006). Are There Interactive Processes in Speech Perception? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (8):363-369.
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  39.  18
    Bob McMurray, Kristine A. Kovack-Lesh, Dresden Goodwin & William McEchron (2013). Infant Directed Speech and the Development of Speech Perception: Enhancing Development or an Unintended Consequence? Cognition 129 (2):362-378.
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  40.  13
    Bob McMurray & Richard N. Aslin (2005). Infants Are Sensitive to Within-Category Variation in Speech Perception. Cognition 95 (2):B15-B26.
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  41.  8
    Andrew J. Lotto, Gregory S. Hickok & Lori L. Holt (2009). Reflections on Mirror Neurons and Speech Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):110-114.
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  42.  9
    Lori L. Holt Andrew J. Lotto, Gregory S. Hickok (2009). Reflections on Mirror Neurons and Speech Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 13 (3):110.
  43.  52
    Holger Mitterer & Mirjam Ernestus (2008). The Link Between Speech Perception and Production is Phonological and Abstract: Evidence From the Shadowing Task. Cognition 109 (1):168-173.
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  44. Bharath Chandrasekaran, Kristin Van Engen, Zilong Xie, Christopher G. Beevers & W. Todd Maddox (2015). Influence of Depressive Symptoms on Speech Perception in Adverse Listening Conditions. Cognition and Emotion 29 (5):900-909.
  45.  22
    James M. McQueen, Dennis Norris & Anne Cutler (2006). Are There Really Interactive Processes in Speech Perception? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (12):533.
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  46.  10
    Christophe Pallier, Laura Bosch & Núria Sebastián-Gallés (1997). A Limit on Behavioral Plasticity in Speech Perception. Cognition 64 (3):9-17.
  47.  12
    Holger Mitterer, Odette Scharenborg & James M. McQueen (2013). Phonological Abstraction Without Phonemes in Speech Perception. Cognition 129 (2):356-361.
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  48.  3
    Bradley R. Buchsbaum, Gregory Hickok & Colin Humphries (2001). Role of Left Posterior Superior Temporal Gyrus in Phonological Processing for Speech Perception and Production. Cognitive Science 25 (5):663-678.
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  49.  6
    Jyrki Tuomainen, Tobias S. Andersen, Kaisa Tiippana & Mikko Sams (2005). Audio–Visual Speech Perception is Special. Cognition 96 (1):B13-B22.
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  50.  17
    Mary E. Stewart & Mitsuhiko Ota (2008). Lexical Effects on Speech Perception in Individuals with “Autistic” Traits. Cognition 109 (1):157-162.
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