Search results for '*Trauma' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kiene Brillenburg Wurth (2007). The Musicality of the Past: Sehnsucht, Trauma, and the Sublime. Journal of the Philosophy of History 1 (2):219-247.score: 18.0
    This paper argues that the sublime feeling can only announce itself as a paradoxical mixture of pain and pleasure in an experience of a lost or irrevocable past. Presenting the typical evanescence and inevitable deferral of the past in musical terms, this paper rewrites the sublime feeling as a musical feeling: a suspended feeling wavering in-between apparently opposite intensities of tension and respite. This suspended feeling is analyzed through a juxtaposition of the sublime with Sehnsucht, or the potentially endless longing (...)
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  2. Victoria Bates (2012). 'Misery Loves Company': Sexual Trauma, Psychoanalysis and the Market for Misery. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 33 (2):61-81.score: 18.0
    This article examines sexual ‘misery memoirs’, focusing on author/reader and genre/market relationships in the context of models of trauma and child sexual abuse. It shows that the success of sexual ‘misery memoirs’ is inextricably bound up with the popular dissemination of a feminist-psychoanalytic model of traumatic memory that has taken place since the 1970s. It also argues that, as the ‘truth’ of recovered and traumatic memories has been fundamental to its success, anxieties about false memory and hoax ‘misery memoirs’ have (...)
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  3. Fred Ribkoff & Paul Tyndall (2011). On the Dialectics of Trauma in Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire. Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):325-337.score: 18.0
    Blanche DuBois, the tragic heroine of Tennessee Williams’ A Streetcar Named Desire , has always been read as either “mad” from the start of the play or as a character who descends into “madness.” We argue that Streetcar adumbrates elements of trauma theory, specifically symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder such as involuntary reliving of traumatic events, dissociation, guilt, shame, denial, the shattering of the self, the compulsion to repeat the story of trauma, as well as the early stages of recovery (...)
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  4. Mark Cresswell & Zulfia Karimova (2013). 'Misfortune's Image': The Cinematic Representation of Trauma in Robert Bresson's Mouchette (1967). Film-Philosophy 17 (1):154-176.score: 18.0
    This paper asks questions about 'trauma' and its cultural representation specifically, trauma's representation in the cinema. In this respect, it compares and contrasts the work of Robert Bresson, in particular his 1967 masterpiece, Mouchette , with contemporary Hollywood film. James Mangold's 1999 'Oscar-winning' Girl, Interrupted offers an interesting example for cultural comparison. In both Mouchette and Girl, Interrupted the subject matter includes, amongst other traumatic experiences, rape, childhood abuse and suicide. The paper ponders the question of whether such aspects of (...)
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  5. Gretchen Gusich (2012). A Phenomenology of Emotional Trauma: Around and About the Things Themselves. [REVIEW] Human Studies 35 (4):505-518.score: 18.0
    This paper seeks to provide a noetic analysis of emotional trauma. It highlights three essential features of trauma, as well as one non-essential feature, and attempts to make sense of them phenomenologically. The first essential feature of trauma that the paper considers is the disbelief that pervades traumatic experience. When traumatized, we cannot believe that the traumatic event has taken place. This is because we will, not for the event not to have happened—we cannot will something that is in the (...)
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  6. Tamara Fischmann, Michael O. Russ & Marianne Leuzinger-Bohleber (2013). Trauma, Dream and Psychic Change in Psychoanalyses: A Dialogue Between Psychoanalysis and the Neurosciences. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:877.score: 18.0
    How can a fruitful dialogue with neuroscientists add knowledge to the unconscious – the specific research object of psychoanalysis? Apparently a growing number of worldwide research groups have begun to realize that the neurosciences and psychoanalysis can benefit from each other in interesting ways. Sometimes empirical studies evoke challenging research questions for both research fields. In the on-going LAC-Depressionstudy, for example, one interesting and unexpected finding for both research fields is that a large majority of chronically depressed in long-term psychoanalytic (...)
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  7. S. E. Mock & S. M. Arai (2009). Childhood Trauma and Chronic Illness in Adulthood: Mental Health and Socioeconomic Status as Explanatory Factors and Buffers. Frontiers in Psychology 1:246-246.score: 18.0
    Experiences of traumatic events in childhood have been shown to have long-term consequences for health in adulthood. With data from the 2005 Canadian Community Health Survey we take a life course perspective of cumulative disadvantage and examine the potential role of mental health and socioeconomic status in adulthood as multiple mediators of the link between childhood trauma and chronic illness in adulthood. Mental health and socioeconomic status are also tested as buffers against the typically adverse consequences of childhood trauma. The (...)
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  8. Mehmet Ozan Asik & Aykan Erdemir (2010). Westernization as Cultural Trauma: Egyptian Radical Islamist Discourse on Religious Education. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 9 (25):111-132.score: 18.0
    In this article, the relation between the Westernization experience and the radical Islamists reaction in Egypt is examined. It is argued that it is necessary to focus on the historical imagination of Westernization to understand the Egyptian reaction as manifested in Islamist religious educational discourse. The historical imagination appears to be based on a traumatic experience which was triggered by a traumatic event, namely British colonialism. The religious educational discourse in Egypt, an opportune case to observe radical Islamist response to (...)
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  9. Mara Miller (forthcoming). Aesthetics as Investigation of Self, Subject, and Ethical Agency Under Trauma in Kawabata's Post-War Novel The Sound of the Mountain. Philosophy and Literature.score: 18.0
    Yasunari Kawabata’s 1952 novel The Sound of the Mountain is widely praised for its aesthetic qualities, from its adaptation of aesthetics from the Tale of Genji, through the beauty of its prose and the patterning of its images, to the references to arts and nature within the text. This article, by contrast, shows that Kawabata uses these features to demonstrate the effects of the mass trauma following the Second World War and the complicated grief it induced, on the psychology of (...)
     
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  10. Michael S. Roth (2011). Memory, Trauma, and History: Essays on Living with the Past. Columbia University Press.score: 18.0
    Remembering forgetting : Maladies de la Mémoire in nineteenth-century France -- Dying of the past : medical studies of nostalgia in nineteenth-century France -- Hysterical remembering -- Trauma, representation, and historical consciousness -- Trauma : a dystopia of the spirit -- Falling into history : Freud's case of 'Frau Emmy von N.' -- Why Freud haunts us -- Why Warburg now? -- Classic postmodernism : Keith Jenkins -- Ebb tide : Frank Ankersmit -- The art of losing oneself : Anne (...)
     
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  11. Jerome A. Miller (2009). The Trauma of Evil and the Traumatological Conception of Forgiveness. Continental Philosophy Review 42 (3):401-419.score: 15.0
    In recent years there has been widespread interest in assimilating forgiveness into a rational conception of the moral life. This project usually construes forgiveness as a way of “moving past” evil and resuming the moral narrative it disrupted. But to develop a philosophical sound conception of forgiveness, we must recognize that moral evil is world-shattering and cannot be assimilated into the moral narrative of our lives. It is not an event that happens in one’s world but to one’s world. In (...)
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  12. Birgit Linder (2011). Trauma and Truth: Representations of Madness in Chinese Literature. [REVIEW] Journal of Medical Humanities 32 (4):291-303.score: 15.0
    With only a few exceptions, the literary theme of madness has long been a domain of Western cultural studies. Much of Western writing represents madness as an inquiry into the deepest recesses of the mind, while the comparatively scarce Chinese tradition is generally defined by madness as a voice of social truth. This paper looks at five works of twentieth-century Chinese fiction that draw on socio-somatic aspects of madness to reflect upon social truths, suggesting that the inner voice of subjectivity (...)
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  13. Yochai Ataria (2013). Sense of Ownership and Sense of Agency During Trauma. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-14.score: 15.0
    This paper seeks to describe and analyze the traumatic experience through an examination of the sense of agency—the sense of controlling one’s body, and sense of ownership—the sense that it is my body that undergoes experiences. It appears that there exist (at least) two levels of traumatic experience: on the first level one loses the sense of agency but retains the sense of ownership, whilst on the second one loses both of these, with symptoms becoming progressively more severe. A comparison (...)
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  14. Ines Blix & Tim Brennen (2011). Intentional Forgetting of Emotional Words After Trauma: A Study with Victims of Sexual Assault. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 15.0
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  15. Jody M. Davies (2001). Back to the Future in Psychoanalysis: Trauma, Dissociation, and the Nature of Unconscious Processes. In Muriel Dimen & Adrienne Harris (eds.), Storms in Her Head: Freud and the Construction of Hysteria. Other Press. 245-264.score: 15.0
     
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  16. Sara E. Lewis (2013). Trauma and the Making of Flexible Minds in the Tibetan Exile Community. Ethos 41 (3):313-336.score: 15.0
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  17. Ezzat Moghazy & Quinette Louw (2012). Validation of a New Outcome Measure for Orthopaedic Trauma Inpatients. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (3):567-571.score: 15.0
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  18. Russell Meares (2000/2001). Intimacy and Alienation: Memory, Trauma and Personal Being. Brunner-Routledge.score: 12.0
    Intimacy and Alienation puts forward the author's unique paradigm for psychotherapy and counselling based on the assumption that each patient has suffered a disruption of the `self', and that the goal of the therapist is to identify and work with that disruption. Using many clinical illustrations, and drawing on self psychology, attachment therapy and theories of trauma, Russell Meares looks at the nature of self and how it develops, before going on to explore the form and feeling of experience when (...)
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  19. Andrea Nicki (2001). The Abused Mind: Feminist Theory, Psychiatric Disability, and Trauma. Hypatia 16 (4):80-104.score: 12.0
    I show how much psychiatric disability is informed by trauma, marginalization, sexist norms, social inequalities, concepts of irrationality and normalcy, oppositional mind-body dualism, and mainstream moral values. Drawing on feminist discussion of physical disability, I present a feminist theory of psychiatric disability that serves to liberate not only those who are psychiatrically disabled but also the mind and moral consciousness restricted in their ranges of rational possibilities.
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  20. Karyn L. Freedman (2006). The Epistemological Significance of Psychic Trauma. Hypatia 21 (2):104-125.score: 12.0
    This essay explores the epistemological significance of the kinds of beliefs that grow out of traumatic experiences, such as the rape survivor's belief that she is never safe. On current theories of justification, beliefs like this one are generally dismissed due to either insufficient evidence or insufficient propositional content. Here, Freedman distinguishes two discrete sides of the aftermath of psychic trauma, the shattered self and the shattered worldview. This move enables us to see these beliefs as beliefs; in other words, (...)
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  21. Constance L. Mui (2005). A Feminist-Sartrean Approach to Understanding Rape Trauma. Sartre Studies International 11 (s 1-2):153-165.score: 12.0
    To many Sartreans, these accounts of the common physical and psychological responses to trauma reflect a familiar view of the self. For Sartre, the self is not an unchanging, underlying essence that guarantees personal identity over time; rather, it is an ongoing project that is founded on our being-in-the-world as embodied freedom, on our concrete relations with others, and, I would add, on our emotions. It thus appears that feminist writings on the effects of sexual trauma could benefit greatly from (...)
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  22. Mara Miller (2013). Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part II: Suggestions for Teaching About the Atomic Bombings, with Particular Attention to Middle School. The Clearing House 86 (05):164-173.score: 12.0
    In a companion article, “Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part I: Japanese Nuclear Trauma And Resistance To The Atomic Bomb” (this issue), I argue that we need to teach about the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, even though the material is difficult emotionally as well as intellectually. Because of the nature of the information, this topic can be as difficult for graduate students (and their professors!) as for younger students. Teaching about the atomic bombings, however, demands special treatment if (...)
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  23. Susana Onega Jaén & Jean-Michel Ganteau (eds.) (2011). Ethics and Trauma in Contemporary British Fiction. Rodopi.score: 12.0
    INTRODUCTION JEAN-MICHEL GANTEAU AND SUSANA ONEGA The rise of trauma theory in the critical field is a recent phenomenon associated with the revival of ...
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  24. R. Joseph (2003). Emotional Trauma and Childhood Amnesia. Consciousness and Emotion 4 (2):151-179.score: 12.0
    It has been reported that, on average, most adults recall first memories formed around age 3.5. In general, most first memories are positive. However, whether these first memories tend to be visual or verbal and whether the period for childhood amnesia (CA) is greater for visual or verbal or for positive versus negative memories has not been determined. Because negative, stressful experiences disrupt memory and can injure memory centers such as the hippocampus and amygdala, and since adults who were traumatized (...)
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  25. Jennifer J. Freyd (1994). Betrayal Trauma: Traumatic Amnesia as an Adaptive Response to Childhood Abuse. Ethics and Behavior 4 (4):307 – 329.score: 12.0
    Betrayal trauma theory suggests that psychogenic amnesia is an adaptive response to childhood abuse. When a parent or other powerful figure violates a fundamental ethic of human relationships, victims may need to remain unaware of the trauma not to reduce suffering but rather to promote survival. Amnesia enables the child to maintain an attachment with a figure vital to survival, development, and thriving. Analysis of evolutionary pressures, mental modules, social cognitions, and developmental needs suggests that the degree to which the (...)
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  26. Gregg Horowitz (2011). The Homeopathic Image, or, Trauma, Intimacy and Poetry. Critical Horizons 11 (3):463 - 490.score: 12.0
    The concept of trauma has recently expanded its reach to include what otherwise might be understood as intimate experience. This overextension represents a threat to our ability to conceptualize intimate experiences, hence to use concepts to engage in intimate communication. An analysis of Wallace Stevens’s poem “The Auroras of Autumn”, demonstrates how poetry provides a supplemental vehicle for the communication of intimate experiences. Poetry is therefore characterized as an essential element in ethical life.
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  27. M. la Caze (2011). Terrorism and Trauma: Negotiating Derridean 'Autoimmunity'. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (5):605-619.score: 12.0
    I begin by examining the logic of autoimmunity as characterized by Jacques Derrida, ‘that strange behaviour where a living being, in quasi-suicidal fashion, ‘‘itself’’ works to destroy its own protection, to immunize itself against its own immunity’ (Borradori, 2003: 94). According to Derrida, religion, democracy, terrorism and recent responses to the trauma of terrorism can be understood in terms of this logic. Responses to terrorism are ‘autoimmune’ and increase the trauma of terrorism as well as risking democratic values. I argue (...)
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  28. Heinz Schott (2008). Psychological Trauma From the Perspective of Medical History: From Paracelsus to Freud. Poiesis and Praxis 6 (3-4):191-202.score: 12.0
    Psychological traumatisation, as we understand it today, was—in terms of the history of ideas—anticipated by various approaches which have had a lasting impact on modern psychiatry, psychotherapy, and psychosomatic medicine. On the one hand, there is the traditional concept of possession and exorcism with its impressive psychodynamics. On the other hand, there is the theory of the imagination, of an illusion in the sense of a pathogenic infection. Especially the pathological teachings of Paracelsus (sixteenth century) and Johann Baptist van Helmont (...)
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  29. Elyse Amend, Linda Kay & Rosemary C. Reilly (2012). Journalism on the Spot: Ethical Dilemmas When Covering Trauma and the Implications for Journalism Education. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 27 (4):235-247.score: 12.0
    When covering traumatic events, novice journalists frequently face situations they are rarely prepared to resolve. This paper highlights ethical dilemmas faced by journalists who participated in a focus group exploring the news media's trauma coverage. Major themes included professional obligations versus ethical responsibilities, journalists' perceived status and roles, permissible harms, and inexperience. Instructional classroom simulations based on experiential learning theory can bridge the gap between the theory of ethical trauma reporting and realities journalists face when covering events that are often (...)
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  30. Sarah L. Bunnell & John-Paul Legerski (2011). The Risks, Benefits, and Ethics of Trauma-Focused Research Participation. Ethics and Behavior 20 (6):429-442.score: 12.0
    With the rising interest in the field of trauma research, many Institutional Review Boards, policymakers, parents, and others grapple with the impact of trauma-research participation on research participants' well-being. Do individuals who participate in trauma-focused research risk experiencing lasting negative effects from participation? What are the potential benefits that may be gleaned from participation in this work? How can trauma research studies be designed ethically, minimizing the risk to participants? The following review seeks to answer these questions. This review indicates (...)
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  31. Rebecca Collins (2005). Posthumous Reproduction and the Presumption Against Consent in Cases of Death Caused by Sudden Trauma. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 30 (4):431 – 442.score: 12.0
    The deceased's prior consent to posthumous reproduction is a common requirement in many common law jurisdictions. This paper critically evaluates four arguments advanced to justify the presumption against consent. It is argued that, in situations where death is caused by sudden trauma, not only is there inadequate justification for the presumption against consent, but there are good reasons to reverse the presumption. The article concludes that the precondition of prior consent may be inappropriate in these situations.
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  32. Lisa DeMarni Cromer, Jennifer J. Freyd, Angela K. Binder, Anne P. DePrince & Kathryn Becker-Blease (2006). What's the Risk in Asking? Participant Reaction to Trauma History Questions Compared with Reaction to Other Personal Questions. Ethics and Behavior 16 (4):347 – 362.score: 12.0
    Does asking about trauma history create participant distress? If so, how does it compare with reactions to other personal questions? Do participants consider trauma questions important compared to other personal questions? Using 2 undergraduate samples (Ns = 240 and 277), the authors compared participants' reactions to trauma questions with their reactions to other possibly invasive questions through a self-report survey. Trauma questions caused relatively minimal distress and were perceived as having greater importance and greater cost-benefit ratings compared to other kinds (...)
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  33. Magdalena Zolkos (2009). Reconciliation—No Pasarán: Trauma, Testimony and Language for Paul Celan. The European Legacy 14 (3):269-282.score: 12.0
    This article intervenes in the project of theorizing the politics of reconciliation and transitional justice with the suggestion that (a) more attention be paid to subjective experiences and discursive sensitivities affected/shaped by the trauma of historical violence and injustice, and that (b) the constitutive as well as potentially subversive working of these experiences and sensitivities be recognized. It focuses specifically on Paul Celan (1920?1970), a Jewish-Romanian-German poet and Holocaust survivor, proposing a reading of his work that connects aspects of the (...)
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  34. Mark Silcox (forthcoming). Psychological Trauma and the Simulated Self. Philosophy of the Social Sciences:0048393113485989.score: 12.0
    In the 1980s, there was a significant upsurge in diagnoses of Dissociative Identity Disorder. Ian Hacking suggests that the roots of this tendency lie in the excessive willingness of psychologists past and present to engage in the “psychologization of trauma.” I argue that Hacking makes some philosophically problematic assumptions about the putative threat to human autonomy that is posed by the increasing availability, attractiveness, and plausibility of various forms of simulated experience. I also suggest how a different set of axiological (...)
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  35. Michael Hampe (2007). Achilles' Brain: Philosophical Notes on Trauma. History of the Human Sciences 20 (3):85-103.score: 12.0
    The article investigates the relevance of the concepts of truth and truthfulness in culturalistic, psychoanalytical and neuro-biological theories of trauma from a philosophical point of view. The background for this is the recent claim of some brain scientists to produce an overall view of the human situation. This claim is shown to be false. The article comes to the conclusion that the subjective perception of a traumatic event is indispensable in order to understand the phenomena of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). (...)
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  36. Wulf Kansteiner (2004). Testing the Limits of Trauma: The Long-Term Psychological Effects of the Holocaust on Individuals and Collectives. History of the Human Sciences 17 (2-3):97-123.score: 12.0
    In light of the great interest in interdisciplinary trauma research, this article explores the philosophical-literary concept of cultural trauma from the perspective of psychiatric and psychoanalytical studies of the long-term consequences of the Holocaust. The extensive literature on the psychological after-effects of the Final Solution offers an exceptional opportunity to study the aftermath of extreme violence from different subject positions, including the perspectives of survivors, perpetrators, bystanders, and their descendants. Moving from the epicenter of the historical event of the Holocaust (...)
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  37. David D. Phillips (2007). Trauma Ek Pronoias in Athenian Law. Journal of Hellenic Studies 127:74-.score: 12.0
    This article presents a comprehensive study of the offence of trauma ek pronoias (intentional wounding) in Athenian law. Part I catalogues every occurrence of the words traËma and titr¿skv in the Attic orators and concludes that the requisite physical element of trauma ek pronoias was the use of a weapon. Part II analyses all attested trauma lawsuits and concludes that the requisite mental element of the offence was a bare intent to wound. Part III addresses the procedural evidence for trauma (...)
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  38. Hiro Saito (2006). Reiterated Commemoration: Hiroshima as National Trauma. Sociological Theory 24 (4):353 - 376.score: 12.0
    This article examines historical transformations of Japanese collective memory of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima by utilizing a theoretical framework that combines a model of reiterated problem solving and a theory of cultural trauma. I illustrate how the event of the nuclear fallout in March 1954 allowed actors to consolidate previously fragmented commemorative practices into a master frame to define the postwar Japanese identity in terms of transnational commemoration of "Hiroshima." I also show that nationalization of trauma of "Hiroshima" involved (...)
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  39. M. G. Fromm (2004). Psychoanalysis and Trauma: September 11 Revisited. Diogenes 51 (3):3-14.score: 12.0
    On November 9, 2002, a few hundred people, mostly mental health clinicians, gathered at the New York University Medical Center for two days of discussions on the theme, September 11th: Psychoanalytic Reflections in the Second Year. The conference was sponsored by the five New York Societies of the International Psychoanalytical Association. The presentations described various bits of learning that seemed to be emerging from the crisis clinical work with so many traumatized people since the attack on the World Trade Center. (...)
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  40. Mara Miller (2013). Terrible Knowledge And Tertiary Trauma, Part I: Teaching About Japanese Nuclear Trauma And Resistance To The Atomic Bomb. The Clearing HouseHouse 86 (05):157-163.score: 12.0
    This article discusses twelve reasons that we must teach about the 1945 American atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. As with Holocaust studies, we must teach this material even though it is both emotionally and intellectually difficult—in spite of our feelings of repugnance and/or grief, and our concerns regarding students’ potential distress (“tertiary trauma”). To handle such material effectively, we should keep in mind ten objectives: 1) to expand students' knowledge about the subject along with the victims’ experience of it; (...)
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  41. Nikolai Axmacher, Anne T. A. Do Lam, Henrik Kessler & Juergen Fell (2010). Natural Memory Beyond the Storage Model: Repression, Trauma, and the Construction of a Personal Past. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 12.0
    Naturally occurring memory processes show features which are difficult to investigate by conventional cognitive neuroscience paradigms. Distortions of memory for problematic contents are described both by psychoanalysis (internal conflicts) and research on post-traumatic stress disorder (external traumata). Typically, declarative memory for these contents is impaired – possibly due to repression in the case of internal conflicts or due to dissociation in the case of external traumata – but they continue to exert an unconscious pathological influence: neurotic symptoms or psychosomatic disorders (...)
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  42. Rebecca Comay (2008). Missed Revolutions: Translation, Transmission, Trauma. Idealistic Studies 38 (1/2):23-40.score: 12.0
    This essay explores the familiar German ideology according to which a revolution in thought would, in varying proportions, precede, succeed, accommodate,and generally upstage a political revolution whose defining feature was increasingly thought to be its founding violence: the slide from 1789 to 1793. Germany thus sets out to quarantine the political threat of revolution while siphoning off and absorbing the revolution’s intensity and energy for thinking as such. The essay holds that this structure corresponds to the psychoanalytic logic of trauma: (...)
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  43. David Farrell Krell (2012). Narrative as Trauma and Resilience. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 17 (1):75-88.score: 12.0
    After listing a series of topics in Scott’s Living with Indifference that I would have wanted to address but, if only for reasons of space, could not, I focus on the uses of narrative or fiction in Scott’s book. I am particularly interested in the relation of fiction to trauma. It is the resilience of fiction that perhaps enables it to speak—or to write—so eloquently about traumatic occurrences. As a writer of fiction, I am gripped by the proximity and even (...)
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  44. J. McKinstry (2013). Perpetual Bodily Trauma: Wounding and Memory in the Middle English Romances. Medical Humanities 39 (1):59-64.score: 12.0
    In the 21st century, the concept of trauma is deeply ingrained in psychological discourse despite the term's origins in literal, physical wounding and affecting experience. However, to understand the sources or causes of trauma, psychologists recognise the paramount importance of somatic evidence. The body provides corporeal systems for inputs that might trigger a later remembrance which might be auditory, visual, even tactile. The same body will continue to experience the trauma throughout its life, only alleviated, perhaps, by an appropriate therapeutic (...)
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  45. Magdalena Zolkos (2011). Apocalyptic Writing, Trauma and Community in IMRE Kertész's Fateless. Angelaki 15 (3):87-98.score: 12.0
    (2010). Apocalyptic Writing, Trauma and Community in IMRE Kertész's Fateless. Angelaki: Vol. 15, The Unbearable Charm of Fragility Philosophizing in/on Eastern Europe, pp. 87-98.
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  46. B. Bergo (2009). Trauma and Hysteria: A Tale of Passions and Reversal. In Kristen Brown & Bettina Bergo (eds.), The Trauma Controversy: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Dialogues. Suny Press. 205--231.score: 12.0
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  47. A. Bhangu, E. Hood, A. Datta & S. Mangaleshkar (2008). Is Informed Consent Effective in Trauma Patients? Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (11):780-782.score: 12.0
    Background: Informed consent in the modern era is a common and important topic both for the well-informed patient and to prevent unnecessary litigation. However, the effectiveness of informed consent in trauma patients is an under-researched area. This paper aims to assess the differences in patient recall of the consent process and desire for information by performing a comparative analysis between orthopaedic trauma and elective patients. Methods: Information from 41 consecutive elective operations and 40 consecutive trauma operations was collected on the (...)
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  48. Kristen Brown Golden & Bettina G. Bergo (eds.) (2009). The Trauma Controversy: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Dialogues. State University of New York Press.score: 12.0
    Provides multiple and accessible perspectives on trauma both as a condition and as a cultural phenomenon.
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  49. Joan Hawkins (1998). All the World's a Stage: On Timothy Murray, Drama Trauma: Specters of Race and Sexuality in Performance, Video and Art. Film-Philosophy 2 (1).score: 12.0
    Drama Trauma is a difficult book to review because it both does and does not hang together as one sustained linear argument. Made up of pieces originally written for another book-length project and of more recent critical readings of cultural performance, the book moves from a lengthy section on Shakespeare to much briefer sections on contemporary drama, performance art and installation pieces. And since there's no conclusion, it's not always clear how the sections interact with one another; how they hang (...)
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  50. Gregg M. Horowitz (2009). A Late Adventure of the Feelings: Loss, Trauma, and the Limits of Psychoanalysis. In Kristen Brown & Bettina Bergo (eds.), The Trauma Controversy: Philosophical and Interdisciplinary Dialogues. Suny Press. 23--44.score: 12.0
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