Search results for '*Vision' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
  1. Gerald Vision (1997). Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 27.0
    In this book Gerald Vision argues for a new causal theory, one that engages provocatively with direct realism and makes no use of a now discredited subjectivism.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. David Bourget, A General Reply to the Arguments From Blur, Double Vision, Perspective, and Other Kinds of Perceptual Distortion Against Representationalism.score: 24.0
    This paper offers a general reply to arguments from perceptual distortion (e.g. blur, perspective, double vision) against the representationalist thesis that the phenomenal characters of experiences supervene on their intentional contents. It has been argued that distorted and undistorted experiences are counterexamples to this thesis because they can share contents without sharing phenomenal characters. In reply, I suggest that cases of perceptual distortion do not constitute counterexamples to the representationalist thesis because the contents of distorted experiences are always impoverished in (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Alia Al-Saji (2009). A Phenomenology of Critical-Ethical Vision: Merleau-Ponty, Bergson, and the Question of Seeing Differently. Chiasmi International 11:375-398.score: 24.0
    Drawing on Merleau-Ponty’s “Eye and Mind” and Bergson’s Matière et mémoire and “La perception du changement,” I ask what resources are available in vision for interrupting objectifying habits of seeing. While both Bergson and Merleau-Ponty locate the possibility of seeing differently in the figure of the painter, I develop by means of their texts, and in dialogue with Iris Marion Young’s work, a more general phenomenology of hesitation that grounds what I am calling “critical-ethical vision.” Hesitation, I argue, stems from (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. Robert Schroer (2002). Seeing It All Clearly: The Real Story on Blurry Vision. American Philosophical Quarterly 39 (3):297-301.score: 24.0
    Representationalism is the position that the phenomenal character of a perceptual experience supervenes upon its representational content. The phenomenon of blurry vision is thought to raise a difficulty for this position. More specifically, it is alleged that representationalists cannot account for the phenomenal difference between clearly seeing an indistinct edge and blurrily seeing a distinct edge solely in terms of represented features of the surrounding environment. I defend representationalism from this objection by offering a novel account of the phenomenal difference (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (1999). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? The Case for Cognitive Impenetrability of Visual Perception. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 24.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to general cognition. This paper sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, Psychophysics, perceptual learning and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, which may be called early vision or just vision, (...)
    Direct download (21 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Berit Brogaard (2011). Conscious Vision for Action Versus Unconscious Vision for Action? Cognitive Science 35 (6):1076-1104.score: 24.0
    David Milner and Melvyn Goodale’s dissociation hypothesis is commonly taken to state that there are two functionally specialized cortical streams of visual processing originating in striate (V1) cortex: a dorsal, action-related “unconscious” stream and a ventral, perception-related “conscious” stream. As Milner and Goodale acknowledge, findings from blindsight studies suggest a more sophisticated picture that replaces the distinction between unconscious vision for action and conscious vision for perception with a tripartite division between unconscious vision for action, conscious vision for perception, and (...)
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Wayne Wu (2013). Visual Spatial Constancy and Modularity: Does Intention Penetrate Vision? Philosophical Studies 165 (2):647-669.score: 24.0
    Is vision informationally encapsulated from cognition or is it cognitively penetrated? I shall argue that intentions penetrate vision in the experience of visual spatial constancy: the world appears to be spatially stable despite our frequent eye movements. I explicate the nature of this experience and critically examine and extend current neurobiological accounts of spatial constancy, emphasizing the central role of motor signals in computing such constancy. I then provide a stringent condition for failure of informational encapsulation that emphasizes a computational (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. P. S. Kitcher (1988). Marr's Computational Theory of Vision. Philosophy of Science 55 (March):1-24.score: 24.0
    David Marr's theory of vision has been widely cited by philosophers and psychologists. I have three projects in this paper. First, I try to offer a perspicuous characterization of Marr's theory. Next, I consider the implications of Marr's work for some currently popular philosophies of psychology, specifically, the "hegemony of neurophysiology view", the theories of Jerry Fodor, Daniel Dennett, and Stephen Stich, and the view that perception is permeated by belief. In the last section, I consider what the phenomenon of (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2000). Is Vision Continuous with Cognition? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (3):341-365.score: 24.0
    Although the study of visual perception has made more progress in the past 40 years than any other area of cognitive science, there remain major disagreements as to how closely vision is tied to cognition. This target article sets out some of the arguments for both sides (arguments from computer vision, neuroscience, psychophysics, perceptual learning, and other areas of vision science) and defends the position that an important part of visual perception, corresponding to what some people have called early vision, (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. John L. Pollock & Iris Oved (2005). Vision, Knowledge, and the Mystery Link. Noûs 39 (1):309-351.score: 24.0
    Imagine yourself sitting on your front porch, sipping your morning coffee and admiring the scene before you. You see trees, houses, people, automobiles; you see a cat running across the road, and a bee buzzing among the flowers. You see that the flowers are yellow, and blowing in the wind. You see that the people are moving about, many of them on bicycles. You see that the houses are painted different colors, mostly earth tones, and most are one-story but a (...)
    Direct download (14 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2001). Connecting Vision with the World: Tracking the Missing Link. In Joao Branquinho (ed.), The Foundations of Cognitive Science. Oxford: Clarendon Press. 183.score: 24.0
    You might reasonably surmise from the title of this paper that I will be discussing a theory of vision. After all, what is a theory of vision but a theory of how the world is connected to our visual representations? Theories of visual perception universally attempt to give an account of how a proximal stimulus (presumably a pattern impinging on the retina) can lead to a rich representation of a three dimensional world and thence to either the recognition of known (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004/2005). Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of events (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Evan Thompson (1995). Colour Vision, Evolution, and Perceptual Content. Synthese 104 (1):1-32.score: 24.0
    b>. Computational models of colour vision assume that the biological function of colour vision is to detect surface reflectance. Some philosophers invoke these models as a basis for 'externalism' about perceptual content (content is distal) and 'objectivism' about colour (colour is surface reflectance). In an earlier article (Thompson et al. 1992), I criticized the 'computational objectivist' position on the basis of comparative colour vision: There are fundmental differences among the colour vision of animals and these differences do not converge on (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Margaret Atherton (1990). Berkeley's Revolution in Vision. Cornell University Press.score: 24.0
    Introduction In 1709 George Berkeley published his first substantial work, An Essay towards a New Theory of Vision. As a contribution to the theory of ...
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. Cathryn Vasseleu (1998). Textures of Light: Vision and Touch in Irigaray, Levinas, and Merleau-Ponty. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Light has often been privileged as a metaphor for objectivity and truth in Western thought, a status that has been challenged by recent feminist thought as giving entitlement to the masculine. This book presents a compelling new perspective on this metaphor, and explores the role the visual plays in Western philosophy by examining the thought of Irigaray, Levinas and Merleau- Ponty. Textures of Light is one of the first studies to challenge current interpretations by presenting Irigaray as a philosopher of (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Evan Thompson (1995). Colour Vision: A Study in Cognitive Science and the Philosophy of Perception. New York: Routledge.score: 24.0
    This book is a major contribution to the interdisciplinary project of investigating the true nature of color vision. In recent times, research into color vision has been one of the main success stories of cognitive science. Each discipline in the field--neuroscience, psychology, linguistics, computer science and philosophy--has contributed significantly to our understanding of color. Evan Thompson provides an accessible review of current scientific and philosophical discussions of color vision. He steers a course between the subjective and objective positions on color, (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Wayne Wright (2006). Visual Stuff and Active Vision. Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):129-149.score: 24.0
    This paper examines the status of unattended visual stimuli in the light of recent work on the role of attention in visual perception. Although the question of whether attention is required for visual experience seems very interesting, this paper argues that there currently is no good reason to take a stand on the issue. Moreover, it is argued that much of the allure of that question stems from a continued attachment to the defective ‘inner picture view’ of experience and a (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Dingmar Van Eck, Huib Looren De Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2006). Evaluating New Wave Reductionism: The Case of Vision. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (1):167-196.score: 24.0
    Faculty Of Philosophy, Tilburg University, P.O. Box 90153, 5000 LE Tilburg, The Netherlands m.k.d.schouten{at}uvt.nl' + u + '@' + d + ''//--> This paper inquires into the nature of intertheoretic relations between psychology and neuroscience. This relationship has been characterized by some as one in which psychological explanations eventually will fall away as otiose, overthrown completely by neurobiological ones. Against this view it will be argued that it squares poorly with scientific practices and empirical developments in the cognitive neurosciences. We (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. Robert Hopkins (1997). El Greco's Eyesight: Interpreting Pictures and the Psychology of Vision. Philosophical Quarterly 47 (189):441-458.score: 24.0
    There is a common assumption about pictures, that seeing them produces in us something like the same effects as seeing the things they depict. This assumption lies behind much empirical research into vision, where experiments often expose subjects to pictures of things in order to investigate the processes involved in cognizing those things themselves. Can philosophy provide any justification for this assumption? I examine this issue in the context of Flint Schier's account of pictorial representation. Schier attempts to infer the (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. W. R. Webster (2003). Revelation and Transparency in Colour Vision Refuted: A Case of Mind/Brain Identity and Another Bridge Over the Explanatory Gap. Synthese 133 (3):419-39.score: 24.0
    Russell (1912) and others have argued that the real nature of colour is transparentto us in colour vision. It's nature is fully revealed to us and no further knowledgeis theoretically possible. This is the doctrine of revelation. Two-dimensionalFourier analyses of coloured checkerboards have shown that apparently simple,monadic, colours can be based on quite different physical mechanisms. Experimentswith the McCollough effect on different types of checkerboards have shown thatidentical colours can have energy at the quite different orientations of Fourierharmonic components but (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. Richard J. Hall (1996). The Evolution of Color Vision Without Colors. Philosophy of Science Supplement 63 (3):125-33.score: 24.0
    The standard adaptationist explanation of the presence of a sensory mechanism in an organism--that it detects properties useful to the organism--cannot be given for color vision. This is because colors do not exist. After arguing for this latter claim, I consider, but reject, nonadaptationist explanations. I conclude by proposing an explanation of how color vision could have adaptive value even though it does not detect properties in the environment.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. Susan Bredlau (2011). Monstrous Faces and a World Transformed: Merleau-Ponty, Dolezal, and the Enactive Approach on Vision Without Inversion of the Retinal Image. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 10 (4):481-498.score: 24.0
    The world perceived by a person undergoing vision without inversion of the retinal image has traditionally been described as inverted. Drawing on the philosophical work of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and the empirical research of Hubert Dolezal, I argue that this description is more reflective of a representationist conception of vision than of actual visual experience. The world initially perceived in vision without inversion of the retinal image is better described as lacking in lived significance rather than inverted; vision without inversion of (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. Richard Montgomery (1996). The Indeterminacy of Color Vision. Synthese 106 (2):167-203.score: 24.0
    A critical survey of recent work on the ontological status of colors supports the conclusion that, while some accounts of color can plausibly be dismissed, no single account can yet be endorsed. Among the remaining options are certain forms of color realism according which familiar colors are instantiated by objects in our extra-cranial visual environment. Also still an option is color anti-realism, the view that familiar colors are, at best, biologically adaptive fictions, instantiated nowhere.I argue that there is simply no (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Dhanraj Vishwanath (2005). The Epistemological Status of Vision and its Implications for Design. Axiomathes 15 (3):399-486.score: 24.0
    Computational theories of vision typically rely on the analysis of two aspects of human visual function: (1) object and shape recognition (2) co-calibration of sensory measurements. Both these approaches are usually based on an inverse-optics model, where visual perception is viewed as a process of inference from a 2D retinal projection to a 3D percept within a Euclidean space schema. This paradigm has had great success in certain areas of vision science, but has been relatively less successful in understanding perceptual (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Julia Colterjohn & Duncan MacIntosh (1987). Gerald Vision and Indexicals. Analysis 47 (1):58-60.score: 24.0
    The indexical thesis says that the indexical terms, “I”, “here” and “now” necessarily refer to the person, place and time of utterance, respectively, with the result that the sentence, “I am here now” cannot express a false proposition. Gerald Vision offers supposed counter-examples: he says, “I am here now”, while pointing to the wrong place on a map; or he says it in a note he puts in the kitchen for his wife so she’ll know he’s home even though he’s (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Lawrence A. Shapiro (1997). A Clearer Vision. Philosophy of Science 64 (1):131-53.score: 24.0
    Frances Egan argues that the states of computational theories of vision are individuated individualistically and, as far as the theory is concerned, are not intentional. Her argument depends on equating the goals and explanatory strategies of computational psychology with those of its algorithmic level. However, closer inspection of computational psychology reveals that the computational level plays an essential role in explaining visual processes and that explanations at this level are nonindividualistic and intentional. In conclusion, I sketch an account of content (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Assaf Weksler, Visual Perspective: A Philosophical Challenge to Vision Science.score: 24.0
    According to an influential philosophical view I call “the relational properties view” (RPV), “2D” properties, such as the elliptical appearance of a tilted coin, are relational properties of external objects. Vision scientists typically hold that 2D properties are properties of patterns of light striking the retina (or of regions in the retina). Call this view RET. RET conflicts with RPV. The present paper has two objectives. The first is to argue that there is no genuine conflict between vision science and (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. Evan Thompson (1995). Colour Vision. Routledge.score: 24.0
    This book is a major contribution to the interdisciplinary project of investigating the true nature of color vision.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. D. C. McCarty (2000). Optics of Thought: Logic and Vision in Müller, Helmholtz, and Frege. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 41 (4):365-378.score: 24.0
    The historical antecedents of Frege's treatment of binocular vision in "The thought" were the physiological writings of Johannes Mueller, Hermann von Helmholtz, and Emil du Bois-Reymond. In their research on human vision, logic was assigned an unexpected role: it was to be the means by which knowledge of a world extended in three dimensions arises from stimuli that are at best two-dimensional. An examination of this literature yields a richer understanding of Frege's insistence that a proper epistemology requires us to (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. P. Morton (1993). Supervenience and Computational Explanation in Vision Theory. Philosophy of Science 60 (1):86-99.score: 24.0
    According to Marr's theory of vision, computational processes of early vision rely for their success on certain "natural constraints" in the physical environment. I examine the implications of this feature of Marr's theory for the question whether psychological states supervene on neural states. It is reasonable to hold that Marr's theory is nonindividualistic in that, given the role of natural constraints, distinct computational theories of the same neural processes may be justified in different environments. But to avoid trivializing computational explanations, (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Stuart Clark (2007). Vanities of the Eye: Vision in Early Modern European Culture. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Species : visions and values -- Fantasies : seeing without what was within -- Prestiges : illusions in magic and art -- Glamours : demons and virtual worlds -- Images : the reformation of the eyes -- Apparitions : the discernment of spirits -- Sights : King Saul and King Macbeth -- Seemings : philosophical scepticism -- Dreams : the epistemology of sleep -- Signs : vision and the new philosophy.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Paul Gibbs (2011). The Concept of Profound Boredom: Learning From Moments of Vision. Studies in Philosophy and Education 30 (6):601-613.score: 24.0
    This paper recognizes that we become bored in our post-modern, consumerist Western world and that boredom is related to this existence and hidden within it. Through Heidegger, it seeks to provide a way to structure our understanding of boredom and suggest ways of acknowledging its cause, and then to allow it to liberate our authentic appreciation of the world of our workplace and what can be learnt through it. Using the approach of focusing on being in a societal workplace environment, (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jan Degenaar (2014). Through the Inverting Glass: First-Person Observations on Spatial Vision and Imagery. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 13 (2):373-393.score: 24.0
    Experience with inverting glasses reveals key factors of spatial vision. Interpretations of the literature based on the metaphor of a “visual image” have raised the question whether visual experience with inverting glasses remains inverted or whether it may turn back to normal after adaptation to the glasses. Here, I report on my experience with left/right inverting glasses and argue that a more fine-grained sensorimotor analysis can resolve the issue. Crucially, inverting glasses introduce a conflict at the very heart of spatial (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Daniel Holender (1986). Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification in Dichotic Listening, Parafoveal Vision, and Visual Masking: A Survey and Appraisal. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):1-23.score: 24.0
    When the stored representation of the meaning of a stimulus is accessed through the processing of a sensory input it is maintained in an activated state for a certain amount of time that allows for further processing. This semantic activation is generally accompanied by conscious identification, which can be demonstrated by the ability of a person to perform discriminations on the basis of the meaning of the stimulus. The idea that a sensory input can give rise to semantic activation without (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Josué Antonio Nescolarde-Selva & Josep-Lluis Usó-Doménech (2014). Semiotic Vision of Ideologies. Foundations of Science 19 (3):263-282.score: 24.0
    A semiotic theory of systems derived from language would have the purpose of classifying all the systems of linguistic expression: philosophy, ideology, myth, poetry, art, as much as the dream, lapsus, and free association in a pluridimensional matrix that will interact with many diversified fields. In each one of these discourses it is necessary to consider a plurality of questions, the essence of which will only be comprehensible by the totality; it will be necessary to ask, in the first place, (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Ruth Rosenholtz, Jie Huang & Krista A. Ehinger (2012). Rethinking the Role of Top-Down Attention in Vision: Effects Attributable to a Lossy Representation in Peripheral Vision. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Common wisdom in the field of human vision suggests that top-down selective attention is required in order to bind features into objects. Without selective attention, presumably we are unable even to distinguish such simple stimuli as a rotated T vs. a rotated L. Selective attention, in turn, is often described as volitional and involving intentionality, suggesting – implicitly or explicitly – that it requires awareness. The resulting implication that we might need so expensive (and possibly human) a resource as consciousness (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Helen Borland & Adam Lindgreen (2013). Sustainability, Epistemology, Ecocentric Business, and Marketing Strategy: Ideology, Reality, and Vision. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 117 (1):173-187.score: 24.0
    This conceptual article examines the relationship between marketing and sustainability through the dual lenses of anthropocentric and ecocentric epistemology. Using the current anthropocentric epistemology and its associated dominant social paradigm, corporate ecological sustainability in commercial practice and business school research and teaching is difficult to achieve. However, adopting an ecocentric epistemology enables the development of an alternative business and marketing approach that places equal importance on nature, the planet, and ecological sustainability as the source of human and other species’ well-being, (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Isabel Iribarren (2008). Consensus et dissidence à la cour papale d'Avignon. Le cas de la controverse sur la vision béatifique. Revue des Sciences Religieuses 82:107-126.score: 24.0
    La controverse sur la vision béatifique qui a lieu à Avignon entre 1331 et 1334 est déclenchée par un sermon du pape Jean XXII qui va à l’encontre de l’opinion reçue des maîtres en théologie. Le débat qui en résulte offre un cadre privilégié pour étudier le rapport d’autorité doctrinale entre le pape et les théologiens. Une question se pose : la capacité normative des maîtres en matière de doctrine constitue-t-elle une autorité rivale ou complémentaire du magistère pontifical ? L’enjeu (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. Alain Lernould (2005). Plutarque, Sur l' E de Delphes 390 B 6-8 et l'explication de la vision en Timée 45 b-d. Methodos 5.score: 24.0
    Le traité (ou dialogue) « pythique » du platonicien Plutarque de Chéronée (Iier – IIe s. ap. J.-C.) intitulé Sur l’E de Delphes est consacré à l’élucidation de la signification de l’E (la cinquième lettre de l’alphabet grec) consacré à Apollon Pythien. Une des interprétations (d’inspiration pythagoricienne) est que cet E désigne le nombre cinq, le nombre de l’univers. Dans le cadre de l’exposé de cette interprétation est fait état de l’opinion « de certains » selon laquelle il existe une (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Vanessa Tabry, Robert J. Zatorre & Patrice Voss (2013). The Influence of Vision on Sound Localization Abilities in Both the Horizontal and Vertical Planes. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 24.0
    Numerous recent reports have suggested that individuals deprived of vision are able to develop heightened auditory spatial abilities. However, most such studies have compared the blind to blindfolded sighted individuals, a procedure that might introduce a strong performance bias. Indeed, while blind individuals have had their whole lives to adapt to this condition, sighted individuals might be put at a severe disadvantage when having to localize sounds without visual input. To address this unknown, we compared the sound localization ability of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. Enrique Aramendia Muneta (2013). La visión en Marr y Berkeley. El problema de perderse el principio de la película. Daímon 59:125-144.score: 24.0
    Se comparan las teorías de Marr y Berkeley sobre la visión a partir de las cualidades de Descartes. La descripción de tres niveles de Marr, donde la conciencia está ausente, contrasta con el nivel único de Berkeley construido sobre la conciencia y la experiencia carece de importancia en los momentos esquemáticos y cobra protagonismo en el último paso del proceso de la visión de Marr mediante la noción de marcación. Bajo la premisa de que las descripciones puramente sincrónicas han de (...)
    No categories
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Ryad Benosman (2010). Vision Without Frames: A Semiotic Paradigm of Event Based Computer Vision. [REVIEW] Biosemiotics 3 (1):1-16.score: 24.0
    Conventional imagers and almost all vision processes use and rely on theories that are based on the principle of static image-frames. A frame is a 2D matrix that represents the spatial locations of intensities of a scene projected on the imager. The notion of a frame itself is so embedded in machine vision, that it is usually taken for granted that this is how biological systems store light information. This paper presents a biosinpired event-based image formation principle, which output data (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. J. Campion, R. Latto & Y. Smith (1983). Is Blindsight an Effect of Scattered Light, Spared Cortex, and Near-Threshold Vision? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (3):423-86.score: 24.0
    Blindsight is the term commonly used to describe visually guided behaviour elicited by a stimulus falling within the scotoma (blind area) caused by a lesion of the striate cortex. Such is normally held to be unconscious and to be mediated by subcortical pathways involving the superior colliculus. Blindsight is of considerable theoretical importance since it suggests that destriate man is more like destriate monkey than had been previously believed and also because it supports the classical notion of two visual systems. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Jaro Kotalik, Cathy Covino, Nadine Doucette, Steve Henderson, Michelle Langlois, Karen McDaid & Louisa M. Pedri (2014). Framework for Ethical Decision-Making Based on Mission, Vision and Values of the Institution. HEC Forum 26 (2):125-133.score: 24.0
    The authors led the development of a framework for ethical decision-making for an Academic Health Sciences Centre. They understood the existing mission, vision, and values statement (MVVs) of the centre as a foundational assertion that embodies an ethical commitment of the institution. Reflecting the Patient and Family Centred Model of Care the institution is living, the MVVs is a suitable base on which to construct an ethics framework. The resultant framework consists of a set of questions for each of the (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. Golan Levin (2006). Computer Vision for Artists and Designers: Pedagogic Tools and Techniques for Novice Programmers. [REVIEW] AI and Society 20 (4):462-482.score: 24.0
    This article attempts to demystify computer vision for novice programmers through a survey of new applications in the arts, system design considerations, and contemporary tools. It introduces the concept and gives a brief history of computer vision within interactive art from Myron Kruger to the present. Basic techniques of computer vision such as detecting motion and object tracking are discussed in addition to various software applications created for exploring the topic. As an example, the results of a one-week machine vision (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. Timothée Masquelier, Larissa Albantakis & Gustavo Deco (2011). The Timing of Vision – How Neural Processing Links to Different Temporal Dynamics. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 24.0
    We review here our recent attempts to model the neural correlates of visual perception with biologically-inspired networks of spiking neurons, emphasizing the dynamical aspects. Experimental evidence suggests distinct processing modes depending on the type of task the visual system is engaged in. A first mode deals with rapidly extracting the glimpse of a visual scene in the first 100ms after its presentation. The promptness of this process points to mainly feedforward processing, which may be shaped by Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity. Our (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. George Berkeley (1963/1981). Works on Vision. Greenwood Press.score: 24.0
    A treatise concerning the principles of human knowledge -- An essay towards a new theory of vision -- Alciphron, the fourth dialogue (excerpts) -- The theory of vision.
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Robert Briscoe (2008). Vision, Action, and Make‐Perceive. Mind and Language 23 (4):457-497.score: 21.0
    In this paper, I critically assess the enactive account of visual perception recently defended by Alva Noë (2004). I argue inter alia that the enactive account falsely identifies an object’s apparent shape with its 2D perspectival shape; that it mistakenly assimilates visual shape perception and volumetric object recognition; and that it seriously misrepresents the constitutive role of bodily action in visual awareness. I argue further that noticing an object’s perspectival shape involves a hybrid experience combining both perceptual and imaginative elements (...)
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. David Lewis (1980). Veridical Hallucination and Prosthetic Vision. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 58 (September):239-249.score: 21.0
  50. Ned Block (2013). The Grain of Vision and the Grain of Attention. Thought, A Journal of Philosophy 1 (2):170-184.score: 21.0
    Often when there is no attention to an object, there is no conscious perception of it either, leading some to conclude that conscious perception is an attentional phenomenon. There is a well-known perceptual phenomenon—visuo-spatial crowding, in which objects are too closely packed for attention to single out one of them. This article argues that there is a variant of crowding—what I call ‘‘identity-crowding’’—in which one can consciously see a thing despite failure of attention to it. This conclusion, together with new (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000