Search results for '*Sustained Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  19
    J. Smallwood, J. B. Davies, D. Heim, F. Finnigan, M. Sudberry & Obonsawin M. O'Connor R. (2004). Subjective Experience and the Attentional Lapse: Task Engagement and Disengagement During Sustained Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):657-90.
    Three experiments investigated the relationship between subjective experience and attentional lapses during sustained attention. These experiments employed two measures of subjective experience to examine how differences in awareness correspond to variations in both task performance and psycho-physiological measures . This series of experiments examine these phenomena during the Sustained Attention to Response Task . The results suggest we can dissociate between two components of subjective experience during sustained attention: task unrelated thought which corresponds to an absent minded (...)
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  2.  7
    William S. Helton, Rosalie P. Kern & Donieka R. Walker (2009). Conscious Thought and the Sustained Attention to Response Task. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):600-607.
    We investigated the properties of the sustained attention to response task . In the SART, participants respond to frequent neutral signals and are required to withhold response to rare critical signals. We examined whether SART performance shows characteristics of speed–accuracy tradeoffs and in addition, we examined whether SART performance is influenced by prior exposure to emotional picture stimuli. Thirty-six participants in this study performed SARTs after being exposed to neutral and negative picture stimuli. Performance in the SART changed rapidly (...)
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  3. William S. Helton, Lena Weil, Annette Middlemiss & Andrew Sawers (2010). Global Interference and Spatial Uncertainty in the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):77-85.
    The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a Go–No-Go signal detection task developed to measure lapses of sustained conscious attention. In this study, we examined the impact global interference and spatial uncertainty has on SART performance. Ten participants performed either a SART or a traditionally formatted version of a global–local stimuli detection task with spatially certain and uncertain signals. Reaction time in the SART was insensitive to global interference and spatial uncertainty, whereas reaction time in the low-Go task (...)
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  4.  9
    James Head & William S. Helton (2012). Natural Scene Stimuli and Lapses of Sustained Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (4):1617-1625.
    We conducted two experiments using naturalistic scene stimuli to test the resource theory and mindlessness theory of sustained attention. In experiment 1, 28 participants completed a traditional formatted vigilance task consisting of non-repeating forest or urban picture stimuli as target stimuli. Participants filled out pre- and post-task assessments of arousal and conscious thoughts. There was still a vigilance decrement, despite non-repetitive, natural target stimuli. Participants found the task demanding and were actively engaged in the task. In experiment 2, 25 (...)
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  5.  2
    J. Smallwood, L. Riby, D. Heim & J. Davies (2006). Encoding During the Attentional Lapse: Accuracy of Encoding During the Semantic Sustained Attention to Response Task. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (1):218-231.
    An experiment investigated the relationship between the ability to encode verbal stimuli during an attentional lapse. The task employed a variation on the sustained attention to response task which involved the detection of an infrequent target against a background of words. As a manipulation, participants were either instructed to encode the stimuli or were merely exposed to the stimuli. Retrieval was measured using process dissociation. Irrespective of the instructions given to the participants during the task, participants were more likely (...)
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  6.  21
    Jonathan Smallwood, John B. Davies, Derek Heim, Frances Finnigan, Megan Sudberry, Rory O'Connor & Marc Obonsawin (2004). Subjective Experience and the Attentional Lapse: Task Engagement and Disengagement During Sustained Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):657-690.
    Three experiments investigated the relationship between subjective experience and attentional lapses during sustained attention. These experiments employed two measures of subjective experience to examine how differences in awareness correspond to variations in both task performance and psycho-physiological measures . This series of experiments examine these phenomena during the Sustained Attention to Response Task . The results suggest we can dissociate between two components of subjective experience during sustained attention: task unrelated thought which corresponds to an absent minded (...)
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  7.  6
    Glenn Gunzelmann, Joshua B. Gross, Kevin A. Gluck & David F. Dinges (2009). Sleep Deprivation and Sustained Attention Performance: Integrating Mathematical and Cognitive Modeling. Cognitive Science 33 (5):880-910.
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  8. Tom Manly & Ian H. Robertson (2005). The Sustained Attention to Response Test (SART). In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press 337--338.
  9.  2
    Jonathan B. Banks, Jaime L. Tartar & Matthew S. Welhaf (2014). Where's the Impairment: An Examination of Factors That Impact Sustained Attention Following a Stressor. Cognition and Emotion 28 (5):856-866.
  10.  5
    Michael S. Clayton, Nick Yeung & Roi Cohen Kadosh (2015). The Roles of Cortical Oscillations in Sustained Attention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 19 (4):188-195.
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  11.  1
    Christian Grillon, Oliver J. Robinson, Ambika Mathur & Monique Ernst (forthcoming). Effect of Attention Control on Sustained Attention During Induced Anxiety. Cognition and Emotion:1-13.
  12. Joel S. Warm, Donald A. Schumsky & Douglas K. Hawley (1976). Ear Asymmetry and the Temporal Uncertainty of Signals in Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 7 (5):413-416.
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  13.  2
    Leonard M. Giambra, Reginald E. Quilter, Pamela B. Phillips & Barbara S. Hiscock (1988). Performance on a Sustained Attention Task as a Function of Strategy: A Cross-Sectional Investigation Using the Mackworth Clock-Test. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (4):333-335.
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  14. P. Bisiacchi & M. Proverbio (1991). Visuospatial Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 29 (6):511-511.
  15. David O. Richter, Roderick J. Senter & Joel S. Warm (1981). Effects of the Rate and Regularity of Background Events on Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 18 (4):207-210.
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  16. Joel S. Warm, David O. Richter, Ronald L. Sprague, Phillip K. Porter & Donald A. Schumsky (1980). Listening with a Dual Brain: Hemispheric Asymmetry in Sustained Attention. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 15 (4):229-232.
  17.  3
    Mary Lynne Dittmar, Daniel B. Berch & Joel S. Warm (1982). Sustained Visual Attention in Deaf and Hearing Adults. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (6):339-342.
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  18. Robyn J. Cohen & John E. Calamari (2004). Thought-Focused Attention and Obsessive-Compulsive Symptoms: An Evaluation of Cognitive Self-Consciousness in a Nonclinical Sample. Cognitive Therapy and Research 28 (4):457-471.
  19.  95
    Naomi Eilan, Christoph Hoerl, Teresa McCormack & Johannes Roessler (eds.) (2005). Joint Attention: Communication and Other Minds: Issues in Philosophy and Psychology. Oxford: Clarendon Press.
    Sometime around their first birthday most infants begin to engage in relatively sustained bouts of attending together with their caretakers to objects in their environment. By the age of 18 months, on most accounts, they are engaging in full-blown episodes of joint attention. As developmental psychologists (usually) use the term, for such joint attention to be in play, it is not sufficient that the infant and the adult are in fact attending to the same object, nor that the (...)
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  20.  1
    Paul Seli, James Allan Cheyne & Daniel Smilek (2012). Attention Failures Versus Misplaced Diligence: Separating Attention Lapses From Speed–Accuracy Trade-Offs. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):277-291.
    In two studies of a GO–NOGO task assessing sustained attention, we examined the effects of altering speed–accuracy trade-offs through instructions and auditory alerts distributed throughout the task. Instructions emphasizing accuracy reduced errors and changed the distribution of GO trial RTs. Additionally, correlations between errors and increasing RTs produced a U-function; excessively fast and slow RTs accounted for much of the variance of errors. Contrary to previous reports, alerts increased errors and RT variability. The results suggest that standard instructions for (...)
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  21. Katalin Varga, Zoltán Németh & Anna Szekely (2011). Lack of Correlation Between Hypnotic Susceptibility and Various Components of Attention. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1872-1881.
    The purpose of our study was to measure the relationship between performance on various attentional tasks and hypnotic susceptibility. Healthy volunteers participated in a study, where they had to perform several tasks measuring various attention components in a waking state: sustained attention, selective or focused attention, divided attention and executive attention in task switching. Hypnotic susceptibility was measured in a separate setting by the Waterloo-Stanford Groups Scale of Hypnotic Susceptibility, Form C .We found no significant (...)
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  22.  34
    Terje Sagvolden, Espen Borgå Johansen, Heidi Aase & Vivienne Ann Russell (2005). A Dynamic Developmental Theory of Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Predominantly Hyperactive/Impulsive and Combined Subtypes. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):397-419.
    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is currently defined as a cognitive/behavioral developmental disorder where all clinical criteria are behavioral. Inattentiveness, overactivity, and impulsiveness are presently regarded as the main clinical symptoms. The dynamic developmental behavioral theory is based on the hypothesis that altered dopaminergic function plays a pivotal role by failing to modulate nondopaminergic (primarily glutamate and GABA) signal transmission appropriately. A hypofunctioning mesolimbic dopamine branch produces altered reinforcement of behavior and deficient extinction of previously reinforced behavior. This gives (...)
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  23.  71
    Steve Most, Daniel J. Simons, Brian J. Scholl & Christopher Chabris (2000). Sustained Inattentional Blindness: The Role of Location in the Detection of Unexpected Dynamic Events. Psyche 6 (14).
    Attempts to understand visual attention have produced models based on location, in which attention selects particular regions of space, and models based on other visual attributes . Previous studies of inattentional blindness have contributed to our understanding of attention by suggesting that the detection of an unexpected object depends on the distance of that object from the spatial focus of attention. When the distance of a briefly flashed object from both fixation and the focus of (...) is systematically varied, detection appears to have a location-based component. However, the likelihood that people will detect an unexpected event in sustained and dynamic displays may depend on more than just spatial location. We investigated the influence of spatial location on inattentional blindness under precisely controlled, sustained and dynamic conditions. We found that although location-based models cannot fully account for the detection of unexpected objects, spatial location does play a role even when displays are visible for an extended period. (shrink)
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  24.  75
    Steve Most, Brian J. Scholl, E. Clifford & Daniel J. Simons (2005). What You See is What You Set: Sustained Inattentional Blindness and the Capture of Awareness. Psychological Review 112 (1):217-242.
  25.  49
    James A. Cheyne, Jonathan S. A. Carriere & Daniel Smilek (2006). Absent-Mindedness: Lapses of Conscious Awareness and Everyday Cognitive Failures. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):578-592.
    A brief self-report scale was developed to assess everyday performance failures arising directly or primarily from brief failures of sustained attention . The ARCES was found to be associated with a more direct measure of propensity to attention lapses and to errors on an existing behavioral measure of sustained attention . Although the ARCES and MAAS were highly correlated, structural modelling revealed the ARCES was more directly related to SART errors and the MAAS to SART RTs, (...)
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  26.  26
    David LaBerge (2006). Apical Dendrite Activity in Cognition and Consciousness. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):235-257.
    The ongoing steady nature of consciousness in everyday life implies that the underlying neural activity possesses a high level of stability. The prolonged cognitive events of sustained attention, imagery, and working memory also imply high stability of underlying neural activity. This paper proposes that stabilization of neural activity is produced by apical dendrite activity in pyramidal neurons within recurrent corticothalamic circuits, and proposes that the wave activities of apical dendrites that stabilize ongoing activity constitute the subjective impressions of (...)
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  27.  9
    D. Schneider, V. P. Slaughter, A. P. Bayliss & P. E. Dux (2013). A Temporally Sustained Implicit Theory of Mind Deficit in Autism Spectrum Disorders. Cognition 129 (2):410-417.
    Eye movements during false-belief tasks can reveal an individual's capacity to implicitly monitor others' mental states (theory of mind - ToM). It has been suggested, based on the results of a single-trial-experiment, that this ability is impaired in those with a high-functioning autism spectrum disorder (ASD), despite neurotypical-like performance on explicit ToM measures. However, given there are known attention differences and visual hypersensitivities in ASD it is important to establish whether such impairments are evident over time. (...)
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  28. Stephen White (2000). Pay Attention! Achtung! Electronic Media and the Ethos of Dialogue in Late Modern Democracy. Ethical Perspectives 7 (2-3):151-161.
    A plausible scenario for the future of electronic mass media news goes something like this. On the one hand, there will be the nightly television news, some of it brought to us by public entities and some by private, increasingly concentrated, corporate entities. On the other hand, there will be continually streaming sources of news available over the internet; and each of us will be able to construct, in effect, a tailor-made, continually revisable package of news. What I want to (...)
     
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  29.  20
    Antoine Lutz, Mental Training Enhances Attentional Stability: Neural and Behavioral Evidence.
    The capacity to stabilize the content of attention over time varies among individuals, and its impairment is a hallmark of several mental illnesses. Impairments in sustained attention in patients with attention disorders have been associated with increased trial-to-trial variability in reaction time and event-related potential deficits during attention tasks. At present, it is unclear whether the ability to sustain attention and its underlying brain circuitry are transformable through training. Here, we show, with dichotic listening task (...)
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  30.  10
    Robert S. Rubin, Erich C. Dierdorff & Michael E. Brown (2010). Do Ethical Leaders Get Ahead? Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):215-236.
    Despite sustained attention to ethical leadership in organizations, scholarship remains largely descriptive. This study employs an empirical approach to examine the consequences of ethical leadership on leader promotability. From a sample of ninety-six managers from two independent organizations, we found that ethical leaders were increasingly likely to be rated by their superior as exhibiting potential to reach senior leadership positions. However, leaders who displayed increased ethical leadership were no more likely to be viewed as promotable in the near-term compared (...)
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  31. Dustin Stokes, Attention and the Cognitive Penetrability of Perception.
    One sceptical rejoinder to those who claim that sensory perception is cognitively penetrable is to appeal to the involvement of attention. So, while a phenomenon might initially look like one where, say, a perceiver’s beliefs are influencing her visual experience, another interpretation is that because the perceiver believes and desires as she does, she consequently shifts her spatial attention so as to change what she senses visually. But, the sceptic will urge, this is an entirely familiar (...)
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  32.  1
    Nantu Hu, Sheng He & Baihua Xu (2012). Different Efficiencies of Attentional Orienting in Different Wandering Minds. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (1):139-148.
    This study examined the relations between properties of attentional networks and Mind Wandering across individuals. For the attentional networks, we measured three components of attention, known as alerting, orienting, and executive control, using the Attention Network Test . To investigate MW, we measured thought probes embedded in the Sustained Attention to Response Task . Moreover, four performance characteristics of the SART were calculated as behavioral indices of MW. Three of them showed significant associations with probed MW. Most (...)
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  33.  1
    Igor Marchetti, Ernst Hw Koster & Rudi De Raedt (2012). Mindwandering Heightens the Accessibility of Negative Relative to Positive Thought. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1517-1525.
    Mindwandering is associated with both positive and negative outcomes. Among the latter, negative mood and negative cognitions have been reported. However, the underlying mechanisms linking mindwandering to negative mood and cognition are still unclear. We hypothesized that MW could either directly enhance negative thinking or indirectly heighten the accessibility of negative thoughts. In an undergraduate sample we measured emotional thoughts during the Sustained Attention on Response Task which induces MW, and accessibility of negative cognitions by means of the Scrambled (...)
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  34. Nicholas Maxwell (2014). What Philosophy Ought to Be. In Charles Tandy (ed.), Death And Anti-Death, Volume 11: Ten Years After Donald Davidson (1917-2003). Ria University Press 125-162.
    The proper task of philosophy is to keep alive awareness of what our most fundamental, important, urgent problems are, what our best attempts are at solving them and, if possible, what needs to be done to improve these attempts. Unfortunately, academic philosophy fails disastrously even to conceive of the task in these terms. It makes no attempt to ensure that universities tackle global problems - global intellectually, and global in the sense of concerning the future of the earth and humanity. (...)
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  35. Robert S. Taylor (2007). Self-Ownership and Transplantable Human Organs. Public Affairs Quarterly 21 (1):89-107.
    Philosophers have given sustained attention to the controversial possibility of (legal) markets in transplantable human organs. Most of this discussion has focused on whether such markets would enhance or diminish autonomy, understood in either the personal sense or the Kantian moral sense. What this discussion has lacked is any consideration of the relationship between self-ownership and such markets. This paper examines the implications of the most prominent and defensible conception of self-ownership--control self-ownership (CSO)--for both market and nonmarket organ-allocation mechanisms. (...)
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  36.  12
    David Marcusson-Clavertz, Devin B. Terhune & Etzel Cardeña (2012). Individual Differences and State Effects on Mind-Wandering: Hypnotizability, Dissociation, and Sensory Homogenization. Consciousness and Cognition 21 (3):1097-1108.
    Consciousness alterations can be experienced during unstructured, monotonous stimuli. These effects have not been linked to particular cognitive operations; individual differences in response to such stimulation remain poorly understood. We examined the role of hypnotizability and dissociative tendencies in mind-wandering during a sensory homogenization procedure . We expected that the influence of ganzfeld on MW would be more pronounced among highly hypnotizable individuals , particularly those high in dissociative tendencies. High and low hypnotizables, also stratified by dissociation, completed the sustained (...)
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  37.  4
    Andrew Davis (2013). To Read or Not to Read: Decoding Synthetic Phonics. Impact 2013 (20):1-38.
    In England, current government policy on children's reading is strongly prescriptive, insisting on the delivery of a pure and exclusive form of synthetic phonics, where letter sounds are learned and blended in order to ‘read’ text. A universally imposed phonics ‘check’ is taken by all five year olds and the results are widely reported. These policies are underpinned by the claim that research has shown systematic synthetic phonics to be the most effective way of teaching children to read. Andrew Davis (...)
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  38. Robert Pasnau (2013). Metaphysical Themes 1274-1671. Oxford University Press Uk.
    Robert Pasnau traces the developments of metaphysical thinking through four rich but for the most part neglected centuries of philosophy, running from the thirteenth century through to the seventeenth. At no period in the history of philosophy, other than perhaps our own, have metaphysical problems received the sort of sustained attention they received during the later Middle Ages, and never has a whole philosophical tradition come crashing down as quickly and completely as did scholastic philosophy in the seventeenth century. (...)
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  39. Graham Parkes (1994). Composing the Soul: Reaches of Nietzsche's Psychology. University of Chicago Press.
    Nietzsche wrote in _Ecce Homo_, "That a psychologist without equal speaks from my writings—this is perhaps the first insight gained by a good reader.... Who among the philosophers before me was in any way a psychologist? Before me there simply was no psychology." _Composing the Soul_ is the first study to pay sustained attention to this pronouncement and to examine the contours of Nietzsche's psychology in the context of his life and psychological makeup. Beginning with essays from Nietzsche's (...)
     
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  40. Dana Sugu & Amita Chatterjee (2010). Flashback: Reshuffling Emotions. International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 3 (1):109-133.
    Abstract: Each affective state has distinct motor-expressions, sensory perceptions, autonomic, and cognitive patterns. Panksepp (1998) proposed seven neural affective systems of which the SEEKING system, a generalized approach-seeking system, motivates organisms to pursue resources needed for survival. When an organism is presented with a novel stimulus, the dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens septi (NAS) is released. The DA circuit outlines the generalized mesolimbic dopamine-centered SEEKING system and is especially responsive when there is an element of unpredictability in forthcoming rewards. (...)
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  41.  10
    D. E. Hall (2011). The Guild of Surgeons as a Tradition of Moral Enquiry. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 36 (2):114-132.
    Alisdair MacIntyre argues that the virtues necessary for good work are everywhere and always embodied by particular communities of practice. As a general surgeon, MacIntyre’s work has deeply influenced my own understanding of the practice of good surgery. The task of this essay is to describe how the guild of surgeons functions as a more-or-less coherent tradition of moral enquiry, embodying and transmitting the virtues necessary for the practice of good surgery. Beginning with an example of surgeons engaged in a (...)
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  42.  9
    M. R. Hunt & F. A. Carnevale (2011). Moral Experience: A Framework for Bioethics Research. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (11):658-662.
    Theoretical and empirical research in bioethics frequently focuses on ethical dilemmas or problems. This paper draws on anthropological and phenomenological sources to develop an alternative framework for bioethical enquiry that allows examination of a broader range of how the moral is experienced in the everyday lives of individuals and groups. Our account of moral experience is subjective and hermeneutic. We define moral experience as “Encompassing a person's sense that values that he or she deem important are being realised or thwarted (...)
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  43.  32
    Diana H. Coole (2000). Negativity and Politics: Dionysus and Dialectics From Kant to Poststructuralism. Routledge.
    Although frequently invoked by philosophers and political theorists, the theory of negativity has received remarkably little sustained attention. Negativity and Politics is the first full-length study of this crucial topic within philosophy and political theory. Diana Coole explores the meaning of negativity in modern and postmodern thinking, and examines its significance for politics and our understanding of what constitutes the political. Beginning with an insightful reading of Kant's Critique of Pure Reason and a consideration of the work of Hegel, (...)
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  44.  8
    James Head & William S. Helton (2013). Perceptual Decoupling or Motor Decoupling? Consciousness and Cognition 22 (3):913-919.
    The current investigation was conducted to elucidate whether errors of commission in the Sustained Attention to Response Task are indicators of perceptual or motor decoupling. Twenty-eight participants completed SARTs with motor and perceptual aspects of the task manipulated. The participants completed four different SART blocks whereby stimuli location uncertainty and stimuli acquisition were manipulated. In previous studies of more traditional sustained attention tasks stimuli location uncertainty reduces sustained attention performance. In the case of the SART the motor (...)
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  45.  9
    Bruce Maxwell & Eric Racine (2010). Should Empathic Development Be a Priority in Biomedical Ethics Teaching? A Critical Perspective. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (4):433-445.
    Biomedical ethics is an essential part of the medical curriculum because it is thought to enrich moral reflection and conduce to ethical decisionmaking and ethical behavior. In recent years, however, the received idea that competency in moral reasoning leads to moral responsibility “in the field” has been the subject of sustained attention. Today, moral education and development research widely recognize moral reasoning as being but one among at least four distinguishable dimensions of psychological moral functioning alongside moral motivation, moral (...)
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  46.  5
    Mikel Burley (2014). Taking Reincarnation Seriously: Critical Discussion of Some Central Ideas From John Hick. International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 75 (3):236-253.
    Reincarnation has not been entirely neglected in the philosophy of religion but it has not always been taken seriously or carefully discussed in relation to its role in believers’ lives. John Hick is exceptional insofar as he gave sustained attention to the belief, at least as it features in the philosophies of Vedānta and Buddhism. While acknowledging the value of Hick’s recognition of the variety of reincarnation beliefs, this article critically engages with certain aspects of his approach. It argues (...)
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  47.  47
    Leland F. Saunders (2013). What is Moral Reasoning? Philosophical Psychology (1):1-20.
    What role does moral reasoning play in moral judgment? More specifically, what causal role does moral reasoning have in the production of moral judgments? Recently, many philosophers and psychologists have attempted to answer this question by drawing on empirical data. However, these attempts fall short because there has been no sustained attention to the question of what moral reasoning is. This paper addresses this problem, by providing a general account of moral reasoning in terms of a capacity, and suggests (...)
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  48.  22
    Michael E. Brown (2010). Do Ethical Leaders Get Ahead? Business Ethics Quarterly 20 (2):215-236.
    Despite sustained attention to ethical leadership in organizations, scholarship remains largely descriptive. This study employs an empirical approach to examine the consequences of ethical leadership on leader promotability. From a sample of ninety-six managers from two independent organizations, we found that ethical leaders were increasingly likely to be rated by their superior as exhibiting potential to reach senior leadership positions. However, leaders who displayed increased ethical leadership were no more likely to be viewed as promotable in the near-term compared (...)
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  49.  4
    William S. Helton, James Head & Simon Kemp (2011). Natural Disaster Induced Cognitive Disruption: Impacts on Action Slips. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1732-1737.
    Previous research has indicated an increase in stress levels and cognitive intrusions after natural disasters. These previous studies have not, however, assessed the impact disaster induced cognitive disruption has on human performance. In the present report, we investigated the impact of the 7.1 magnitude 2010 Christchurch, New Zealand earthquake on self-reported earthquake-induced cognitive disruption and its relationship to performance on the Sustained Attention to Response Task . Participants who self-reported greater cognitive disruption induced by the earthquake also had higher (...)
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  50.  9
    Barton Moffatt (2011). Responsible Authorship: Why Researchers Must Forgo Honorary Authorship. Accountability in Research 18 (2):76-90.
    Although widespread throughout the biomedical sciences, the practice of honorary authorship—the listing of authors who fail to merit inclusion as authors by authorship criteria—has received relatively little sustained attention. Is there something wrong with honorary authorship, or is it only a problem when used in conjunction with other unethical authorship practices like ghostwriting? Numerous sets of authorship guidelines discourage the practice, but its ubiquity throughout biomedicine suggests that there is a need to say more about honorary authorship. Despite its (...)
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