Search results for '*Verbal Communication' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Miriam De Boer, Ivan Toni & Roel M. Willems (2013). What Drives Successful Verbal Communication? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    There is a vast amount of potential mappings between behaviours and intentions in communication: a behaviour can indicate a multitude of different intentions, and the same intention can be communicated with a variety of behaviours. Humans routinely solve these many-to-many referential problems when producing utterances for an Addressee. This ability might rely on social cognitive skills, for instance, the ability to manipulate unobservable summary variables to disambiguate ambiguous behaviour of other agents (“mentalizing”) and the drive to invest resources into (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Anna Papafragou (2002). Mindreading and Verbal Communication. Mind and Language 17 (1&2):55–67.score: 60.0
    The idea that verbal communication involves a species of mindreading is not new. Among linguists and philosophers, largely as a result of Grice’s (1957, 1967) influence, it has long been recognized that the act of communicating involves on the part of the communicator and the addressee mutual metarepresentations of each others’ mental states. In psychology, the coordination of common ground and attention in conversation has been pursued in a variety of studies (e.g. Clark and Marshall, 1981; Bruner, 1983).
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Bart Vandenabeele (2002). No Need for Essences. On Non-Verbal Communication in First Inter-Cultural Contacts. South African Journal of Philosophy 21 (2):85-96.score: 60.0
    Drawing on anthropological examples of first contacts between people from different cultures, I argue that non-verbal communication plays a far bigger part in intercultural communication than has been acknowledged in the literature so far. Communication rests on mutually attuning in a large number of judgements. Some sort of structuring principle is needed at this point, and Davidson's principle of charity is a good candidate, provided sufficient attention is given to non-verbal communication. There will always be more (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Marcel Danesi (2003). Metaphorical “Networks” and Verbal Communication. Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):341-363.score: 48.0
    This paper presents the notion that verbal discourse is structured, in form and contents, by metaphorical reasoning. It discusses the concept of “metaphorical network” as a framework for relating the parts of a speech act to each other, since such an act seems to cohere into a meaningful text on the basis of “domains” that deliver common concepts. The basic finding of several research projects on this concept suggest that source domains allow speakers to derive sense from a verbal interaction (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Gerald Echterhoff (2013). The Role of Action in Verbal Communication and Shared Reality. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (4):354 - 355.score: 48.0
    In examining the utility of the action view advanced in the Pickering & Garrod (P&G) target article, I first consider its contribution to the analysis of language vis-à-vis earlier language-as-action approaches. Second, I assess the relation between coordinated joint action, which serves as a blueprint for dialogue coordination, and the experience of shared reality, a key concomitant and product of interpersonal communication.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Raymond W. Gibbs (1988). How Do You Know When You Have Understood? Psycholinguistic Criteria for Understanding Verbal Communication. Communication and Cognition 21 (2):201-225.score: 48.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. L. Ledru & F. Lowenthal (1988). The Use of a Non-Verbal Communication Device in a Diagnostic Perspective or in Clinical Research. Communication and Cognition 21 (1):17-27.score: 48.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Anne Bezuidenhout (1998). Is Verbal Communication a Purely Preservative Process? Philosophical Review 107 (2):261-288.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Christina A. Clark (2010). Non-Verbal Communication (M. L.) Catoni Schemata. Comunicazione non verbale nella Grecia antica. (Studi 2.) Pp. x + 375, ills. Pisa: Edizioni della Normale, 2005. Paper, €40. ISBN: 978-88-7642-157-. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 60 (01):178-.score: 45.0
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Marta Dynel (2011). Turning Speaker Meaning on its Head: Non-Verbal Communication an Intended Meanings. Pragmatics and Cognition 19 (3):422-447.score: 45.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Chaterjee Sinha Atashee (2008). Verbal Communication and Gender Discrimination: A Study From an Indian Perspective. International Journal on Humanistic Ideology 1:85-110.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Wimal Dissanayake (1982). The Phenomenology of Verbal Communication: A Classical Indian View. Semiotica 41 (1-4).score: 45.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. J. J. Sparkes (1976). The Simulation of Verbal Communication Activities. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 10:162-173.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. E. Robinson (1977). Development in the Understanding of Causes of Success and Failure in Verbal Communication. Cognition 5 (4):363-378.score: 45.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Michael Argyle (1976). Non-Verbal Communication and Language. Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 10:63-78.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Rom Harré (1973). Non-Verbal Communication. Edited by R. A. Hinde. Pp. 443. (Cambridge University Press, 1972.) Price £5·00. [REVIEW] Journal of Biosocial Science 5 (1):145-148.score: 45.0
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Frank Hammonds (2006). Toward an "Awareness" of the Relationship Between Task Performance and Own Verbal Accounts of That Performance. Analysis of Verbal Behavior 22:101-110.score: 42.0
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dirk Wildgruber Benjamin Kreifelts, Heike Jacob, Carolin Brück, Michael Erb, Thomas Ethofer (2013). Non-Verbal Emotion Communication Training Induces Specific Changes in Brain Function and Structure. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 39.0
    The perception of emotional cues from voice and face is essential for social interaction. However, this process is altered in various psychiatric conditions along with impaired social functioning. Emotion communication trainings have been demonstrated to improve social interaction in healthy individuals and to reduce emotional communication deficits in psychiatric patients. Here, we investigated the impact of a nonverbal emotion communication training (NECT) on cerebral activation and brain structure in a controlled and combined functional magnetic resonance imaging and (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Loris Tamara Schiaratura (2013). Analyse et interprétation psychologiques des comportements corporels en situation de communication interpersonnelle. Methodos 13 (13).score: 36.0
    Dans une communication interpersonnelle, l’échange se fait avec des mots mais aussi avec le corps. Les comportements corporels sont souvent considérés comme un langage dont le code est directement interprétable. Dans la plupart des cas, les comportements corporels sont codés de manière continue, probable et iconique. Il faut alors prendre en compte le processus d’inférence à la base d’une représentation de l’état de la personne qui interagit. L’article présente les outils théoriques et méthodologiques de la psychologie qui permettent d’analyser (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Niamh M. Brennan, Doris M. Merkl-Davies & Annika Beelitz (2013). Dialogism in Corporate Social Responsibility Communications: Conceptualising Verbal Interaction Between Organisations and Their Audiences. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 115 (4):665-679.score: 36.0
    We conceptualise CSR communication as a process of reciprocal influence between organisations and their audiences. We use an illustrative case study in the form of a conflict between firms and a powerful stakeholder which is played out in a series of 20 press releases over a 2-month period to develop a framework of analysis based on insights from linguistics. It focuses on three aspects of dialogism, namely (i) turn-taking (co-operating in a conversation by responding to the other party), (ii) (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Luc van Poecke (1988). Denotation/Connotation and Verbal/Nonverbal Communication. Semiotica 71 (1-2):125-152.score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Irene Portis-Winner (1999). A (Culture) Text is a Mechanism Constituting a System of Heterogeneous Semiotic Spaces, in Whose Continuum the Message...(Is) Circulated. We Do Not Perceive This Message to Be the Manifestation of a Single Language: A Minimum of Two Languages is Required to Create It (Lotman 1994: 377).[(1981]). The Assumption is That All Communication is Through Signs, Verbal, Visual, Movements, Performances, Rituals, Etc. Peirce's Classic Definition of the Sign is the Following:“A Sign is Something Which Stands to ... [REVIEW] Sign Systems Studies 27:24-45.score: 36.0
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Patricia Tway (1976). Verbal and Nonverbal Communication of Factory Workers. Semiotica 16 (1).score: 36.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. David Lubinski & Travis Thompson (1993). Species and Individual Differences in Communication Based on Private States. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (4):627.score: 33.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Joanne Tarasuik, Roslyn Galligan & Jordy Kaufman (2013). Seeing is Believing but is Hearing? Comparing Audio and Video Communication for Young Children. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 33.0
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Josef Perner & Zoltán Dienes (2003). Developmental Aspects of Consciousness: How Much Theory of Mind Do You Need to Be Consciously Aware? Consciousness and Cognition 12 (1):63-82.score: 30.0
  27. D. L. Spivak (2004). Linguistics of Altered States of Consciousness: Problems and Prospects. Journal of Quantitative Linguistics 11 (1):27-32.score: 30.0
  28. A. N. Leontiev (2005). Lecture 13. Language and Consciousness. Journal of Russian and East European Psychology 43 (5):5-13.score: 30.0
  29. Reidun Førde (1998). Competing Conceptions of Diagnostic Reasoning – is There a Way Out? Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (1):59-72.score: 30.0
    Diagnostic errors are more frequently a result of the clinician's failure to combine medical knowledge adequately than of data inaccuracy. Diagnostic reasoning studies are valuable to understand and improve diagnostic reasoning. However, most diagnostic reasoning studies are characterized by some limitations which make these studies seem more simple than diagnostic reasoning in real life situations actually is. These limitations are connected both to the failure to acknowledge components of knowledge used in clinical practice as well as to acknowledge the physician-patient (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Mark Blokpoel, Marlieke van Kesteren, Arjen Stolk, Pim Haselager, Ivan Toni & Iris Van Rooij (2012). Recipient Design in Human Communication: Simple Heuristics or Perspective Taking? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 28.0
    Humans have a remarkable capacity for tuning their communicative behaviors to different addressees, a phenomenon also known as recipient design. It remains unclear how this tuning of communicative behavior is implemented during live human interactions. Classical theories of communication postulate that recipient design involves perspective taking, i.e., the communicator selects her behavior based on her hypotheses about beliefs and knowledge of the recipient. More recently, researchers have argued that perspective taking is computationally too costly to be a plausible mechanism (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Richard Moore (2013). Imitation and Conventional Communication. Biology and Philosophy 28 (3):481-500.score: 27.0
    To the extent that language is conventional, non-verbal individuals, including human infants, must participate in conventions in order to learn to use even simple utterances of words. This raises the question of which varieties of learning could make this possible. In this paper I defend Tomasello’s (The cultural origins of human cognition. Harvard UP, Cambridge, 1999, Origins of human communication. MIT, Cambridge, 2008) claim that knowledge of linguistic conventions could be learned through imitation. This is possible because Lewisian accounts (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Elizabeth de Freitas (2013). What Were You Thinking? A Deleuzian/Guattarian Analysis of Communication in the Mathematics Classroom. Educational Philosophy and Theory 45 (3):287-300.score: 27.0
    The primary aim of this article is to bring the work of Deleuze and Guattari to bear on the question ofcommunication in the classroom. I focus on the mathematics classroom, where agency and subjectivity are highly regulated by the rituals of the discipline, and where neoliberal psychological frameworks continue to dominate theories of teaching and learning. Moreover, the nature ofcommunication in mathematics classrooms remains highlyelusive and problematic, due in part to the distinct relationship the discipline has with verbal language and (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Grace Megumi Chen, Keith Jonathon Yoder, Barbara Lynn Ganzel, Matthew S. Goodwin & Matthew Kenneth Belmonte (2012). Harnessing Repetitive Behaviours to Engage Attention and Learning in a Novel Therapy for Autism: An Exploratory Analysis. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 27.0
    Rigorous, quantitative examination of therapeutic techniques anecdotally reported to have been successful in people with autism who lack communicative speech will help guide basic science towards a more complete characterisation of the cognitive profile in this underserved subpopulation, and show the extent to which theories and results developed with the high-functioning subpopulation may apply. This study examines a novel therapy, the “Rapid Prompting Method” (RPM). RPM is a parent-developed communicative and educational therapy for persons with autism who do not speak (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Uri Hasson, Asif A. Ghazanfar, Bruno Galantucci, Simon Garrod & Christian Keysers (2012). Brain-to-Brain Coupling: A Mechanism for Creating and Sharing a Social World. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (2):114-121.score: 24.0
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Josiane Cristina Coradi Prado Telles, Maíra Bonafé Sei & Sérgio Luiz Saboya Arruda (2010). Comunicação silenciosa mãe-bebê na visão winnicottiana: reflexões teórico-clínicas. Aletheia 33:109-122.score: 24.0
    Objetivou-se discutir a comunicação silenciosa entre mãe e bebê, a partir do pensamento de Winnicott. Fez-se uma pesquisa qualitativa, baseada no método clínico e referencial psicanalítico, por meio do estudo de caso de uma criança, com 8 anos de idade e dificuldades no desenvolvimento da fala, sem ..
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Irenäus Eibl-Eibesfeldt (1979). Human Ethology: Concepts and Implications for the Sciences of Man. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):1-26.score: 24.0
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Helena Telkänranta (2009). Conditioning or Cognition? Understanding Interspecific Communication as a Way of Improving Animal Training (a Case Study with Elephants in Nepal). Sign Systems Studies 37 (3-4):542-555.score: 24.0
    When animals are trained to function in a human society (for example, pet dogs, police dogs, or sports horses), different trainers and training cultures vary widely in their ability to understand how the animal perceives the communication efforts of the trainer. This variation has considerable impact on the resulting performance and welfare of the animals. There are many trainers who frequently resort to physical punishment or other pain-inflicting methods when the attempts to communicate have failed or when the trainer (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. A. K. Kuhlen, C. Allefeld & J. D. Haynes (2011). Content-Specific Coordination of Listeners' to Speakers' EEG During Communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:266-266.score: 22.0
    Cognitive neuroscience has recently begun to extend its focus from the isolated individual mind to two or more individuals coordinating with each other. In this study we uncover a coordination of neural activity between the ongoing electroencephalogram (EEG) of two people – a person speaking and a person listening. The EEG of one set of twelve participants (“speakers”) was recorded while they were narrating short stories. The EEG of another set of twelve participants (“listeners”) was recorded while watching audiovisual recordings (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Inge Volman, Matthijs L. Noordzij & Ivan Toni (2012). Sources of Variability in Human Communicative Skills. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 22.0
    When established communication systems cannot be used, people rapidly create novel systems to modify the mental state of another agent according to their intentions. However, there are dramatic inter-individual differences in the implementation of this human competence for communicative innovation. Here we characterize psychological sources of inter-individual variability in the ability to build a shared communication system from scratch. We consider two potential sources of variability in communicative skills. Cognitive traits of two individuals could independently influence their joint (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Anna Papafragou, Early Communication: Beyond Speech-Act Theory.score: 21.0
    For the past two decades, speech-act theory has been one of the basic tools for studying pragmatics from both a theoretical and an experimental perspective. In this paper, I want to discuss certain aspects of the theory with respect to data from early communication in children. My aim will be to show that some of the central assumptions of the speech-act model of utterance comprehension need to be rethought. In the second part of the paper, I will outline a (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Adrian Costache (2011). Toward a New Middle Ages? On Aurel Codoban’s The Empire of Communication. [REVIEW] Journal for Communication and Culture 1 (2):162-166.score: 21.0
    Codoban, Aurel. Imperiul comunicării: corp, imagine şi relaţionare (The Empire of Communication: Body, Image and Relation). Cluj-Napoca: Idea, 2011.
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Riin Magnus (forthcoming). The Function, Formation and Development of Signs in the Guide Dog Team's Work. Biosemiotics:1-17.score: 21.0
    Relying on interviews and fieldwork observations, the article investigates the choice of signs made by guide dogs and their visually impaired handlers while the team is on the move. It also explores the dependence of the choice of signs on specific functions of communication and examines the changes and development of sign usage throughout the team’s work. A significant part of the team’s communication appears to be related to retaining the communicative situation itself: to the establishment of intrateam (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Arnaud Delorme, Julie Beischel, Leena Michel, Mark Boccuzzi, Dean Radin & Paul Mills (2013). Electrocortical Activity Associated with Subjective Communication with the Deceased. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 21.0
    During advanced meditative practices, unusual perceptions can arise including the sense of receiving information about unknown people who are deceased (“discarnates”). The reported experience of initiating mental communication with the deceased, may involve a state of consciousness similar to that achieved in contemplative meditation practices. As with meditation, this mental state involves calming mental chatter and becoming receptive to subtle feelings and sensations. Psychometric and brain electrophysiology data were collected from six individuals who had previously reported accurate information about (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Ivan Toni Matthijs L. Noordzij, Sarah E. Newman-Norlund, Jan Peter de Ruiter, Peter Hagoort, Stephen C. Levinson (2009). Brain Mechanisms Underlying Human Communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 21.0
    Human communication has been described as involving the coding-decoding of a conventional symbol system, which could be supported by parts of the human motor system (i.e. the “mirror neurons system”). However, this view does not explain how these conventions could develop in the first place. Here we target the neglected but crucial issue of how people organize their non-verbal behavior to communicate a given intention without pre-established conventions. We have measured behavioral and brain responses in pairs of subjects during (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Ipke Wachsmuth, Manuela Lenzen & Günther Knoblich (eds.) (2008). Embodied Communication in Humans and Machines. OUP Oxford.score: 21.0
    When people communicate face to face they don't just exchange verbal information. Rather, communication encompasses the whole body. Communication partners synchronize their body sway, and mimic or imitate each other's body postures and actions. They produce a multitude of manual and facial gestures that help to illustrate what is being said, show how communication partners feel, or or reveal verbal deception. Moreover, face-to-face communication takes place in shared contexts where partners jointly attend and refer to the (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. David J. Chalmers (2011). Verbal Disputes. Philosophical Review 120 (4):515-566.score: 18.0
    The philosophical interest of verbal disputes is twofold. First, they play a key role in philosophical method. Many philosophical disagreements are at least partly verbal, and almost every philosophical dispute has been diagnosed as verbal at some point. Here we can see the diagnosis of verbal disputes as a tool for philosophical progress. Second, they are interesting as a subject matter for first-order philosophy. Reflection on the existence and nature of verbal disputes can reveal something about the nature of concepts, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Antony Aumann (2008). Kierkegaard on the Need for Indirect Communication. Dissertation, Indiana Universityscore: 18.0
    This dissertation concerns Kierkegaard’s theory of indirect communication. A central aspect of this theory is what I call the “indispensability thesis”: there are some projects only indirect communication can accomplish. The purpose of the dissertation is to disclose and assess the rationale behind the indispensability thesis. -/- A pair of questions guides the project. First, to what does ‘indirect communication’ refer? Two acceptable responses exist: (1) Kierkegaard’s version of Socrates’ midwifery method and (2) Kierkegaard’s use of artful (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Clas Weber (2013). Centered Communication. Philosophical Studies 166 (1):205-223.score: 18.0
    According to an attractive account of belief, our beliefs have centered content. According to an attractive account of communication, we utter sentences to express our beliefs and share them with each other. However, the two accounts are in conflict. In this paper I explore the consequences of holding on to the claim that beliefs have centered content. If we do in fact express the centered content of our beliefs, the content of the belief the hearer acquires cannot in general (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Antony Aumann (2010). Kierkegaard on Indirect Communication, the Crowd, and a Monstrous Illusion. In Robert L. Perkins (ed.), International Kierkegaard Commentary: Point of View. Mercer University Press.score: 18.0
    Following the pattern set by the early German Romantics, Kierkegaard conveys many of his insights through literature rather than academic prose. What makes him a valuable member of this tradition is the theory he develops to support it, his so-called “theory of indirect communication.” The most exciting aspect of this theory concerns the alleged importance of indirect communication: Kierkegaard claims that there are some projects only it can accomplish. This paper provides a critical account of two arguments Kierkegaard (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Anne E. McGuire & Rod Michalko (2011). Minds Between Us: Autism, Mindblindness and the Uncertainty of Communication. Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (2):162-177.score: 18.0
    This paper problematizes contemporary cultural understandings of autism. We make use of the developmental psychology concepts of ‘Theory of Mind’ and ‘mindblindness’ to uncover the meaning of autism as expressed in these concepts. Our concern is that autism is depicted as a puzzle and that this depiction governs not only the way Western culture treats autism but also the way in which it governs everyday interactions with autistic people. Moreover, we show how the concepts of Theory of Mind and mindblindness (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000