Search results for '*Subliminal Stimulation' (try it on Scholar)

945 found
Order:
  1. A. Silverman & L. E. Baker (1935). An Attempt to Condition Various Responses to Subliminal Electrical Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (2):246.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  44
    S. Slipp (2000). Subliminal Stimulation Research and its Implications for Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis 28:305-320.
  3. Michela Balconi & Claudio Lucchiari (2007). Consciousness and Emotional Facial Expression Recognition: Subliminal/Supraliminal Stimulation Effect on N200 and P300 ERPs. [REVIEW] Journal of Psychophysiology 21 (2):100-108.
  4.  56
    Matthew H. Erdelyi (2004). Subliminal Perception and its Cognates: Theory, Indeterminacy, and Time. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):73-91.
    Unconscious processes, by whatever name they may be known , are invariably operationalized by the dissociation paradigm, any situation involving the dissociation between two indicators , one of availability and the other, of accessibility , such that, ε>α. Subliminal perception has been traditionally defined by a special case of the dissociation paradigm in which availability exceeds accessibility when accessibility is null . Construct validity issues bedevil all dissociation paradigms since it is not clear what might constitute appropriate indicators that, moreover, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  5. Stanislas Dehaene, Jean-Pierre Changeux, Lionel Naccache, Jérôme Sackur & Claire Sergent (2006). Conscious, Preconscious, and Subliminal Processing: A Testable Taxonomy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (5):204-211.
  6.  73
    Ap Dijksterhuis, Henk Aarts & Pamela K. Smith (2005). The Power of the Subliminal: On Subliminal Persuasion and Other Potential Applications. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press 77-106.
  7.  43
    John F. Kihlstrom (2004). Availability, Accessibility, and Subliminal Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):92-100.
  8.  74
    Anthony G. Greenwald, R. L. Abrams, Lionel Naccache & Stanislas Dehaene (2003). Long-Term Semantic Memory Versus Contextual Memory in Unconscious Number Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):235-247.
    Subjects classified visible 2-digit numbers as larger or smaller than 55. Target numbers were preceded by masked 2-digit primes that were either congruent (same relation to 55) or incongruent. Experiments 1 and 2 showed prime congruency effects for stimuli never included in the set of classified visible targets, indicating subliminal priming based on long-term semantic memory. Experiments 2 and 3 went further to demonstrate paradoxical unconscious priming effects resulting from task context. For example, after repeated practice classifying 73 as (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  9. U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed (2000). Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions. Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.
  10.  43
    Martin Eimer & Friederike Schlaghecken (2002). Links Between Conscious Awareness and Response Inhibition: Evidence From Masked Priming. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (3):514-520.
  11. Michela Balconi (2006). Exploring Consciousness in Emotional Face Decoding: An Event-Related Potential Analysis. Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs 132 (2):129-150.
  12.  12
    Andrea Kiesel, Wilfried Kunde & Joachim Hoffmann (2007). Unconscious Priming According to Multiple s-R Rules. Cognition 104 (1):89-105.
  13.  26
    Robert Bornstein (1989). Subliminal Techniques as Propaganda Tools: Review and Critique. Journal of Mind and Behavior 10 (3):231-262.
    Research on perception without awareness has provoked strong emotional responses from individuals within and outside the scientific community, due in part to the perceived potential for abuse of subliminal techniques. In this paper, four basic issues regarding the use of subliminal techniques for propaganda purposes are discussed: whether exposure to subliminal stimuli can produce significant, predictable changes in affect, cognition and behavior; whether these effects are robust and powerful enough to make the use of subliminal techniques for propaganda purposes feasible; (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  14.  34
    Michael Snodgrass (2004). The Dissociation Paradigm and its Discontents: How Can Unconscious Perception or Memory Be Inferred? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):107-116.
    Erdelyi does us all a great service by his customarily incisive discussion of the various ways in which our field tends to neglect, confuse, and misunderstand numerous critical issues in attempting to differentiate conscious from unconscious perception and memory. Although no single commentary could hope to comprehensively assess these issues, I will address Erdelyi’s three main points: How the dissociation paradigm can be used to validly infer unconscious perception; The implications of below-chance effects; and The role of time. I suggest (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  15.  41
    Eyal M. Reingold (2004). Unconscious Perception: Assumptions and Interpretive Difficulties. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):117-122.
    Reingold and MerikleÕs (1988, 1990) critique of the classic dissociation paradigm identified several issues as inherent problems that severely undermine the utility of this paradigm. Erdelyi (2004) extending his prior analysis (Erdelyi, 1985, 1986) points out several additional factors that may complicate the interpretation of empirically obtained dissociations. The goal of the present manuscript is to further discuss some of these commonly neglected interpretive difficulties. Ó 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  16.  8
    Talis Bachmann (2004). Inaptitude of the Signal Detection Theory, Useful Vexation From the Microgenetic View, and Inevitability of Neurobiological Signatures in Understanding Perceptual (Un)Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):101-106.
  17.  8
    Howard Shevrin (2001). Event-Related Markers of Unconscious Processes. International Journal of Psychophysiology. Special Issue 42 (2):209-218.
  18.  19
    Caroline Hunt, Edmund Keogh & Christopher C. French (2006). Anxiety Sensitivity: The Role of Conscious Awareness and Selective Attentional Bias to Physical Threat. Emotion 6 (3):418-428.
  19.  10
    Katharina Henke, Theodor Landis & Hans J. Markowitsch (1993). Subliminal Perception of Pictures in the Right Hemisphere. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):225-236.
    We addressed the questions whether stimuli presented below the threshold of verbal awareness are nevertheless perceived and whether there are perceptual differences between the two cerebral hemispheres. Pictures of line drawn objects and animals were subliminally presented to each visual half-field for subsequent identification in a form as fragmented as possible. The performance of 40 healthy subjects was compared to that of 63 controls. Whereas identification performance after blank presentation in the experimental group did not differ from that of controls, (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. Staffan Sohlberg & Billy Jansson (2002). Unconscious Responses to "Mommy and I Are One": Does Gender Matter? In Robert F. Bornstein & Joseph M. Masling (eds.), The Psychodynamics of Gender and Gender Role. Empirical Studies in Psychoanalytic Theories, Vol. 10. American Psychological Association 165-201.
  21. Robert Balas, Aleksandra Gruszka, Błażej Szymura & Katarzyna Żyła (2007). Individual Differences in Unconscious Processing. Polish Psychological Bulletin 38 (1):32-39.
  22.  21
    Morten Overgaard, Jorgen Feldbaek Nielsen & Anders Fuglsang-Frederiksen (2004). A TMS Study of the Ventral Projections From V1 with Implications for the Finding of Neural Correlates of Consciousness. Brain and Cognition 54 (1):58-64.
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  23.  43
    Troy A. W. Visser, Philip M. Merikle & Vincent Di Lollo (2005). Priming in the Attentional Blink: Perception Without Awareness? Visual Cognition 12 (7):1362-1372.
  24. Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof & Damiaan Denys (2015). Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation on the Lived Experience of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients. PLoS ONE 10 (8):1-29.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a relatively new, experimental treatment for patients suffering from treatment-refractory Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). The effects of treatment are typically assessed with psychopathological scales that measure the amount of symptoms. However, clinical experience indicates that the effects of DBS are not limited to symptoms only: patients for instance report changes in perception, feeling stronger and more confident, and doing things unreflectively. Our aim is to get a better overview of the whole variety of changes (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25.  69
    Felicitas Kraemer (2013). Me, Myself and My Brain Implant: Deep Brain Stimulation Raises Questions of Personal Authenticity and Alienation. Neuroethics 6 (3):483-497.
    In this article, I explore select case studies of Parkinson patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in light of the notions of alienation and authenticity. While the literature on DBS has so far neglected the issues of authenticity and alienation, I argue that interpreting these cases in terms of these concepts raises new issues for not only the philosophical discussion of neuro-ethics of DBS, but also for the psychological and medical approach to patients under DBS. In (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   9 citations  
  26.  66
    Thomas Zoega Ramsøy & Morten Overgaard (2004). Introspection and Subliminal Perception. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 3 (1):1-23.
    Subliminal perception (SP) is today considered a well-supported theory stating that perception can occur without conscious awareness and have a significant impact on later behaviour and thought. In this article, we first present and discuss different approaches to the study of SP. In doing this, we claim that most approaches are based on a dichotomic measure of awareness. Drawing upon recent advances and discussions in the study of introspection and phenomenological psychology, we argue for both the possibility and necessity of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   28 citations  
  27.  45
    Karsten Witt, Jens Kuhn, Lars Timmermann, Mateusz Zurowski & Christiane Woopen (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation and the Search for Identity. Neuroethics 6 (3):499-511.
    Ethical evaluation of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease is complicated by results that can be described as involving changes in the patient’s identity. The risk of becoming another person following surgery is alarming for patients, caregivers and clinicians alike. It is one of the most urgent conceptual and ethical problems facing deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease at this time. In our paper we take issue with this problem on two accounts. First, we elucidate (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  28.  59
    Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld, Martin Stokhof & Damiaan Denys (2013). The Phenomenology of Deep Brain Stimulation-Induced Changes in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder Patients: An Enactive Affordance-Based Model. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:1-14.
    People suffering from Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD) do things they do not want to do, and/or they think things they do not want to think. In about 10 percent of OCD patients, none of the available treatment options is effective. A small group of these patients is currently being treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS). Deep brain stimulation involves the implantation of electrodes in the brain. These electrodes give a continuous electrical pulse to the brain (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29.  78
    Françoise Baylis (2013). “I Am Who I Am”: On the Perceived Threats to Personal Identity From Deep Brain Stimulation. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (3):513-526.
    This article explores the notion of the dislocated self following deep brain stimulation (DBS) and concludes that when personal identity is understood in dynamic, narrative, and relational terms, the claim that DBS is a threat to personal identity is deeply problematic. While DBS may result in profound changes in behaviour, mood and cognition (characteristics closely linked to personality), it is not helpful to characterize DBS as threatening to personal identity insofar as this claim is either false, misdirected or trivially (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  30.  53
    Maartje Schermer (2013). Health, Happiness and Human Enhancement—Dealing with Unexpected Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 6 (3):435-445.
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a treatment involving the implantation of electrodes into the brain. Presently, it is used for neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease, but indications are expanding to psychiatric disorders such as depression, addiction and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Theoretically, it may be possible to use DBS for the enhancement of various mental functions. This article discusses a case of an OCD patient who felt very happy with the DBS treatment, even though her symptoms were not (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  31.  37
    Sanneke de Haan, Erik Rietveld & Damiaan Denys (2014). Stimulating Good Practice - What an Embodied Cognition Approach Could Mean for Deep Brain Stimulation Practice. American Journal of Bioethics Neuroscience 5 (4).
    We whole-heartedly agree with Mecacci and Haselager(2014) on the need to investigate the psychosocial effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS), and particularly to find out how to prevent adverse psychosocial effects. We also agree with the authors on the value of an embodied, embedded, enactive approach (EEC) to the self and the mind–brain problem. However, we do not think this value primarily lies in dissolving a so-called “maladaptation” of patients to their DBS device. In this comment, we challenge three (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32.  30
    Frederic Gilbert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours. Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  33.  15
    Frederic Gilbert (2012). The Burden of Normality: From 'Chronically Ill' to 'Symptom Free'. New Ethical Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation Postoperative Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (7):408-412.
    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson’s disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  34.  50
    Nir Lipsman & Walter Glannon (2013). Brain, Mind and Machine: What Are the Implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for Perceptions of Personal Identity, Agency and Free Will? Bioethics 27 (9):465-470.
    Brain implants, such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), which are designed to improve motor, mood and behavioural pathology, present unique challenges to our understanding of identity, agency and free will. This is because these devices can have visible effects on persons' physical and psychological properties yet are essentially undetectable when operating correctly. They can supplement and compensate for one's inherent abilities and faculties when they are compromised by neuropsychiatric disorders. Further, unlike talk therapy or pharmacological treatments, patients need not (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  35.  10
    Frederic Gilbert (2015). Self-Estrangement & Deep Brain Stimulation: Ethical Issues Related to Forced Explantation. Neuroethics 8 (2):107-114.
    Although being generally safe, the use of Deep Brain Stimulation has been associated with a significant number of patients experiencing postoperative psychological and neurological harm within experimental trials. A proportion of these postoperative severe adverse effects have lead to the decision to medically prescribe device deactivation or removal. However, there is little debate in the literature as to what is in the patient’s best interest when device removal has been prescribed; in particular, what should be the conceptual approach to (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  36.  11
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Tony Ro & Haluk Ogmen (2004). A Comparison of Masking by Visual and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Implications for the Study of Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):829-843.
    Visual stimuli as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used: to suppress the visibility of a target and to recover the visibility of a target that has been suppressed by another mask. Both types of stimulation thus provide useful methods for studying the microgenesis of object perception. We first review evidence of similarities between the processes by which a TMS mask and a visual mask can either suppress the visibility of targets or recover such suppressed visibility. However, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  37.  10
    Hannah Maslen, Jonathan Pugh & Julian Savulescu (2015). The Ethics of Deep Brain Stimulation for the Treatment of Anorexia Nervosa. Neuroethics 8 (3):215-230.
    There is preliminary evidence, from case reports and investigational studies, to suggest that Deep Brain Stimulation could be used to treat some patients with Anorexia Nervosa. Although this research is at an early stage, the invasive nature of the intervention and the vulnerability of the potential patients are such that anticipatory ethical analysis is warranted. In this paper, we first show how different treatment mechanisms raise different philosophical and ethical questions. We distinguish three potential mechanisms alluded to in (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38.  28
    Farah Focquaert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making. Neuroethics 6 (3):447-455.
    This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders in children. At present, deep brain stimulation is used to treat movement disorders in children and a few cases of deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders in adolescents have been reported. Ethical guidelines on the use of deep brain stimulation in children are therefore urgently needed. This paper focuses on the decision-making process, and provides an ethical framework for (future) (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  39.  20
    Veronica Johansson, Martin Garwicz, Martin Kanje, Helena Röcklinsberg, Jens Schouenborg, Anders Tingström & Ulf Görman (2013). Beyond Blind Optimism and Unfounded Fears: Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression. Neuroethics 6 (3):457-471.
    The introduction of new medical treatments based on invasive technologies has often been surrounded by both hopes and fears. Hope, since a new intervention can create new opportunities either in terms of providing a cure for the disease or impairment at hand; or as alleviation of symptoms. Fear, since an invasive treatment involving implanting a medical device can result in unknown complications such as hardware failure and undesirable medical consequences. However, hopes and fears may also arise due to the cultural (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  40.  11
    Daniel A. Pollen (2004). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):626-645.
    Libet discovered that a substantial duration (> 0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of the somatosensory cortex at threshold currents is required before human subjects can report that a conscious somatosensory experience had occurred. Using a reaction time method we confirm that a similarly long stimulation duration at threshold currents is required for activation of elementary visual experiences (phosphenes) in human subjects following stimulation of the surface of the striate cortex. However, the reaction times (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  41.  19
    Fabrice Jotterand, Shawn M. McClintock, Archie A. Alexander & Mustafa M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). Neuroethics 3 (1):13-22.
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his or her cognitive abilities and (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  42.  13
    Roy Dings & Leon de Bruin (forthcoming). Situating the Self: Understanding the Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-15.
    The article proposes a theoretical model to account for changes in self due to Deep Brain Stimulation . First, we argue that most existing models postulate a very narrow conception of self, and thus fail to capture the full range of potentially relevant DBS-induced changes. Second, building on previous work by Shaun Gallagher, we propose a modified ‘pattern-theory of self’, which provides a richer picture of the possible consequences of DBS treatment.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43.  14
    Grant Gillett (2011). The Gold-Plated Leucotomy Standard and Deep Brain Stimulation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):35-44.
    Walter Freeman, the self styled neurosurgeon, became famous (or infamous) for psychosurgery. The operation of frontal leucotomy swept through the world (with Freeman himself performing something like 18,000 cases) but it has tainted the whole idea of psychosurgery down to the present era. Modes of psychosurgery such as Deep Brain Stimulation and other highly selective neurosurgical procedures for neurological and psychiatric conditions are in ever-increasing use in current practice. The new, more exciting techniques are based in a widely held (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  44.  43
    Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. John G. Taylor (1998). Constructing the Relational Mind. Psyche 4 (10).
    The "relational mind" approach to the inner content of consciousness is developed in terms of various control structures and processing strategies and their possible neurobiological identifications in brain sites. This leads naturally to a division of consciousness into a passive and an active part. A global control structure for the "single strand" aspect of consciousness is proposed as the thalamo-nucleus reticularis thalami-cortex coupled system, which is related to experimental data on the electrical stimulation of awareness. Local control, in terms (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  46.  24
    Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Sven Nyholm & Elizabeth O'Neill (forthcoming). Deep Brain Stimulation, Continuity Over Time, and the True Self. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics.
    One of the topics that often comes up in ethical discussions of deep brain stimulation (DBS) is the question of what impact DBS has, or might have, on the patient’s self. This is often understood as a question of whether DBS poses a “threat” to personal identity, which is typically understood as having to do with psychological and/or narrative continuity over time. In this article, we argue that the discussion of whether DBS is a “threat” to continuity over time (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48.  9
    George A. Ojemann (1983). Brain Organization for Language From the Perspective of Electrical Stimulation Mapping. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):189.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   122 citations  
  49.  27
    Sid Kouider & Emmanuel Dupoux (2004). Partial Awareness Creates the "Illusion" of Subliminal Semantic Priming. Psychological Science 15 (2):75-81.
  50.  6
    Laurence J. Severance & Frederick N. Dyer (1973). Failure of Subliminal Word Presentations to Generate Interference to Color Naming. Journal of Experimental Psychology 101 (1):186.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   29 citations  
1 — 50 / 945