Search results for '*Subliminal Stimulation' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. Silverman & L. E. Baker (1935). An Attempt to Condition Various Responses to Subliminal Electrical Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 18 (2):246.score: 85.0
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  2. S. Slipp (2000). Subliminal Stimulation Research and its Implications for Psychoanalytic Theory and Treatment. Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis 28:305-320.score: 63.0
  3. Michela Balconi & Claudio Lucchiari (2007). Consciousness and Emotional Facial Expression Recognition: Subliminal/Supraliminal Stimulation Effect on N200 and P300 ERPs. [REVIEW] Journal of Psychophysiology 21 (2):100-108.score: 59.0
  4. Matthew H. Erdelyi (2004). Subliminal Perception and its Cognates: Theory, Indeterminacy, and Time. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):73-91.score: 54.0
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  5. John F. Kihlstrom (2004). Availability, Accessibility, and Subliminal Perception. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):92-100.score: 54.0
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  6. Ap Dijksterhuis, Henk Aarts & Pamela K. Smith (2005). The Power of the Subliminal: On Subliminal Persuasion and Other Potential Applications. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford University Press. 77-106.score: 54.0
  7. Stanislas Dehaene, Jean-Pierre Changeux, Lionel Naccache, Jérôme Sackur & Claire Sergent (2006). Conscious, Preconscious, and Subliminal Processing: A Testable Taxonomy. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (5):204-211.score: 46.0
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  8. Anthony G. Greenwald, R. L. Abrams, Lionel Naccache & Stanislas Dehaene (2003). Long-Term Semantic Memory Versus Contextual Memory in Unconscious Number Processing. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (2):235-247.score: 46.0
    Subjects classified visible 2-digit numbers as larger or smaller than 55. Target numbers were preceded by masked 2-digit primes that were either congruent (same relation to 55) or incongruent. Experiments 1 and 2 showed prime congruency effects for stimuli never included in the set of classified visible targets, indicating subliminal priming based on long-term semantic memory. Experiments 2 and 3 went further to demonstrate paradoxical unconscious priming effects resulting from task context. For example, after repeated practice classifying 73 as larger (...)
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  9. U. Dimberg, M. Thunberg & K. Elmehed (2000). Unconscious Facial Reactions to Emotional Facial Expressions. Psychological Science 11 (1):86-89.score: 42.0
  10. Michael Snodgrass (2004). The Dissociation Paradigm and its Discontents: How Can Unconscious Perception or Memory Be Inferred? Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):107-116.score: 42.0
  11. Eyal M. Reingold (2004). Unconscious Perception: Assumptions and Interpretive Difficulties. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):117-122.score: 42.0
    Reingold and MerikleÕs (1988, 1990) critique of the classic dissociation paradigm identified several issues as inherent problems that severely undermine the utility of this paradigm. Erdelyi (2004) extending his prior analysis (Erdelyi, 1985, 1986) points out several additional factors that may complicate the interpretation of empirically obtained dissociations. The goal of the present manuscript is to further discuss some of these commonly neglected interpretive difficulties. Ó 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
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  12. Michela Balconi (2006). Exploring Consciousness in Emotional Face Decoding: An Event-Related Potential Analysis. Genetic, Social, and General Psychology Monographs 132 (2):129-150.score: 42.0
  13. Martin Eimer & Friederike Schlaghecken (2002). Links Between Conscious Awareness and Response Inhibition: Evidence From Masked Priming. Psychonomic Bulletin and Review 9 (3):514-520.score: 42.0
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  14. Caroline Hunt, Edmund Keogh & Christopher C. French (2006). Anxiety Sensitivity: The Role of Conscious Awareness and Selective Attentional Bias to Physical Threat. Emotion 6 (3):418-428.score: 42.0
  15. Howard Shevrin (2001). Event-Related Markers of Unconscious Processes. International Journal of Psychophysiology. Special Issue 42 (2):209-218.score: 42.0
  16. Talis Bachmann (2004). Inaptitude of the Signal Detection Theory, Useful Vexation From the Microgenetic View, and Inevitability of Neurobiological Signatures in Understanding Perceptual (Un)Awareness. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (1):101-106.score: 42.0
  17. Andrea Kiesel, Wilfried Kunde & Joachim Hoffmann (2007). Unconscious Priming According to Multiple s-R Rules. Cognition 104 (1):89-105.score: 42.0
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  18. Staffan Sohlberg & Billy Jansson (2002). Unconscious Responses to "Mommy and I Are One": Does Gender Matter? In Robert F. Bornstein & Joseph M. Masling (eds.), The Psychodynamics of Gender and Gender Role. Empirical Studies in Psychoanalytic Theories, Vol. 10. American Psychological Association. 165-201.score: 42.0
  19. Robert Balas, Aleksandra Gruszka, Błażej Szymura & Katarzyna Żyła (2007). Individual Differences in Unconscious Processing. Polish Psychological Bulletin 38 (1):32-39.score: 42.0
  20. Troy A. W. Visser, Philip M. Merikle & Vincent Di Lollo (2005). Priming in the Attentional Blink: Perception Without Awareness? Visual Cognition 12 (7):1362-1372.score: 34.0
  21. Morten Overgaard, Jorgen Feldbaek Nielsen & Anders Fuglsang-Frederiksen (2004). A TMS Study of the Ventral Projections From V1 with Implications for the Finding of Neural Correlates of Consciousness. Brain and Cognition 54 (1):58-64.score: 34.0
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  22. Lotta Winter, Tillmann H. C. Kruger, Jean Laurens, Harald Engler, Manfred Schedlowski, Dominik Straumann & M. Axel Wollmer (2012). Vestibular Stimulation on a Motion-Simulator Impacts on Mood States. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 32.0
    We are familiar with both pleasant and unpleasant psychotropic effects of movements associated with vestibular stimulation. However, there has been no attempt to scientifically explore the impact of different kinds of vestibular stimulation on mood states and biomarkers. A sample of 23 healthy volunteers were subjected to a random sequence of three different passive rotational (yaw, pitch, roll) and translational (heave, sway, surge) vestibular stimulation paradigms using a motion-simulator (hexapod). Mood states were measured by means of questionnaires (...)
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  23. Françoise Baylis (2013). “I Am Who I Am”: On the Perceived Threats to Personal Identity From Deep Brain Stimulation. [REVIEW] Neuroethics 6 (3):513-526.score: 18.0
    This article explores the notion of the dislocated self following deep brain stimulation (DBS) and concludes that when personal identity is understood in dynamic, narrative, and relational terms, the claim that DBS is a threat to personal identity is deeply problematic. While DBS may result in profound changes in behaviour, mood and cognition (characteristics closely linked to personality), it is not helpful to characterize DBS as threatening to personal identity insofar as this claim is either false, misdirected or trivially (...)
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  24. Felicitas Kraemer (2013). Me, Myself and My Brain Implant: Deep Brain Stimulation Raises Questions of Personal Authenticity and Alienation. Neuroethics 6 (3):483-497.score: 18.0
    In this article, I explore select case studies of Parkinson patients treated with deep brain stimulation (DBS) in light of the notions of alienation and authenticity. While the literature on DBS has so far neglected the issues of authenticity and alienation, I argue that interpreting these cases in terms of these concepts raises new issues for not only the philosophical discussion of neuro-ethics of DBS, but also for the psychological and medical approach to patients under DBS. In particular, I (...)
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  25. Maartje Schermer (2013). Health, Happiness and Human Enhancement—Dealing with Unexpected Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 6 (3):435-445.score: 18.0
    Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) is a treatment involving the implantation of electrodes into the brain. Presently, it is used for neurological disorders like Parkinson’s disease, but indications are expanding to psychiatric disorders such as depression, addiction and Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD). Theoretically, it may be possible to use DBS for the enhancement of various mental functions. This article discusses a case of an OCD patient who felt very happy with the DBS treatment, even though her symptoms were not reduced. (...)
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  26. Karsten Witt, Jens Kuhn, Lars Timmermann, Mateusz Zurowski & Christiane Woopen (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation and the Search for Identity. Neuroethics 6 (3):499-511.score: 18.0
    Ethical evaluation of deep brain stimulation as a treatment for Parkinson’s disease is complicated by results that can be described as involving changes in the patient’s identity. The risk of becoming another person following surgery is alarming for patients, caregivers and clinicians alike. It is one of the most urgent conceptual and ethical problems facing deep brain stimulation in Parkinson’s disease at this time. In our paper we take issue with this problem on two accounts. First, we elucidate (...)
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  27. Nir Lipsman & Walter Glannon (2013). Brain, Mind and Machine: What Are the Implications of Deep Brain Stimulation for Perceptions of Personal Identity, Agency and Free Will? Bioethics 27 (9):465-470.score: 18.0
    Brain implants, such as Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS), which are designed to improve motor, mood and behavioural pathology, present unique challenges to our understanding of identity, agency and free will. This is because these devices can have visible effects on persons' physical and psychological properties yet are essentially undetectable when operating correctly. They can supplement and compensate for one's inherent abilities and faculties when they are compromised by neuropsychiatric disorders. Further, unlike talk therapy or pharmacological treatments, patients need not (...)
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  28. Adrian Carter, Emily Bell, Eric Racine & Wayne Hall (2011). Ethical Issues Raised by Proposals to Treat Addiction Using Deep Brain Stimulation. Neuroethics 4 (2):129-142.score: 18.0
    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been proposed as a potential treatment of drug addiction on the basis of its effects on drug self-administration in animals and on addictive behaviours in some humans treated with DBS for other psychiatric or neurological conditions. DBS is seen as a more reversible intervention than ablative neurosurgery but it is nonetheless a treatment that carries significant risks. A review of preclinical and clinical evidence for the use of DBS to treat addiction suggests that more (...)
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  29. Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.score: 18.0
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious (...)
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  30. Farah Focquaert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation in Children: Parental Authority Versus Shared Decision-Making. Neuroethics 6 (3):447-455.score: 18.0
    This paper discusses the use of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of neurological and psychiatric disorders in children. At present, deep brain stimulation is used to treat movement disorders in children and a few cases of deep brain stimulation for psychiatric disorders in adolescents have been reported. Ethical guidelines on the use of deep brain stimulation in children are therefore urgently needed. This paper focuses on the decision-making process, and provides an ethical framework for (future) (...)
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  31. Veronica Johansson, Martin Garwicz, Martin Kanje, Helena Röcklinsberg, Jens Schouenborg, Anders Tingström & Ulf Görman (2013). Beyond Blind Optimism and Unfounded Fears: Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression. Neuroethics 6 (3):457-471.score: 18.0
    The introduction of new medical treatments based on invasive technologies has often been surrounded by both hopes and fears. Hope, since a new intervention can create new opportunities either in terms of providing a cure for the disease or impairment at hand; or as alleviation of symptoms. Fear, since an invasive treatment involving implanting a medical device can result in unknown complications such as hardware failure and undesirable medical consequences. However, hopes and fears may also arise due to the cultural (...)
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  32. Grant Gillett (2011). The Gold-Plated Leucotomy Standard and Deep Brain Stimulation. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 8 (1):35-44.score: 18.0
    Walter Freeman, the self styled neurosurgeon, became famous (or infamous) for psychosurgery. The operation of frontal leucotomy swept through the world (with Freeman himself performing something like 18,000 cases) but it has tainted the whole idea of psychosurgery down to the present era. Modes of psychosurgery such as Deep Brain Stimulation and other highly selective neurosurgical procedures for neurological and psychiatric conditions are in ever-increasing use in current practice. The new, more exciting techniques are based in a widely held (...)
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  33. Frederic Gilbert (2012). The Burden of Normality: From 'Chronically Ill' to 'Symptom Free'. New Ethical Challenges for Deep Brain Stimulation Postoperative Treatment. Journal of Medical Ethics 8 (7):408-412.score: 18.0
    Although an invasive medical intervention, Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) has been regarded as an efficient and safe treatment of Parkinson’s disease for the last 20 years. In terms of clinical ethics, it is worth asking whether the use of DBS may have unanticipated negative effects similar to those associated with other types of psychosurgery. Clinical studies of epileptic patients who have undergone an anterior temporal lobectomy have identified a range of side effects and complications in a number of domains: (...)
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  34. Frederic Gilbert (2013). Deep Brain Stimulation for Treatment Resistant Depression: Postoperative Feelings of Self-Estrangement, Suicide Attempt and Impulsive–Aggressive Behaviours. Neuroethics 6 (3):473-481.score: 18.0
    The goal of this article is to shed light on Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) postoperative suicidality risk factors within Treatment Resistant Depression (TRD) patients, in particular by focusing on the ethical concern of enrolling patient with history of self-estrangement, suicide attempts and impulsive–aggressive inclinations. In order to illustrate these ethical issues we report and review a clinical case associated with postoperative feelings of self-estrangement, self-harm behaviours and suicide attempt leading to the removal of DBS devices. Could prospectively identifying and (...)
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  35. Daniel A. Pollen (2004). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):626-645.score: 18.0
    Libet discovered that a substantial duration (> 0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of the somatosensory cortex at threshold currents is required before human subjects can report that a conscious somatosensory experience had occurred. Using a reaction time method we confirm that a similarly long stimulation duration at threshold currents is required for activation of elementary visual experiences (phosphenes) in human subjects following stimulation of the surface of the striate cortex. However, the reaction times (...)
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  36. Jean Levasseur-Moreau, Jerome Brunelin & Shirley Fecteau (2013). Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Can Induce Paradoxical Facilitation. Are These Neuroenhancements Transferable and Meaningful to Security Services? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    For ages, we have been looking for ways to enhance our physical and cognitive capacities in order to augment our security. One potential way to achieve this goal may be to externally stimulate the brain. Methods of noninvasive brain stimulation (NIBS), such as repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation and transcranial electrical stimulation, have been recently developed to modulate brain activity. Both techniques are relatively safe and can transiently modify motor and cognitive functions outlasting the stimulation period. The (...)
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  37. Manon Grube, Kwang-Hyuk Lee, Timothy D. Griffiths, Anthony T. Barker & Peter W. Woodruff (2010). Transcranial Magnetic Theta-Burst Stimulation of the Human Cerebellum Distinguishes Absolute, Duration-Based From Relative, Beat-Based Perception of Subsecond Time Intervals. Frontiers in Psychology 1:171-171.score: 18.0
    Cerebellar functions in two types of perceptual timing were assessed: the absolute (duration-based) timing of single intervals and the relative (beat-based) timing of rhythmic sequences. Continuous transcranial magnetic theta-burst stimulation (cTBS) was applied over the medial cerebellum and performance was measured adaptively before and after stimulation. A large and significant effect was found in the TBS (n=12) compared to the SHAM (n=12) group for single-interval timing but not for the detection of a regular beat or a deviation from (...)
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  38. Hans-Jochen Heinze, Marcus Heldmann, Jürgen Voges, Hermann Hinrichs, Josep Marco-Pallares, Jens-Max Hopf, Ulf Müller, Imke Galazky, Volker Sturm, Bernhard Bogerts & Thomas F. Münte (2009). Counteracting Incentive Sensitization in Severe Alcohol Dependence Using Deep Brain Stimulation of the Nucleus Accumbens: Clinical and Basic Science Aspects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:22.score: 18.0
    The ventral striatum / nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the craving for drugs and alcohol which is a major reason for relapse of addicted people. Craving might be induced by drug-related cues. This suggests that disruption of craving-related neural activity in the nucleus accumbens may significantly reduce craving in alcohol-dependent patients. Here we report on preliminary clinical and neurophysiological evidence in three male patients who were treated with high frequency deep brain stimulation of the nucleus accumbens bilaterally. All (...)
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  39. Luigi De Gennaro Maria Concetta Pellicciari, Susanna Cordone, Cristina Marzano, Stefano Bignotti, Anna Gazzoli, Carlo Miniussi (2013). Dorsolateral Prefrontal Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in Patients with Major Depression Locally Affects Alpha Power of REM Sleep. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Sleep alterations are among the most important disabling manifestation symptoms of Major Depression Disorder (MDD). A critical role of sleep importance is also underlined by the fact that its adjustment has been proposed as an objective marker of clinical remission in MDD. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) represents a relatively novel therapeutic tool for the treatment of drug-resistant depression. Nevertheless besides clinical evaluation of the mood improvement after rTMS, we have no clear understanding of what are the neurophysiological correlates (...)
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  40. Francesco Di Russo Grazia F. Spitoni, Rocco L. Cimmino, Chiara Bozzacchi, Luigi Pizzamiglio (2013). Modulation of Spontaneous Alpha Brain Rhythms Using Low-Intensity Transcranial Direct-Current Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) is a form of neurostimulation in which a constant, low current is delivered directly to the brain area of interest by small electrodes. The overall aim of this study was to examine and monitor the modulation of brain activity by electroencephalogram (EEG) in the frequency domain during tDCS in the resting state. To this end, we considered the modulation of spontaneous EEG to be a marker of the perturbation that was induced through the direct current (...)
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  41. Fabrice Jotterand, Shawn M. McClintock, Archie A. Alexander & Mustafa M. Husain (2010). Ethics and Informed Consent of Vagus Nerve Stimulation (VNS) for Patients with Treatment-Resistant Depression (TRD). Neuroethics 3 (1):13-22.score: 18.0
    Since the Nuremberg trials (1947–1949), informed consent has become central for ethical practice in patient care and biomedical research. Codes of ethics emanating from the Nuremberg Code (1947) recognize the importance of protecting patients and research subjects from abuses, manipulation and deception. Informed consent empowers individuals to autonomously and voluntarily accept or reject participation in either clinical treatment or research. In some cases, however, the underlying mental or physical condition of the individual may alter his or her cognitive abilities and (...)
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  42. Marco Zorzi Konstantinos Priftis, Marco Pitteri, Francesca Meneghello, Carlo Umiltà (2012). Optokinetic Stimulation Modulates Neglect for the Number Space: Evidence From Mental Number Interval Bisection. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 18.0
    Behavioral, neuropsychological, and neuroimaging data support the idea that numbers are represented along a mental number line (MNL), an analogical, visuo-spatial representation of number magnitude. The MNL is left-to-right oriented, with small numbers on the left and larger numbers on the right. Left neglect patients are impaired in processing the left side of the MNL and show a rightward deviation in the mental bisection of numerical intervals. In the present study we investigated the effects of optokinetic stimulation (OKS) -a (...)
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  43. C. Mathys, P. Loui, X. Zheng & G. Schlaug (2010). Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Applied to Heschl's Gyrus Modulates Pitch Discrimination. Frontiers in Psychology 1:193-193.score: 18.0
    The neural basis of the human brain's ability to discriminate pitch has been investigated by functional neuroimaging and the study of lesioned brains, indicating the critical importance of right and left Heschl's gyrus (HG) in pitch perception. Nonetheless, there remains some uncertainty with regard to localization and lateralization of pitch discrimination, partly because neuroimaging results do not allow us to draw inferences about the causality. To address the problem of causality in pitch discrimination functions, we used transcranial direct current (...) (tDCS) to downregulate (via cathodal stimulation) and upregulate (via anodal stimulation) excitability in either left or right auditory cortex and measured the effect on performance in a pitch discrimination task in comparison with sham stimulation. Cathodal stimulation of HG on the left and on the right hemispheres adversely affected pitch discrimination in comparison to sham stimulation, with the effect on the right being significantly stronger than on the left. Anodal stimulation on either side had no effect on performance in comparison to sham. Our results indicate that both left and right HG are causally involved in pitch discrimination, although the right auditory cortex might be a stronger contributor. (shrink)
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  44. Roi Cohen Kadosh Beatrix Krause, Javier Márquez-Ruiz (2013). The Effect of Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation: A Role for Cortical Excitation/Inhibition Balance? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) is a promising tool for cognitive enhancement and neurorehabilitation in clinical disorders in both cognitive and clinical domains (e.g., chronic pain, tinnitus). Here we suggest the potential role of tDCS in modulating cortical excitation/inhibition (E/I) balance and thereby inducing improvements. We suggest that part of the mechanism of action of tDCS can be explained by non-invasive modulations of the E/I balance.
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  45. Gottfried Schlaug Bradley W. Vines, Andrea C. Norton (2011). Non-Invasive Brain Stimulation Enhances the Effects of Melodic Intonation Therapy. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 18.0
    Research has suggested that a fronto-temporal network in the right hemisphere may be responsible for mediating Melodic Intonation Therapy’s positive effects on speech recovery. We investigated the potential for a non-invasive brain stimulation technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), to augment the benefits of MIT in patients with non-fluent aphasia by modulating neural activity in the brain during treatment with MIT. The polarity of the current applied to the scalp determines the effects of tDCS on the underlying tissue: (...)
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  46. Andrea Antal Catarina Saiote, Zsolt Turi, Walter Paulus (2013). Combining Functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Transcranial Electrical Stimulation. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Transcranial electrical stimulation (tES) is a neuromodulatory method with promising potential for basic research and as a therapeutic tool. The most explored type of tES is transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), but also transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) and transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS) have been shown to affect cortical excitability, behavioral performance and brain activity. Although providing indirect measure of brain activity, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can tell us more about the global effects of (...)
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  47. Daniel Strüber Christoph S. Herrmann, Stefan Rach, Toralf Neuling (2013). Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation: A Review of the Underlying Mechanisms and Modulation of Cognitive Processes. [REVIEW] Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Brain oscillations of different frequencies have been associated with a variety of cognitive functions. Convincing evidence supporting those associations has been provided by studies using intracranial stimulation, pharmacological interventions and lesion studies. The emergence of novel non-invasive brain stimulation techniques like repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) and transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) now allows to modulate brain oscillations directly. Particularly, tACS offers the unique opportunity to causally link brain oscillations of a specific frequency range to cognitive (...)
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  48. Bettina Pollok Claudia Wach, Vanessa Krause, Vera Moliadze, Walter Paulus, Alfons Schnitzler (2013). The Effect of 10 Hz Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation (tACS) on Corticomuscular Coherence. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:511-511.score: 18.0
    Synchronous oscillatory activity at alpha (8-12 Hz), beta (13-30 Hz), and gamma (30-90 Hz) fre-quencies is assumed to play a key role for motor control. Corticomuscular coherence (CMC) represents an established measure of the pyramidal system’s integrity. Transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) offers the possibility to modulate ongoing oscillatory activity. Behaviourally, 20 Hz tACS in healthy subjects has been shown to result in movement slowing. However, the neurophysiological changes underlying these effects are not entirely understood yet. The present study (...)
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  49. Lucas C. Parra Davide Reato, Asif Rahman, Marom Bikson (2013). Effects of Weak Transcranial Alternating Current Stimulation on Brain Activity—a Review of Known Mechanisms From Animal Studies. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    Rhythmic neuronal activity is ubiquitous in the human brain. These rhythms originate from a variety of different network mechanisms, which give rise to a wide-ranging spectrum of oscillation frequencies. In the last few years an increasing number of clinical research studies have explored transcranial alternating current stimulation (tACS) with weak current as a tool for affecting brain function. The premise of these interventions is that tACS will interact with ongoing brain oscillations. However, the exact mechanisms by which weak currents (...)
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  50. Tobias U. Hauser, Stephanie Rotzer, Roland H. Grabner, Susan Mérillat & Lutz Jäncke (2013). Enhancing Performance in Numerical Magnitude Processing and Mental Arithmetic Using Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 18.0
    The ability to accurately process numerical magnitudes and solve mental arithmetic is of highest importance for schooling and professional career. Although impairments in these domains in disorders such as developmental dyscalculia (DD) are highly detrimental, remediation is still sparse. In recent years, transcranial brain stimulation methods such as transcranial Direct Current Stimulation (tDCS) have been suggested as a treatment for various neurologic and neuropsychiatric disorders. The posterior parietal cortex (PPC) is known to be crucially involved in numerical magnitude (...)
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