Search results for '*Sustained Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. J. Lee, J. Ku, K. Han, J. Park, H. Lee, K. R. Kim, E. Lee, M. Husain, K. J. Yoon, I. Y. Kim, D. P. Jang & S. I. Kim (2012). rTMS Over Bilateral Inferior Parietal Cortex Induces Decrement of Spatial Sustained Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:26-26.score: 168.0
    Sustained attention is an essential brain function that enables a subject to maintain attention level over the time of a task. In previous work, the right inferior parietal lobe (IPL) has been reported as one of the main brain regions related to sustained attention, however, the right lateralization of vigilance/sustained attention is unclear because information about the network for sustained attention is traditionally provided by neglect patients who typically have right brain damage. Here, we investigated (...)
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  2. Katja Saupe, Erich Schröger, Søen K. Andersen & Matthias M. Müller (2009). Neural Mechanisms of Intermodal Sustained Selective Attention with Concurrently Presented Auditory and Visual Stimuli. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3:58.score: 148.0
    We investigated intermodal attention effects on the auditory steady-state response (ASSR) and the steady-state visual evoked potential (SSVEP). For this purpose, 40 Hz amplitude modulated tones and a stream of flickering (7.5 Hz) random letters were presented concurrently. By means of an auditory or visual target detection task, participants’ attention was directed to the respective modality for several seconds. Attention to the auditory stream led to a significant enhancement of the ASSR compared to when the visual stream (...)
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  3. J. Smallwood, J. B. Davies, D. Heim, F. Finnigan, M. Sudberry & Obonsawin M. O'Connor R. (2004). Subjective Experience and the Attentional Lapse: Task Engagement and Disengagement During Sustained Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):657-90.score: 147.0
  4. Glenn Gunzelmann, Joshua B. Gross, Kevin A. Gluck & David F. Dinges (2009). Sleep Deprivation and Sustained Attention Performance: Integrating Mathematical and Cognitive Modeling. Cognitive Science 33 (5):880-910.score: 115.0
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  5. Jan B. Engelmann, Eswar Damaraju, Srikanth Padmala & Luiz Pessoa (2009). Combined Effects of Attention and Motivation on Visual Task Performance: Transient and Sustained Motivational Effects. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 112.0
    We investigated how the brain integrates motivational and attentional signals by using a neuroimaging paradigm that provided separate estimates for transient cue- and target-related signals, in addition to sustained block-related responses. Participants performed a Posner-type task in which an endogenous cue predicted target location on 70% of trials, while motivation was manipulated by varying magnitude and valence of a cash incentive linked to task performance. Our findings revealed increased detection performance (d’) as a function of incentive value. In parallel, brain (...)
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  6. Tom Manly & Ian H. Robertson (2005). The Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART). In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press. 337--338.score: 110.0
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  7. William S. Helton, Rosalie P. Kern & Donieka R. Walker (2009). Conscious Thought and the Sustained Attention to Response Task. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):600-607.score: 105.0
  8. J. Smallwood, L. Riby, D. Heim & J. Davies (2006). Encoding During the Attentional Lapse: Accuracy of Encoding During the Semantic Sustained Attention to Response Task. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):218-231.score: 105.0
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  9. William S. Helton, Lena Weil, Annette Middlemiss & Andrew Sawers (2010). Global Interference and Spatial Uncertainty in the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):77-85.score: 105.0
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  10. Jonathan Smallwood, John B. Davies, Derek Heim, Frances Finnigan, Megan Sudberry, Rory O'Connor & Marc Obonsawin (2004). Subjective Experience and the Attentional Lapse: Task Engagement and Disengagement During Sustained Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):657-690.score: 100.0
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  11. Leonard M. Giambra, Reginald E. Quilter, Pamela B. Phillips & Barbara S. Hiscock (1988). Performance on a Sustained Attention Task as a Function of Strategy: A Cross-Sectional Investigation Using the Mackworth Clock-Test. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (4):333-335.score: 100.0
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  12. James Head & William S. Helton (2012). Natural Scene Stimuli and Lapses of Sustained Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1617-1625.score: 100.0
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  13. Jonathan B. Banks, Jaime L. Tartar & Matthew S. Welhaf (2014). Where's the Impairment: An Examination of Factors That Impact Sustained Attention Following a Stressor. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):856-866.score: 100.0
  14. Cohen Michael (2011). Disentangling Different Types of Errors: EEG Dynamics of Response Conflict Versus Lapses in Sustained Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 100.0
  15. P. Bisiacchi & M. Proverbio (1991). Visuospatial Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):511-511.score: 100.0
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  16. Levine B. (2010). Sustained Attention and the Use of Alerting Tones After Traumatic Brain Injury: An fMRI Study. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 100.0
  17. Johnson Katherine, Healy Elaine, Dooley Barbara, Kelly Simon & McNicholas Fiona (2013). Children Born with Very Low Birth Weight Show Difficulties with Sustained Attention but Not Response Inhibition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 100.0
  18. David O. Richter, Roderick J. Senter & Joel S. Warm (1981). Effects of the Rate and Regularity of Background Events on Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (4):207-210.score: 100.0
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  19. Joel S. Warm, Donald A. Schumsky & Douglas K. Hawley (1976). Ear Asymmetry and the Temporal Uncertainty of Signals in Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (5):413-416.score: 100.0
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  20. Joel S. Warm, David O. Richter, Ronald L. Sprague, Phillip K. Porter & Donald A. Schumsky (1980). Listening with a Dual Brain: Hemispheric Asymmetry in Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (4):229-232.score: 100.0
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  21. Alexandra B. Morrison, Merissa Goolsarran, Scott L. Rogers & Amishi P. Jha (2013). Taming a Wandering Attention: Short-Form Mindfulness Training in Student Cohorts. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:897.score: 88.0
    Mindfulness training (MT) is a form of mental training in which individuals engage in exercises to cultivate an attentive, present centered, and non-reactive mental mode. The present study examines the putative benefits of MT in University students for whom mind wandering can interfere with learning and academic success. We tested the hypothesis that short-form MT (7 hours over 7 weeks) contextualized for the challenges and concerns of University students may reduce mind wandering and improve working memory. Performance on the sustained (...)
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  22. Mary Lynne Dittmar, Daniel B. Berch & Joel S. Warm (1982). Sustained Visual Attention in Deaf and Hearing Adults. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (6):339-342.score: 80.0
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  23. David Burr Roberto Arrighi, Roy Lunardi (2011). Vision and Audition Do Not Share Attentional Resources in Sustained Tasks. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 68.0
    Our perceptual capacities are limited by attentional resources. One important question is whether these resources are allocated separately to each sense or shared between them. We addressed this issue by asking subjects to perform a double task, either in the same modality or in different modalities (vision and audition). The primary task was a multiple object-tracking task (Pylyshyn & Storm, 1988), in which observers were required to track between 2-5 dots for 4 seconds. Concurrently, they were required to identify either (...)
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  24. Robyn J. Cohen & John E. Calamari (2004). Thought-Focused Attention and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms: An Evaluation of Cognitive Self-Consciousness in a Nonclinical Sample. Cognitive Therapy and Research 28 (4):457-471.score: 67.0
     
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  25. Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 57.0
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor that the (...)
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  26. Terje Sagvolden, Espen Borgå Johansen, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell (2005). A Dynamic Developmental Theory of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Predominantly Hyperactive/Impulsive and Combined Subtypes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):397-419.score: 46.0
    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Inattentiveness, overactivity, and impulsiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. The dynamic developmental behavioral theory is based on the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic function plays a pivotal role by failing to modulate nondopaminergic (primarily glutamate and GABA) signal transmission appropriately. A hypofunctioning mesolimbic dopamine branch produces altered reinforcement of behavior and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior. This gives rise to (...)
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  27. Anthony P. Zanesco, Brandon G. King, Katherine A. MacLean & Clifford D. Saron (2013). Executive Control and Felt Concentrative Engagement Following Intensive Meditation Training. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7 (566).score: 40.0
    Various forms of mental training have been shown to improve performance on cognitively demanding tasks. Individuals trained in meditative practices, for example, show generalized improvements on a variety of tasks assessing attentional performance. A central claim of this training, derived from contemplative traditions, posits that improved attentional performance is accompanied by subjective increases in the stability and clarity of concentrative engagement with one’s object of focus, as well as reductions in felt cognitive effort as expertise develops. However, despite frequent claims (...)
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  28. Fionnuala Catherine Murphy, Kirsty Macpherson, Trisha Jeyabalasingham, Tom Manly & Barnaby D. Dunn (2013). Modulating Mind-Wandering in Dysphoria. Frontiers in Psychology 4:888.score: 40.0
    Depression is associated with significant difficulty staying ‘in the moment’ as the mind tends to wander away from current activity to focus instead on personal concerns. Mind-wandering (MW) may in some instances be a precursor for depressive rumination, a thinking style believed to confer vulnerability to the likelihood and extent of depression. Though the majority of evidence examining MW and mood has been correlational, evidence indicates that MW may be not only a consequence but also a cause of low mood. (...)
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  29. Paul Seli, Tanya R. Jonker, James Allan Cheyne & Daniel Smilek (2013). Enhancing SART Validity by Statistically Controlling Speed-Accuracy Trade-Offs. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 40.0
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  30. Maja Stikic, Robin R. Johnson, Daniel J. Levendowski, Djordje P. Popovic, Richard E. Olmstead & Chris Berka (2011). Eeg-Derived Estimators of Present and Future Cognitive Performance. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.score: 40.0
  31. Adam Moore, Thomas Gruber, Jennifer Derose & Peter Malinowski (2012). Regular, Brief Mindfulness Meditation Practice Improves Electrophysiological Markers of Attentional Control. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 36.0
    Mindfulness based meditation practices involve various attentional skills, including the ability to sustain and focus ones attention. During a simple mindful breathing practice, sustained attention is required to maintain focus on the breath while cognitive control is required to detect mind wandering. We thus hypothesized that regular, brief mindfulness training would result in improvements in the self regulation of attention and foster changes in neuronal activity related to attentional control. A longitudinal randomized control group EEG study was (...)
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  32. Julien Dubois R. VanRullen, N. A. Busch, J. Drewes (2011). Ongoing EEG Phase as a Trial-by-Trial Predictor of Perceptual and Attentional Variability. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 36.0
    Even in well-controlled laboratory environments, apparently identical repetitions of an experimental trial can give rise to highly variable perceptual outcomes and behavioral responses. This variability is generally discarded as a reflection of intrinsic noise in neuronal systems. However, part of this variability may be accounted for by trial-by-trial fluctuations of the phase of ongoing oscillations at the moment of stimulus presentation. For example, the phase of an electro-encephalogram (EEG) oscillation reflecting the rapid waxing and waning of sustained attention can (...)
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  33. James Stuart Peter Macdonald, Santosh Mathan & Nick Yeung (2011). Trial-by-Trial Variations in Subjective Attentional State Are Reflected in Ongoing Prestimulus EEG Alpha Oscillations. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 32.0
    Parieto-occipital EEG alpha power and subjective reports of attentional state are both associated with visual attention and awareness, but little is currently known about the relationship between these two measures. Here, we bring together these two literatures to explore the relationship between alpha activity and participants’ introspective judgements of attentional state as each varied from trial to trial during performance of a visual detection task. We collected participants’ subjective ratings of perceptual decision confidence and attentional state on continuous scales (...)
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  34. Barbara G. Shinn-Cunningham Inyong Choi, Siddharth Rajaram, Lenny A. Varghese (2013). Quantifying Attentional Modulation of Auditory-Evoked Cortical Responses From Single-Trial Electroencephalography. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 32.0
    Selective auditory attention is essential for human listeners to be able to communicate in multi-source environments. Selective attention is known to modulate the neural representation of the auditory scene, boosting the representation of a target sound relative to the background, but the strength of this modulation, and the mechanisms contributing to it, are not well understood. Here, listeners performed a behavioral experiment demanding sustained, focused spatial auditory attention while we measured cortical responses using electroencephalography (EEG). We presented (...)
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  35. Steve Most, Brian J. Scholl, E. Clifford & Daniel J. Simons (2005). What You See is What You Set: Sustained Inattentional Blindness and the Capture of Awareness. Psychological Review 112 (1):217-242.score: 28.0
  36. Wendy Hasenkamp & Lawrence W. Barsalou (2012). Effects of Meditation Experience on Functional Connectivity of Distributed Brain Networks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 28.0
    This study sought to examine the effect of meditation experience on brain networks underlying cognitive actions employed during contemplative practice. In a previous study, we proposed a basic model of naturalistic cognitive fluctuations that occur during the practice of focused attention meditation. This model specifies four intervals in a cognitive cycle: mind wandering, awareness of mind wandering, shifting of attention, and sustained attention. Using subjective input from experienced practitioners during meditation, we identified activity in salience network regions (...)
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  37. Chandan J. Vaidya Xiaozhen You, Megan Norr, Eric Murphy, Emily S. Kuschner, Elgiz Bal, William D. Gaillard, Lauren Kenworthy (2013). Atypical Modulation of Distant Functional Connectivity by Cognitive State in Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 28.0
    We examined whether modulation of functional connectivity by cognitive state differed between pre-adolescent children with Autism Spectrum Disorders (ASD) and age and IQ-matched control children. Children underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) during two states, a resting state followed by a sustained attention task. A voxel-wise method was used to characterize functional connectivity at two levels, local (within a voxel’s 14 mm neighborhood) and distant (outside of the voxel’s 14 mm neighborhood to the rest of the brain) and regions (...)
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  38. Declan Smithies (2011). Attention is Rational-Access Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 247--273.score: 27.0
    This chapter argues that attention is a distinctive mode of consciousness, which plays an essential functional role in making information accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action. The main line of argument can be stated quite simply. Attention is what makes information fully accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action. But what makes information fully accessible for use in the rational control of thought and action is a distinctive mode of (...)
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  39. Sebastian Watzl (2011). Attention as Structuring of the Stream of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 145.score: 27.0
    This paper defends and develops the structuring account of conscious attention: attention is the conscious mental process of structuring one’s stream of consciousness so that some parts of it are more central than others. In the first part of the paper, I motivate the structuring account. Drawing on a variety of resources I argue that the phenomenology of attention cannot be fully captured in terms of how the world appears to the subject, as well as against an (...)
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  40. Brian Bruya (2010). Introduction: Toward a Theory of Attention That Includes Effortless Attention. In , Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press.score: 27.0
    In this Introduction, I identify seven discrete aspects of attention brought to the fore by by considering the phenomenon of effortless attention: effort, decision-making, action syntax, agency, automaticity, expertise, and mental training. For each, I provide an overview of recent research, identify challenges to or gaps in current attention theory with respect to it, consider how attention theory can be advanced by including current research, and explain how relevant chapters of this volume offer such advances.
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  41. Christopher Peacocke (2005). Joint Attention: Its Nature, Reflexivity, and Relation to Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 298.score: 27.0
    The openness of joint awareness between two or more subjects is a perceptual phenomenon. It involves a certain mutual awareness between the subjects, an awareness that makes reference to that very awareness itself. Properly characterized, such awareness can generate iterated awareness ‘x is aware that y is aware that x is aware...’ to whatever level the subjects can sustain. The openness should not be characterized in terms of Lewis–Schiffer common knowledge, the conditions for which are not met in many basic (...)
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  42. Naomi M. Eilan (2005). Joint Attention, Communication, and Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 1.score: 27.0
    This chapter argues that a central division among accounts of joint attention, both in philosophy and developmental psychology, turns on how they address two questions: What, if any, is the connection between the capacity to engage in joint attention triangles and the capacity to grasp the idea of objective truth? How do we explain the kind of openness or sharing of minds that occurs in joint attention? The chapter explores the connections between answers to both questions, and (...)
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  43. Johannes Roessler (2005). Joint Attention and the Problem of Other Minds. In Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.score: 27.0
    The question of what it means to be aware of others as subjects of mental states is often construed as the question of how we are epistemically justified in attributing mental states to others. The dominant answer to this latter question is that we are so justified in virtue of grasping the role of mental states in explaining observed behaviour. This chapter challenges this picture and formulates an alternative by reflecting on the interpretation of early joint attention interactions. It (...)
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  44. John Campbell (2005). Joint Attention and Common Knowledge. In Naomi M. Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 287--297.score: 27.0
    This chapter makes the case for a relational version of an experientialist view of joint attention. On an experientialist view of joint attention, shifting from solitary attention to joint attention involves a shift in the nature of your perceptual experience of the object attended to. A relational analysis of such a view explains the latter shift in terms of the idea that, in joint attention, it is a constituent of your experience that the other person (...)
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  45. Jane Heal (2005). Joint Attention and Understanding the Mind. In N. Elian, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.), Oxford University PressJoint Attention: Communication and Other Minds. Oxford University Press. 34--44.score: 27.0
    It is plausible to think, as many developmental psychologists do, that joint attention is important in the development of getting a full grasp on psychological notions. This chapter argues that this role of joint attention is best understood in the context of the simulation theory about the nature of psychological understanding rather than in the context of the theory. Episodes of joint attention can then be seen not as good occasions for learning a theory of mind but (...)
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  46. Brian Bruya (2010). Apertures, Draw, and Syntax: Remodeling Attention. In , Effortless Attention: A New Perspective in the Cognitive Science of Attention and Action. MIT Press. 219.score: 27.0
    Because psychological studies of attention and cognition are most commonly performed within the strict confines of the laboratory or take cognitively impaired patients as subjects, it is difficult to be sure that resultant models of attention adequately account for the phenomenon of effortless attention. The problem is not only that effortless attention is resistant to laboratory study. A further issue is that because the laboratory is the most common way to approach attention, models resulting from (...)
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  47. Christopher Mole (2011). The Metaphysics of Attention. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press. 60-77.score: 27.0
    This paper gives a brief presentation of adverbialism about attention, and explains some of the reasons why it gives an appealing account of attention's metaphysics.
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  48. Antoine Lutz, Mental Training Enhances Attentional Stability: Neural and Behavioral Evidence.score: 26.0
    The capacity to stabilize the content of attention over time varies among individuals, and its impairment is a hallmark of several mental illnesses. Impairments in sustained attention in patients with attention disorders have been associated with increased trial-to-trial variability in reaction time and event-related potential deficits during attention tasks. At present, it is unclear whether the ability to sustain attention and its underlying brain circuitry are transformable through training. Here, we show, with dichotic listening task (...)
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  49. Christopher Mole (2008). Attention and Consciousness. Journal of Consciousness Studies 15 (4):86-104.score: 24.0
    According to commonsense psychology, one is conscious of everything that one pays attention to, but one does not pay attention to all the things that one is conscious of. Recent lines of research purport to show that commonsense is mistaken on both of these points: Mack and Rock (1998) tell us that attention is necessary for consciousness, while Kentridge and Heywood (2001) claim that consciousness is not necessary for attention. If these lines of research were successful (...)
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  50. Wayne Wu (2011). What is Conscious Attention? Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):93-120.score: 24.0
    Perceptual attention is essential to both thought and agency, for there is arguably no demonstrative thought or bodily action without it. Psychologists and philosophers since William James have taken attention to be a ubiquitous and distinctive form of consciousness, one that leaves a characteristic mark on perceptual experience. As a process of selecting specific perceptual inputs, attention influences the way things perceptually appear. It may then seem that it is a specific feature of perceptual representation that constitutes (...)
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