Search results for '*Speech Processing (Mechanical)' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Yasuki Hashimoto & Kuniyoshi L. Sakai (2003). Brain Activations During Conscious Self-Monitoring of Speech Production with Delayed Auditory Feedback: An fMRI Study. Human Brain Mapping 20 (1):22-28.score: 225.0
  2. Aarre Laakso & Paco Calvo (2011). How Many Mechanisms Are Needed to Analyze Speech? A Connectionist Simulation of Structural Rule Learning in Artificial Language Acquisition. Cognitive Science 35 (7):1243-1281.score: 100.0
    Some empirical evidence in the artificial language acquisition literature has been taken to suggest that statistical learning mechanisms are insufficient for extracting structural information from an artificial language. According to the more than one mechanism (MOM) hypothesis, at least two mechanisms are required in order to acquire language from speech: (a) a statistical mechanism for speech segmentation; and (b) an additional rule-following mechanism in order to induce grammatical regularities. In this article, we present a set of neural network studies demonstrating (...)
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  3. James T. Townsend Nicholas Altieri (2011). An Assessment of Behavioral Dynamic Information Processing Measures in Audiovisual Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 95.0
    Research has shown that visual speech perception can assist accuracy in identification of spoken words. However, little is known about the dynamics of the processing mechanisms involved in audiovisual integration. In particular, architecture and capacity, measured using response time methodologies, have not been investigated. An issue related to architecture concerns whether the auditory and visual sources of the speech signal are integrated “early” or “late”. We propose that “early” integration most naturally corresponds to coactive processing whereas “late” integration (...)
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  4. Alain Morin (2005). Possible Links Between Self-Awareness and Inner Speech: Theoretical Background, Underlying Mechanisms, and Empirical Evidence. Journal of Consciousness Studies 12 (4-5):115-134.score: 93.0
    been recently proposed (Morin, 2003; 2004). The model takes into account most known mechanisms and processes leading to self-awareness, and examines their multiple and complex interactions. Inner speech is postulated to play a key-role in this model, as it establishes important connections between many of its ele- ments. This paper first reviews past and current references to a link between self-awareness and inner speech. It then presents an analysis of the nature of the relation between these two concepts. It is (...)
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  5. Friedemann Pulvermüller Natalia Egorova, Yury Shtyrov (2013). Early and Parallel Processing of Pragmatic and Semantic Information in Speech Acts: Neurophysiological Evidence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 93.0
    Although language is a tool for communication, most research in the neuroscience of language has focused on studying words and sentences, while little is known about the brain mechanisms of speech acts, or communicative functions, for which words and sentences are used as tools. Here the neural processing of two types of speech acts, Naming and Requesting, was addressed using the time-resolved event-related potential (ERP) technique. The brain responses for Naming and Request diverged as early as ~120 ms after (...)
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  6. Salomi S. Asaridou & James M. McQueen (2013). Speech and Music Shape the Listening Brain: Evidence for Shared Domain-General Mechanisms. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 84.0
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  7. Daniel Mirman, James L. McClelland, Lori L. Holt & James S. Magnuson (2008). Effects of Attention on the Strength of Lexical Influences on Speech Perception: Behavioral Experiments and Computational Mechanisms. Cognitive Science 32 (2):398-417.score: 84.0
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  8. Patti Adank, Shirley-Ann Rueschemeyer & Harold Bekkering (2013). The Role of Accent Imitation in Sensorimotor Integration During Processing of Intelligible Speech. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 78.0
    Recent theories on how listeners maintain perceptual invariance despite variation in the speech signal allocate a prominent role to imitation mechanisms. Notably, these simulation accounts propose that motor mechanisms support perception of ambiguous or noisy signals. Indeed, imitation of ambiguous signals, e.g., accented speech, has been found to aid effective speech comprehension. Here, we explored the possibility that imitation in speech benefits perception by increasing activation in speech perception and production areas. Participants rated the intelligibility of sentences spoken in an (...)
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  9. A. J. Shahin (2010). Neurophysiological Influence of Musical Training on Speech Perception. Frontiers in Psychology 2:126-126.score: 50.0
    Does musical training affect our perception of speech? For example, does learning to play a musical instrument modify the neural circuitry for auditory processing in a way that improves one’s ability to perceive speech more clearly in noisy environments? If so, can speech perception in individuals with hearing loss, who struggle in noisy situations, benefit from musical training? While music and speech exhibit some specialization in neural processing, there is evidence suggesting that skills acquired through musical training for (...)
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  10. Takenobu Murakami, Yoshikazu Ugawa & Ulf Ziemann (2013). Utility of TMS to Understand the Neurobiology of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 50.0
    According to a traditional view, speech perception and production are processed largely separately in sensory and motor brain areas. Recent psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies provide novel evidence that the sensory and motor systems dynamically interact in speech processing, by demonstrating that speech perception and imitation share regional brain activations. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of these sensorimotor interactions are not completely understood yet. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has often been used in the cognitive neurosciences, including speech research, as (...)
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  11. A. D. Patel (2010). Why Would Musical Training Benefit the Neural Encoding of Speech? The OPERA Hypothesis. Frontiers in Psychology 2:142-142.score: 50.0
    Mounting evidence suggests that musical training benefits the neural encoding of speech. This paper offers a hypothesis specifying why such benefits occur. The “OPERA” hypothesis proposes that such benefits are driven by adaptive plasticity in speech-processing networks, and that this plasticity occurs when five conditions are met. These are: 1) Overlap: there is anatomical overlap in the brain networks that process an acoustic feature used in both music and speech (e.g., waveform periodicity, amplitude envelope), 2) Precision: music places higher (...)
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  12. Ulf Ziemann Takenobu Murakami, Yoshikazu Ugawa (2013). Utility of TMS to Understand the Neurobiology of Speech. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 50.0
    According to a traditional view, speech perception and production are processed largely separately in sensory and motor brain areas. Recent psycholinguistic and neuroimaging studies provide novel evidence that the sensory and motor systems dynamically interact in speech processing, by demonstrating that speech perception and imitation share regional brain activations. However, the exact nature and mechanisms of these sensorimotor interactions are not completely understood yet. Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) has often been used in the cognitive neurosciences, including speech research, as (...)
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  13. Pienie Zwitserlood Heidrun Bien (2013). Processing Nasals with and Without Consecutive Context Phonemes: Evidence From Explicit Categorization and the N100. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
    With neurophysiological (N100) and explicit behavioural measures (two-alternative forced-choice categorization), we investigated how the processing of nasal segments of German is affected by following context phonemes and their place of articulation. We investigated pre-lexical processing, with speech stimuli excised from naturally spoken utterances. Participants heard nasals (/n/, /m/, and place-assimilated /n’/), both with and without a subsequent context phoneme. Context phonemes were voiced or voiceless, and either shared or did not share their place of articulation with the nasals. (...)
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  14. Marc Sato Maëva Garnier, Laurent Lamalle (2013). Neural Correlates of Phonetic Convergence and Speech Imitation. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 48.0
    Speakers unconsciously tend to mimic their interlocutor's speech during communicative interaction. This study aims at examining the neural correlates of phonetic convergence and deliberate imitation, in order to explore whether imitation of phonetic features, deliberate, or unconscious, might reflect a sensory-motor recalibration process. Sixteen participants listened to vowels with pitch varying around the average pitch of their own voice, and then produced the identified vowels, while their speech was recorded and their brain activity was imaged using fMRI. Three degrees and (...)
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  15. Yael Adini Yoram S. Bonneh, Yoram Levanon, Omrit Dean-Pardo, Lan Lossos (2010). Abnormal Speech Spectrum and Increased Pitch Variability in Young Autistic Children. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 48.0
    Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) who can speak often exhibit abnormal voice quality and speech prosody, but the exact nature and underlying mechanisms of these abnormalities, as well as their diagnostic power are currently unknown. Here we quantified speech abnormalities in terms of the properties of the long-term average spectrum (LTAS) and pitch variability in speech samples of 83 children (41 with ASD, 42 controls) ages 4-6.5 years, recorded while they named a sequence of daily-life pictures for 60 sec. (...)
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  16. Alain Morin, Self-Awareness Part 2: Neuroanatomy and Importance of Inner Speech.score: 42.0
    The present review of literature surveys two main issues related to self-referential processes: (1) Where in the brain are these processes located, and do they correlate with brain areas uniquely specialized in self-processing? (2) What are the empirical and theoretical links between inner speech and self-awareness? Although initial neuroimaging attempts tended to favor a right hemispheric view of selfawareness, more recent work shows that the brain areas which support self-related processes are located in both hemispheres and are not uniquely (...)
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  17. Jessica A. Grahn (2012). Neural Mechanisms of Rhythm Perception: Current Findings and Future Perspectives. Topics in Cognitive Science 4 (4):585-606.score: 42.0
    Perception of temporal patterns is fundamental to normal hearing, speech, motor control, and music. Certain types of pattern understanding are unique to humans, such as musical rhythm. Although human responses to musical rhythm are universal, there is much we do not understand about how rhythm is processed in the brain. Here, I consider findings from research into basic timing mechanisms and models through to the neuroscience of rhythm and meter. A network of neural areas, including motor regions, is regularly implicated (...)
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  18. Jagmeet S. Kanwal (1998). Charting Speech with Bats Without Requiring Maps. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):272-273.score: 42.0
    The effort to understand speech perception on the basis of relationships between acoustic parameters of speech sounds is to be recommended. Neural specializations (combination-sensitivity) for echolocation, communication, and sound localization probably constitute the common mechanisms of vertebrate auditory processing and may be essential for speech production as well as perception. There is, however, no need for meaningful maps.
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  19. Robert E. Remez (1998). Listening to Speech in the Dark. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):281-282.score: 42.0
    This commentary questions the proposed resemblance between the auditory mechanisms of localization and those of the sensory registration of speech sounds. Comparative evidence, which would show that the neurophysiology of localization is adequate to the task of categorizing consonants, does not exist. In addition, Sussman et al. do not offer sensory or perceptual evidence to confirm the presence in humans of processes promoting phoneme categorization that are analogous to the neurophysiology of localization. Furthermore, the computational simulation of the linear model (...)
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  20. Harvey M. Sussman, David Fruchter, Jon Hilbert & Joseph Sirosh (1998). Human Speech: A Tinkerer's Delight. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (2):287-295.score: 42.0
    The most frequent criticism of the target article is the lack of clear separability of human speech data relative to neuroethological data. A rationalization for this difference was sought in the tinkered nature of such new adaptations as human speech. Basic theoretical premises were defended, and new data were presented to support a claim that speakers maintain a low-noise relationship between F2 transition onset and offset frequencies for stops in pre-vocalic positions through articulatory choices. It remains a viable and testable (...)
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  21. Xing Tian & David Poeppel (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On the basis (...)
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  22. David Poeppel Xing Tian (2012). Mental Imagery of Speech: Linking Motor and Perceptual Systems Through Internal Simulation and Estimation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 42.0
    The neural basis of mental imagery has been investigated by localizing the underlying neural networks, mostly in motor and perceptual systems, separately. However, how modality-specific representations are top-down induced and how the action and perception systems interact in the context of mental imagery is not well understood. Imagined speech production (‘articulation imagery’), which induces the kinesthetic feeling of articulator movement and its auditory consequences, provides a new angle because of the concurrent involvement of motor and perceptual systems. On the basis (...)
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  23. Julia Holzgrefe, Caroline Wellmann, Caterina Petrone, Hubert Truckenbrodt, Barbara Hoehle & Isabell Wartenburger (2013). Brain Response to Prosodic Boundary Cues Depends on Boundary Position. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 36.0
    Prosodic information is crucial for spoken language comprehension and especially for syntactic parsing, because prosodic cues guide the hearer’s syntactic analysis. The time course and mechanisms of this interplay of prosody and syntax are not yet well understood. In particular, there is an ongoing debate whether local prosodic cues are taken into account automatically or whether they are processed in relation to the global prosodic context in which they appear. The present study explores whether the perception of a prosodic boundary (...)
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  24. Katherine Yoshida, Mijke Rhemtulla & Athena Vouloumanos (2012). Exclusion Constraints Facilitate Statistical Word Learning. Cognitive Science 36 (5):933-947.score: 33.0
    The roles of linguistic, cognitive, and social-pragmatic processes in word learning are well established. If statistical mechanisms also contribute to word learning, they must interact with these processes; however, there exists little evidence for such mechanistic synergy. Adults use co-occurrence statistics to encode speech–object pairings with detailed sensitivity in stochastic learning environments (Vouloumanos, 2008). Here, we replicate this statistical work with nonspeech sounds and compare the results with the previous speech studies to examine whether exclusion constraints contribute equally to the (...)
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  25. Caitlin Hilliard T. Florian Jaeger, Katrina Furth (2012). Incremental Phonological Encoding During Unscripted Sentence Production. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 33.0
    We investigate phonological encoding during unscripted sentence production, focusing on the effect of phonological overlap on phonological encoding. Previous work on this question has almost exclusively employed isolated word production or highly scripted multiword production. These studies have led to conflicting results: some studies found that phonological overlap between two words facilitates phonological encoding, while others found inhibitory effects. One worry with many of these paradigms is that they involve processes that are not typical to everyday language use, which calls (...)
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  26. Erika J. C. Laing, Ran Liu, Andrew J. Lotto & Lori L. Holt (2012). Tuned with a Tune: Talker Normalization Via General Auditory Processes. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 33.0
    Voices have unique acoustic signatures, contributing to the acoustic variability listeners must contend with in perceiving speech, and it has long been proposed that listeners normalize speech perception to information extracted from a talker’s speech. Initial attempts to explain talker normalization relied on extraction of articulatory referents, but recent studies of context-dependent auditory perception suggest that general auditory referents such as the long-term average spectrum (LTAS) of a talker’s speech similarly affect speech perception. The present study aimed to differentiate the (...)
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  27. S. Grossberg (1999). The Link Between Brain Learning, Attention, and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 8 (1):1-44.score: 27.0
    The processes whereby our brains continue to learn about a changing world in a stable fashion throughout life are proposed to lead to conscious experiences. These processes include the learning of top-down expectations, the matching of these expectations against bottom-up data, the focusing of attention upon the expected clusters of information, and the development of resonant states between bottom-up and top-down processes as they reach an attentive consensus between what is expected and what is there in the outside world. It (...)
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  28. Robert C. Cummins (2002). Haugeland on Representation and Intentionality. In Hugh Clapin (ed.), Philosophy of Mental Representation. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    Haugeland doesn’t have what I would call a theory of mental representation. Indeed, it isn’t clear that he believes there is such a thing. But he does have a theory of intentionality and a correlative theory of objectivity, and it is this material that I will be discussing in what follows. It will facilitate the discussion that follows to have at hand some distinctions and accompanying terminology I introduced in Representations, Targets and Attitudes (Cummins, 1996; RTA hereafter). Couching the discussion (...)
     
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  29. Bernard J. Baars (1997). In the Theater of Consciousness: The Workspace of the Mind. Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    The study of conscious experience has seen remarkable strides in the last ten years, reflecting important technological breakthroughs and the enormous efforts of researchers in disciplines as varied as neuroscience, cognitive science, and philosophy. Although still embroiled in debate, scientists are now beginning to find common ground in their understanding of consciousness, which may pave the way for a unified explanation of how and why we experience and understand the world around us. Written by eminent psychologist Bernard J. Baars, Inside (...)
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  30. Yosef Grodzinsky (2000). The Neurology of Syntax: Language Use Without Broca's Area. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):1-21.score: 27.0
    A new view of the functional role of the left anterior cortex in language use is proposed. The experimental record indicates that most human linguistic abilities are not localized in this region. In particular, most of syntax (long thought to be there) is not located in Broca's area and its vicinity (operculum, insula, and subjacent white matter). This cerebral region, implicated in Broca's aphasia, does have a role in syntactic processing, but a highly specific one: It is the neural (...)
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  31. Willem J. M. Levelt, Antje S. Meyer & Ardi Roelofs (2004). Relations of Lexical Access to Neural Implementation and Syntactic Encoding. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (2):299-301.score: 27.0
    How can one conceive of the neuronal implementation of the processing model we proposed in our target article? In his commentary (Pulvermüller 1999, reprinted here in this issue), Pulvermüller makes various proposals concerning the underlying neural mechanisms and their potential localizations in the brain. These proposals demonstrate the compatibility of our processing model and current neuroscience. We add further evidence on details of localization based on a recent meta-analysis of neuroimaging studies of word production (Indefrey & Levelt 2000). (...)
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  32. Irina Sandomirskaja (2008). Skin to Skin: Language in the Soviet Education of Deaf–Blind Children, the 1920s and 1930s. Studies in East European Thought 60 (4):321 - 337.score: 27.0
    The article deals with surdotiflopedagogika, a doctrine of special education for deaf–blind–mute children as it was developed in the USSR in the 1920s and 1930s. In the spirit of social constructivism of the early Stalinist society, surdotiflopedagogika presents itself as a technology for the manufacture of socially useful human beings out of handicapped children with sight and hearing impairments, “half-animals, half-plants”. Surdotiflopedagogika’s institutionalization and rationale as these were evolving under the special patronage of Maxim Gorkij are analysed. Its experimental aspect (...)
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  33. Elizabeth S. Spelke & Susan J. Hespos, Conceptual Precursors to Language.score: 27.0
    Because human languages vary in sound and meaning, children must learn which distinctions their language uses. For speech perception, this learning is selective: initially infants are sensitive to most acoustic distinctions used in any language1–3, and this sensitivity reflects basic properties of the auditory system rather than mechanisms specific to language4–7; however, infants’ sensitivity to non-native sound distinctions declines over the course of the first year8. Here we ask whether a similar process governs learning of word meanings. We investigated the (...)
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  34. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic. MIT Press.score: 27.0
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite easy (...)
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  35. Andy Calder, Gillian Rhodes, Mark Johnson & Jim Haxby (eds.) (2011). Oxford Handbook of Face Perception. OUP Oxford.score: 27.0
    The human face is unique among social stimuli in conveying such a variety of different characteristics. A person's identity, sex, race, age, emotional state, focus of attention, facial speech patterns, and attractiveness are all detected and interpreted with relative ease from the face. Humans also display a surprising degree of consistency in the extent to which personality traits, such as trustworthiness and likeability, are attributed to faces. In the past thirty years, face perception has become an area of major interest (...)
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  36. Russell T. Hurlburt & Eric Schwitzgebel (2007). Part One Proponent Meets Skeptic. In Describing Inner Experience? Proponent Meets Skeptic.score: 27.0
    On a remarkably thin base of evidence – largely the spectral analysis of points of light – astronomers possess, or appear to possess, an abundance of knowledge about the structure and history of the universe. We likewise know more than might even have been imagined a few centuries ago about the nature of physical matter, about the mechanisms of life, about the ancient past. Enormous theoretical and methodological ingenuity has been required to obtain such knowledge; it does not invite easy (...)
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  37. Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). The Poetry of Jean Daive. Continent 2 (2).score: 27.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 82–98 NOTE: This text is a translation of the original essay “Tekendichtheid: Over Jean Daives Narration d’équilibre 2: ‘Sllt’ ,” published in Parmentier 21.2 (2012): p. 65-71, accompanied by the same selection of poems in Dutch translation. It is not my intention to offer the following notes pertaining to one part of the series Narration d’équilibre [ Narrative of equilibrium ], written by the poet, translator, photographer, encyclopedist, and radio maker Jean Daive (1941), as a meticulous overview (...)
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  38. Ian Glynn (forthcoming). An Anatomy of Thought: The Origin and Machinery of Mind. Indian Philosophical Quarterly.score: 27.0
    Amazon.com Love, fear, hope, calculus, and game shows-how do all these spring from a few delicate pounds of meat? Neurophysiologist Ian Glynn lays the foundation for answering this question in his expansive An Anatomy of Thought, but stops short of committing to one particular theory. The book is a pleasant challenge, presenting the reader with the latest research and thinking about neuroscience and how it relates to various models of consciousness. Combining the aim of a textbook with the style of (...)
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  39. Maxwell Stephen Kennel (2013). What is a Compendium? Parataxis, Hypotaxis, and the Question of the Book. Continent 3 (1):44-49.score: 27.0
    Writing, the exigency of writing: no longer the writing that has always (through a necessity in no way avoidable) been in the service of the speech or thought that is called idealist (that is to say, moralizing), but rather the writing that through its own slowly liberated force (the aleatory force of absence) seems to devote itself solely to itself as something that remains without identity, and little by little brings forth possibilities that are entirely other: an anonymous, distracted, deferred, (...)
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  40. R. L. Gordon, C. L. Magne & E. W. Large (2010). EEG Correlates of Song Prosody: A New Look at the Relationship Between Linguistic and Musical Rhythm. Frontiers in Psychology 2:352-352.score: 27.0
    Song composers incorporate linguistic prosody into their music when setting words to melody, a process called “textsetting”. Composers tend to align the expected stress of the lyrics with strong metrical positions in the music. The present study was designed to explore the idea that temporal alignment helps listeners to better understand song lyrics by directing listeners’ attention to instances where strong syllables occur on strong beats. Three types of textsettings were created by aligning metronome clicks with all, some or none (...)
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  41. Marion Oberhuber, ‘Ōiwi Parker Jones, Thomas M. H. Hope, Susan Prejawa, Mohamed L. Seghier, David W. Green & Cathy J. Price (2013). Functionally Distinct Contributions of the Anterior and Posterior Putamen During Sublexical and Lexical Reading. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 27.0
    Previous studies have investigated orthographic-to-phonological mapping during reading by comparing brain activation for (1) reading words to object naming, or (2) reading pseudowords (e.g. “phume”) to words (e.g. “plume”). Here we combined both approaches to provide new insights into the underlying neural mechanisms. In fMRI data from 25 healthy adult readers, we first identified activation that was greater for reading words and pseudowords relative to picture and color naming. The most significant effect was observed in the left putamen, extending to (...)
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  42. Sonja A. Kotz Sarah Jessen (2013). On the Role of Crossmodal Prediction in Audiovisual Emotion Perception. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 27.0
    Humans rely on multiple sensory modalities to determine the emotional state of others. In fact, such multisensory perception may be one of the mechanisms explaining the ease and efficiency by which others’ emotions are recognized. But how and when exactly do the different modalities interact? One aspect in multisensory perception that has received increasing interest in recent years is the concept of crossmodal prediction. In emotion perception, as in most other settings, visual information precedes the auditory one. Thereby, leading in (...)
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  43. Jonathan Ginzburg & Robin Cooper (2014). Quotation Via Dialogical Interaction. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 23 (3):287-311.score: 27.0
    Quotation has been much studied in philosophy. Given that quotation allows one to diagonalize out of any grammar, there have been comparatively few attempts within the linguistic literature to develop an account within a formal linguistic theory. Nonetheless, given the ubiquity of quotation in natural language, linguists need to explicate the formal mechanisms it employs. The central claim of this paper is that once one assumes a dialogical perspective on language such as provided by the KoS (KoS is not an (...)
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  44. Jamie Iredell (2011). Belief: An Essay. Continent 1 (4).score: 27.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 279—285. Concerning its Transitive Nature, the Conversion of Native Americans of Spanish Colonial California, Indoctrinated Catholicism, & the Creation There’s no direct archaeological evidence that Jesus ever existed. 1 I memorized the Act of Contrition. I don’t remember it now, except the beginning: Forgive me Father for I have sinned . . . This was in preparation for the Sacrament of Holy Reconciliation, where in a confessional I confessed my sins to Father Scott, who looked like Jesus, (...)
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  45. David S. Miall & Ellen Dissanayake (2003). The Poetics of Babytalk. Human Nature 14 (4):337-364.score: 27.0
    Caretaker-infant attachment is a complex but well-recognized adaptation in humans. An early instance of (or precursor to) attachment behavior is the dyadic interaction between adults and infants of 6 to 24 weeks, commonly called "babytalk." Detailed analysis of 1 minute of spontaneous babytalk with an 8-week infant shows that the poetic texture of the mother’s speech—specifically its use of metrics, phonetics, and foregrounding—helps to shape and direct the baby’s attention, as it also coordinates the partners’ emotional communication. We hypothesize that (...)
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  46. Jacqueline Nadel Ouriel Grynszpan, Jérôme Simonin, Jean-Claude Martin (2012). Investigating Social Gaze as an Action-Perception Online Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 27.0
    In interpersonal interactions, linguistic information is complemented by non-linguistic information originating largely from facial expressions. The study of online face-to-face social interaction thus entails investigating the multimodal simultaneous processing of oral and visual percepts. Moreover, gaze in and of itself functions as a powerful communicative channel. In this respect, gaze should not be examined as a purely perceptive process but also as an active social performance. We designed a task involving multimodal deciphering of social information based on virtual characters, (...)
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  47. Wojciech Krysztofiak (2007). Spór o ontologię sytuacji jako spór o zasadę kompozycyjności. Argument z metafory. Filozofia Nauki 4.score: 27.0
    In the paper there is presented the argument for the situational paradigm of theory of language. In comparison to the nominativistic semantics it is argued in the paper that the propositional semantics is a better tool of explaining various speech acts in which the principle of compositionality is collapsed. In the paper there are also described referential mechanisms of metaphorical speech acts. In accordance with these mechanisms the metaphorical status of speech acts is determined by the collapse of Fregean referential (...)
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