Search results for '*Suffering' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Peter Carruthers (2004). Suffering Without Subjectivity. Philosophical Studies 121 (2):99-125.score: 16.0
    This paper argues that it is possible for suffering to occur in the absence of phenomenal consciousness – in the absence of a certain sort of experiential subjectivity, that is. (Phenomenal consciousness is the property that some mental states possess, when it is like something to undergo them, or when they have subjective feels, or possess qualia.) So even if theories of phenomenal consciousness that would withhold such consciousness from most species of non-human animal are correct, this neednt mean that (...)
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  2. Brooke Alan Trisel (2012). How Best to Prevent Future Persons From Suffering: A Reply to Benatar. South African Journal of Philosophy 31 (1):79-93.score: 16.0
    David Benatar claims that everyone was seriously harmed by coming into existence. To spare future persons from this suffering, we should cease having children, Benatar argues, with the result that humanity would gradually go extinct. Benatar’s claim of universal serious harm is baseless. Each year, an estimated 94% of children born throughout the world do not have a serious birth defect. Furthermore, studies show that most people do not experience chronic pain. Although nearly everyone experiences acute pain and discomforts, such (...)
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  3. Nancy M. Williams (2008). Affected Ignorance and Animal Suffering: Why Our Failure to Debate Factory Farming Puts Us at Moral Risk. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 21 (4):371-384.score: 16.0
    It is widely recognized that our social and moral environments influence our actions and belief formations. We are never fully immune to the effects of cultural membership. What is not clear, however, is whether these influences excuse average moral agents who fail to scrutinize conventional norms. In this paper, I argue that the lack of extensive public debate about factory farming and, its corollary, extreme animal suffering, is probably due, in part, to affected ignorance. Although a complex phenomenon because of (...)
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  4. Peter Nilsson (2011). On the Suffering of Compassion. Philosophia 39 (1):125-144.score: 16.0
    Compassion is often described in terms of suffering. This paper investigates the nature of this suffering. It is argued that compassion involves suffering of a particular kind. To begin with a case is made for the negative claim that compassion does not involve an ordinary, or afflictive, suffering over something. Secondly, it is argued that the suffering of compassion is a suffering for someone else’s sake: If you feel compassion for another person, P, then you suffer over P:s suffering for (...)
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  5. Jamie Mayerfeld (1999). Suffering and Moral Responsibility. Oxford University Press.score: 16.0
    In this work, Jamie Mayerfeld undertakes a careful inquiry into the meaning and moral significance of suffering. Understanding suffering in hedonistic terms as an affliction of feeling, he claims that it is an objective psychological condition, amenable to measurement and interpersonal comparison, although its accurate assessment is never easy. Mayerfeld goes on to examine the content of the duty to prevent suffering and the weight it has relative to other moral considerations. He argues that the prevention of suffering is morally (...)
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  6. Andrew Chignell (2001). Infant Suffering Revisited. Religious Studies 37 (4):475-484.score: 16.0
    I respond to two sets of objections to my characterization of infant suffering and the problem that it presents to traditional theism. My main theses were that infant suffering to death is not ‘horrendous’ in the technical sense defined, but that a good God still needs to "balance off" rather than "defeat" such suffering. David Basinger, on the other hand, claims that some infant suffering should be considered horrendous, while Nathan Nobis suggests that such suffering must be defeated rather than (...)
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  7. Yew-Kwang Ng (1995). Towards Welfare Biology: Evolutionary Economics of Animal Consciousness and Suffering. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 10 (3):255-285.score: 16.0
    Welfare biology is the study of living things and their environment with respect to their welfare (defined as net happiness, or enjoyment minus suffering). Despite difficulties of ascertaining and measuring welfare and relevancy to normative issues, welfare biology is a positive science. Evolutionary economics and population dynamics are used to help answer basic questions in welfare biology: Which species are affective sentients capable of welfare? Do they enjoy positive or negative welfare? Can their welfare be dramatically increased? Under plausible axioms, (...)
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  8. Henri Wijsbek (2012). 'To Thine Own Self Be True': On the Loss of Integrity as a Kind of Suffering. Bioethics 26 (1):1-7.score: 16.0
    One of the requirements in the Dutch regulation for euthanasia and assisted suicide is that the doctor must be satisfied ‘that the patient's suffering is unbearable, and that there is no prospect of improvement.’ In the notorious Chabot case, a psychiatrist assisted a 50 year old woman in suicide, although she did not suffer from any somatic disease, nor strictly speaking from any psychiatric condition. In Seduced by Death, Herbert Hendin concluded that apparently the Dutch regulation now allows physicians to (...)
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  9. Jocelyne Porcher (2011). The Relationship Between Workers and Animals in the Pork Industry: A Shared Suffering. Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 24 (1):3-17.score: 16.0
    Animal production, especially pork production, is facing growing international criticism. The greatest concerns relate to the environment, the animals’ living conditions, and the occupational diseases. But human and animal conditions are rarely considered together. Yet the living conditions at work and the emotional bond that inevitably forms bring the farm workers and the animals to live very close, which leads to shared suffering. Suffering does spread from animals to human beings and can cause workers physical, mental, and also moral suffering, (...)
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  10. Daryl Pullman (2002). Human Dignity and the Ethics and Aesthetics of Pain and Suffering. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (1):75-94.score: 16.0
    Inasmuch as unmitigated pain and suffering areoften thought to rob human beings of theirdignity, physicians and other care providersincur a special duty to relieve pain andsuffering when they encounter it. When pain andsuffering cannot be controlled it is sometimesthought that human dignity is compromised.Death, it is sometimes argued, would bepreferred to a life without dignity.Reasoning such as this trades on certainpreconceptions of the nature of pain andsuffering, and of their relationships todignity. The purpose of this paper is to laybare these (...)
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  11. Luc Boltanski (1999). Distant Suffering: Morality, Media, and Politics. Cambridge University Press.score: 16.0
    Distant Suffering examines the moral and political implications for a spectator of the distant suffering of others as presented through the media. What are the morally acceptable responses to the sight of suffering on television, for example, when the viewer cannot act directly to affect the circumstances in which the suffering takes place? Luc Boltanski argues that spectators can actively involve themselves and others by speaking about what they have seen and how they were affected by it. Developing ideas in (...)
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  12. Ulrich Diehl, Human Suffering as a Challenge for the Meaning of Life. Existenz. An International Journal in Philosophy, Religion, Politics, and the Arts.score: 16.0
    When people suffer they always suffer as a whole human being. The emotional, cognitive and spiritual suffering of human beings cannot be completely separated from all other kinds of suffering, such as from harmful natural, ecological, political, economic and social conditions. In reality they interact with each other and influence each other. Human beings do not only suffer from somatic illnesses, physical pain, and the lack of decent opportunities to satisfy their basic vital, social and emotional needs. They also suffer (...)
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  13. Lynn A. Jansen & Daniel P. Sulmasy (2002). Proportionality, Terminal Suffering and the Restorative Goals of Medicine. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (4-5):321-337.score: 16.0
    Recent years have witnessed a growing concern that terminally illpatients are needlessly suffering in the dying process. This has ledto demands that physicians become more attentive in the assessment ofsuffering and that they treat their patients as `whole persons.'' Forthe most part, these demands have not fallen on deaf ears. It is nowwidely accepted that the relief of suffering is one of the fundamentalgoals of medicine. Without question this is a positive development.However, while the importance of treating suffering has generally (...)
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  14. Eugene Thomas Long (2006). Suffering and Transcendence. International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 60 (1/3):139 - 148.score: 16.0
    This essay explores the experience of suffering in order to see to what extent it can be understood within the context of the human condition without diverting the reality of suffering or denying the meaning of human existence and divine reality. Particular attention is given to describing and interpreting what I call the transcendent dimensions of suffering with the intent of showing that in the experience of suffereing persons come up against the limits of what can be accounted for in (...)
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  15. Steven M. Duncan, Sin and Suffering.score: 16.0
    In this essay I discuss the concept of suffering, the causes of suffering, and the Christian solution to the problem of suffering. I conclude that there is no basis, within the Christian view of things, for raising the traditional problem of evil through reflection on the fact of substantial suffering in the world. I thus respectfully suggest that the problem of evil is only a problem for non-believers, who have the wrong perspective on the nature and source of suffering.
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  16. Steven D. Edwards (2003). Three Concepts of Suffering. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (1):59-66.score: 16.0
    This paper has three main aims. The first is to provide a critical assessment of two rival concepts of suffering, that proposed by Cassell and that proposed in this journal by van Hooft. The second aim of the paper is to sketch a more plausible concept of suffering, one which derives from a Wittgensteinian view of linguistic meaning. This more plausible concept is labeled an ‘intuitive concept’. The third aim is to assess the prospects for scientific understanding of suffering.
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  17. Stan van Hooft (1998). Suffering and the Goals of Medicine. Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):125-131.score: 16.0
    Taking as its starting point a recent statement of the Goals of Medicine published by the Hastings Centre, this paper argues against the dualistic distinction between pain and suffering. It uses an Aristotelian conception of the person to suggest that malady, pain, and disablement are objective forms of suffering not dependent upon any state of consciousness of the victim. As a result, medicine effectively relieves suffering when it cures malady and relieves pain. There is no medical mission to confront the (...)
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  18. Elisa Aaltola (2013). Skepticism, Empathy, and Animal Suffering. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (4):457-467.score: 16.0
    The suffering of nonhuman animals has become a noted factor in deciding public policy and legislative change. Yet, despite this growing concern, skepticism toward such suffering is still surprisingly common. This paper analyzes the merits of the skeptical approach, both in its moderate and extreme forms. In the first part it is claimed that the type of criterion for verification concerning the mental states of other animals posed by skepticism is overly (and, in the case of extreme skepticism, illogically) demanding. (...)
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  19. Oliver Leaman (1995). Evil and Suffering in Jewish Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.score: 16.0
    The problems of evil and suffering have been extensively discussed in Jewish philosophy, and much of the discussion has centred on the Book of Job. In this study Oliver Leaman poses two questions: how can a powerful and caring deity allow terrible things to happen to obviously innocent people, and why have the Jewish people been so harshly treated throughout history, given their status as the chosen people? He explores these issues through an analysis of the views of Philo, Saadya, (...)
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  20. Asma Abbas (2010). Liberalism and Human Suffering: Materialist Reflections on Politics, Ethics, and Aesthetics. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 16.0
    This book investigates the sources and implications of our encounters with suffering in contemporary politics and culture, exploring the forces that determine ...
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  21. Lilie Chouliaraki (2006). The Spectatorship of Suffering. Sage Publications.score: 16.0
    "The work is on an important topic that has been oft debated but rarely systematically studied – the political, cultural, and moral effects of distant news coverage of suffering. [The book] is extremely well steeped in the relevant literature, including semiotics, discourse analysis, meda and social theory and makes a fresh methodological contribution by looking at the codes and formats of news about suffering. It has a fresh vision and answer to some of the stickiest moral and media problems of (...)
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  22. James Davies (2011). Positive and Negative Models of Suffering: An Anthropology of Our Shifting Cultural Consciousness of Emotional Discontent. Anthropology of Consciousness 22 (2):188-208.score: 16.0
    I explore how many within modern industrial societies currently understand, manage, and respond to their emotional suffering. I argue that this understanding and management of suffering has radically altered in the last 30 years, creating a new model of suffering, “the negative model” (suffering is purposeless), which has largely replaced the “positive model” (suffering is purposeful) that prevailed in the 18th and 19th centuries. This shift has been hastened by what I call the “rationalization of suffering”—namely, the process by which (...)
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  23. Fernando Escalante Gonzalbo (2006). In the Eyes of God: A Study on the Culture of Suffering. University of Texas Press, Teresa Lozano Long Institute of Latin American Studies.score: 16.0
    "Every culture needs to appropriate the universal truth of human suffering," says Fernando Escalante, ". . . to give its own meaning to this suffering, so that human existence is bearable." Originally published in Spanish as La mirada de Dios: Estudios sobre la cultura del sufrimiento, this book is a remarkable study of the evolution of the culture of suffering and the different elements that constitute it, beginning with a reading of Rousseau and ending with the appearance of the Shoah (...)
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  24. H. Wheeler Robinson (1939). Suffering, Human and Divine. New York, the Macmillan Company.score: 16.0
    SUFFERING HUMAN AND DIVINE INTRODUCTION I KNEW when I asked Dr. H. Wheeler Robinson to write this volume on Suffering that I was giving him the most difficult ...
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  25. Bjørn Hofmann (2013). On the Downplay of Suffering in Nordenfelt's Theory of Illness. Health Care Analysis 21 (4):283-297.score: 16.0
    In his influential theory of health Nordenfelt bases the concepts of health and illness on the notions of ability and disability. A premise for this is that ability and disability provide a more promising, adequate, and useful basis than well-being and suffering. Nordenfelt uses coma and manic episodes as paradigm cases to show that this is so. Do these paradigm cases (and thus the premise) hold? What consequences does it have for the theory of health and illness if it they (...)
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  26. M. J. Siemińska, M. Szymańska & K. Mausch (2002). Development of Sensitivity to the Needs and Suffering of a Sick Person in Students of Medicine and Dentistry. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 5 (3):263-271.score: 16.0
    Doctor and patient meet in a circle of feelings determined by suffering. Sensitivity to the suffering is an axis determining the nature of the doctor and patient relationship. The patient's experience of an illness is individual, private, and very often difficult to describe. But the possibility to understand the suffering of another person comes from the fact that suffering is a universal feeling. We propose to enter the world of patient's experience by writing a letter to a doctor, which would (...)
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  27. Joshua M. Moritz (2014). Animal Suffering, Evolution, and the Origins of Evil: Toward a “Free Creatures” Defense. Zygon 49 (2):348-380.score: 16.0
    Does an affirmation of theistic evolution make the task of theodicy impossible? In this article, I will review a number of ancient and contemporary responses to the problem of evil as it concerns animal suffering and suggest a possible way forward which employs the ancient Jewish insight that evil—as resistance to God's will that results in suffering and alienation from God's purposes—precedes the arrival of human beings and already has a firm foothold in the nonhuman animal world long before humans (...)
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  28. Josep E. Corbí (2012/2011). Morality, Self-Knowledge, and Human Suffering: An Essay on the Loss of Confidence in the World. Routledge.score: 16.0
    Relying upon real life examples of human suffering--including torture, genocide, and warfare--as opposed to thought experiments, Corbi proposes a novel approach to self-knowledge that runs counter to standard Kantian approaches to morality.
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  29. Robert Francescotti (2013). The Problem of Animal Pain and Suffering. In Justin McBrayer Daniel Howard-Snyder (ed.), The Blackwell Companion to the Problem of Evil. 113-127.score: 16.0
    Here I discuss some theistic responses to the problem of animal pain and suffering with special attention to Michael Murray’s presentation in Nature Red in Tooth and Claw. The neo-Cartesian defenses he describes are reviewed, along with the appeal to nomic regularity and Murray’s emphasis on the progression of the universe from chaos to order. It is argued that despite these efforts to prove otherwise the problem of animal suffering remains a serious threat to the belief that an all-powerful, all-knowing, (...)
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  30. Renée Jeffery (2008). Evil and International Relations: Human Suffering in an Age of Terror. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 16.0
    Since the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001, the concept of 'evil' has enjoyed renewed popularity in both international political rhetoric and scholarly writing. World leaders, politicians, and intellectuals have increasingly turned to 'evil' to describe the very worst humanitarian atrocities that continue to mark international affairs. However, precisely what 'evil' actually entails is not well understood. Little consensus exists as to what 'evil' is, how it is manifested in the international sphere, and what we ought to do about it. (...)
     
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  31. Ian James Kidd (forthcoming). Transformative Suffering and the Cultivation of Virtue. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology.score: 16.0
    Anastasia Scrutton offers an attractive account of two Christian theologies of depression and argues, cogently and compellingly, that forms of potentially transformative theologies are therapeutically and philosophically superior. My double aim here is to try to cash out the operative notion of 'transformation' by focusing on two features: first its multimodal character (ethical, aesthetic, existential, spiritual) and, second, the theme of a realisation of 'dependence', 'grounding', or of being 'anchored' in the world. I suggest that these two themes of multimodality (...)
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  32. Bryan Frances (2013). Gratuitous Suffering and the Problem of Evil: A Comprehensive Introduction. Routledge.score: 14.0
    There are two “problems of evil” (actually, as we will see in chapter 2 there are three main ones, each with multiple variants, but that doesn't matter here). One, the “logical” one in Alston's terminology, is almost universally thought to be not at all ...
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  33. B. Bermond (2001). A Neuropsychological and Evolutionary Approach to Animal Consciousness and Animal Suffering. Animal Welfare Supplement 10:47- 62.score: 14.0
  34. Eric J. Cassell (2004). The Nature of Suffering and the Goals of Medicine. Oxford University Press.score: 14.0
    Here is a thoroughly updated edition of a classic in palliative medicine. Two new chapters have been added to the 1991 edition, along with a new preface summarizing where progress has been made and where it has not in the area of pain management. This book addresses the timely issue of doctor-patient relationships arguing that the patient, not the disease, should be the central focus of medicine. Included are a number of compelling patient narratives. Praise for the first edition "Well (...)
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  35. Jukka Varelius (2007). Illness, Suffering and Voluntary Euthanasia. Bioethics 21 (2):75–83.score: 14.0
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  36. Thaddeus Metz (2012). ’Giving the World a More Human Face’: Human Suffering in African Thought and Philosophy. In Jeff Malpas & Norelle Lickiss (eds.), Perspectives on Human Suffering. Springer. 49-62.score: 14.0
    I present ideas about human suffering that are salient among the black peoples of sub-Saharan Africa, reconstruct them in order to make them relevant to an international audience with philosophical interests, and urge that audience to give them consideration as alternatives or correctives to some dominant Western approaches. I first recount views commonly held by sub-Saharans about the nature, causes and cures of suffering, and then draw on them to articulate an account of it qua enervation, which rivals a neuro-physical (...)
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  37. Joseph Anthony Amato (1990). Victims and Values: A History and a Theory of Suffering. Greenwood Press.score: 14.0
    This book conducts a timely inquiry into contemporary conscience and politics.
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  38. J. Varelius (2014). Medical Expertise, Existential Suffering and Ending Life. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):104-107.score: 14.0
  39. Michalinos Zembylas (2009). Bearing Witness to the Ethics and Politics of Suffering: J. M. Coetzee's Disgrace, Inconsolable Mourning, and the Task of Educators. Studies in Philosophy and Education 28 (3):223-237.score: 14.0
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  40. J. Varelius (2014). On the Relevance of an Argument as Regards the Role of Existential Suffering in the End-of-Life Context. Journal of Medical Ethics 40 (2):114-116.score: 14.0
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  41. Charles John Bond (1937). The Nature and Meaning of Evil and Suffering as Seen From Evolutionary Standpoint. London, H. K. Lewis & Co., Ltd..score: 14.0
     
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  42. John Cowburn (1979). Shadows and the Dark: The Problems of Suffering and Evil. Scm Press.score: 14.0
     
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  43. John Cowburn (2012). The Problems of Suffering and Evil. Marquette University Press.score: 14.0
     
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  44. Sheldon Ekland-Olson (2011). How Ethical Systems Change: Tolerable Suffering and Assisted Dying. Routledge.score: 14.0
     
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  45. Vernon C. Harrington (1944). The Problem of Human Suffering Looked T From the Standpoint of a Christian. [Burlington, Vt.,The Lane Press.score: 14.0
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  46. Brian Hebblethwaite (1976). Evil, Suffering, and Religion. Hawthorn Books.score: 14.0
     
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  47. E. Stanley Jones (1933). Christ and Human Suffering. New York, [Etc.] Abingdon.score: 14.0
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  48. Louis Lavelle (1963). Evil and Suffering. New York, Macmillan.score: 14.0
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  49. Margaret E. Mohrmann & Mark J. Hanson (eds.) (1999). Pain Seeking Understanding: Suffering, Medicine, and Faith. Pilgrim Press.score: 14.0
  50. Petru Moldovan (2010). Israel Knohl Mesia dinainte de Iisus. Slujitorul pãtimitor de la Marea Moartã/ Mesia Before Jesus. The Suffering Servant from the Dead Sea. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 4 (10):246-247.score: 14.0
    Israel Knohl Mesia dinainte de Iisus. Slujitorul pãtimitor de la Marea Moartã Traducere de Ana-Elena Ilinca, Ed. Dacia, Cluj-Napoca, 2001.
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