Search results for '*Visual Attention' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Victor A. F. Lamme (2003). Why Visual Attention and Awareness Are Different. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (1):12-18.
  2.  37
    Wayne Wu (forthcoming). Shaking Up the Mind's Ground Floor: The Cognitive Penetration of Visual Attention. Journal of Philosophy.
    In this paper, I argue that visual attention is cognitively penetrated by intention. I present a detailed account of attention and its neural basis, drawing on a recent computational model of neural modulation during attention: divisive normalization. I argue that intention shifts computations during divisive normalization. The epistemic consequences of attentional bias are discussed.
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  3.  69
    Victor A. F. Lamme (2004). Separate Neural Definitions of Visual Consciousness and Visual Attention: A Case for Phenomenal Awareness. Neural Networks 17 (5):861-872.
  4.  4
    Peter U. Tse (2004). Mapping Visual Attention with Change Blindness: New Directions for a New Method. Cognitive Science 28 (2):241.
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  5.  81
    James Stazicker (2011). Attention, Visual Consciousness and Indeterminacy. Mind and Language 26 (2):156-184.
    I propose a new argument showing that conscious vision sometimes depends constitutively on conscious attention. I criticise traditional arguments for this constitutive connection, on the basis that they fail adequately to dissociate evidence about visual consciousness from evidence about attention. On the same basis, I criticise Ned Block's recent counterargument that conscious vision is independent of one sort of attention (‘cognitive access'). Block appears to achieve the dissociation only because he underestimates the indeterminacy of visual consciousness. I (...)
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  6.  7
    J. T. Serences & S. Yantis (2006). Selective Visual Attention and Perceptual Coherence. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (1):38-45.
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  7. Victor A. F. Lamme (2005). Independent Neural Definitions of Visual Awareness and Attention. In Athanassios Raftopoulos (ed.), Cognitive Penetrability of Perception: Attention, Action, Strategies, and Bottom-Up Constraints. Nova Science Publishers 171-191.
  8.  12
    Richard D. Wright (ed.) (1998). Visual Attention. Oxford University Press.
    This book contains a rich, interdisciplinary collection of articles by some of the pioneers of contemporary research on attention.
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  9. Wayne Wu (2008). Visual Attention, Conceptual Content, and Doing It Right. Mind 117 (468):1003-1033.
    Reflection on the fine-grained information required for visual guidance of action has suggested that visual content is non-conceptual. I argue that in a common type of visually guided action, namely the use of manipulable artefacts, vision has conceptual content. Specifically, I show that these actions require visual attention and that concepts are involved in directing attention. In acting with artefacts, there is a way of doing it right as determined by the artefact’s conventional use. Attention must reflect (...)
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  10.  26
    Luiz Pessoa (2005). To What Extent Are Emotional Visual Stimuli Processed Without Attention and Awareness? Current Opinion in Neurobiology 15 (2):188-196.
  11.  58
    Mika Koivisto & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Electrophysiological Correlates of Visual Consciousness and Selective Attention. Neuroreport 18 (8):753-756.
  12. C. Bundesen & T. Habekost (2008). Principles of Visual Attention: Linking Mind and Brain. Oxford University Press Oxford.
    The nature of attention is one of the oldest and most central problems in psychology. A huge amount of research has been produced on this subject in the last half century, especially on attention in the visual modality, but a general explanation has remained elusive. Many still view attention research as a field that is fundamentally fragmented. This book takes a different perspective and presents a unified theory of visual attention: the TVA model. The TVA model (...)
     
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  13.  5
    Jeffrey P. Sutton, Cynthia D. Rittenhouse, Edward Pace-Schott, Robert Stickgold & J. Allan Hobson (1994). A New Approach to Dream Bizarreness: Graphing Continuity and Discontinuity of Visual Attention in Narrative Reports. Consciousness and Cognition 3 (1):61-88.
    In this paper, a new method of quantitatively assessing continuity and discontinuity of visual attention is developed. The method is based on representing narrative information using graph theory. It is applicable to any type of narrative report. Since dream reports are often described as bizarre, and since bizarreness is partially characterized by discontinuities in plot, we chose to test our method on a set of dream data. Using specific criteria for identifying and arranging objects of visual attention, dream (...)
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  14.  20
    Ronald A. Rensink, The Management of Visual Attention in Graphic Displays.
    This chapter presents an overview of several recent developments in vision science, and outlines some of their implications for the management of visual attention in graphic displays. These include ways of sending attention to the right item at the right time, techniques to improve attentional efficiency, and possibilities for offloading some of the processing typically done by attention onto nonattentional mechanisms. In addition it is argued that such techniques not only allow more effective use to be made (...)
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  15.  2
    Marie-Line Bosse, Marie-Josèphe Tainturier & Sylviane Valdois (2007). Developmental Dyslexia: The Visual Attention Span Deficit Hypothesis. Cognition 104 (2):198-230.
    The visual attention (VA) span is defined as the amount of distinct visual elements which can be processed in parallel in a multi-element array. Both recent empirical data and theoretical accounts suggest that a VA span deficit might contribute to developmental dyslexia, independently of a phonological disorder. In this study, this hypothesis was assessed in two large samples of French and British dyslexic children whose performance was compared to that of chronological-age matched control children. Results of the French study (...)
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  16.  1
    Steven J. Luck & Nancy J. Beach (1998). Visual Attention and the Binding Problem: A Neurophysiological Perspective. In Richard D. Wright (ed.), Visual Attention. Oxford University Press 455--478.
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  17.  14
    Daniel T. Levin, Sarah B. Drivdahl, Nausheen Momen & Melissa R. Beck (2002). False Predictions About the Detectability of Visual Changes: The Role of Beliefs About Attention, Memory, and the Continuity of Attended Objects in Causing Change Blindness Blindness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):507-527.
    Recently, a number of experiments have emphasized the degree to which subjects fail to detect large changes in visual scenes. This finding, referred to as “change blindness,” is often considered surprising because many people have the intuition that such changes should be easy to detect. Levin, Momen, Drivdahl, and Simons documented this intuition by showing that the majority of subjects believe they would notice changes that are actually very rarely detected. Thus subjects exhibit a metacognitive error we refer to as (...)
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  18.  6
    Marianne Gullberg & Kenneth Holmqvist (2006). What Speakers Do and What Addressees Look At: Visual Attention to Gestures in Human Interaction Live and on Video. Pragmatics and Cognition 14 (1):53-84.
    This study investigates whether addressees visually attend to speakers¿ gestures in interaction and whether attention is modulated by changes in social setting and display size. We compare a live face-to-face setting to two video conditions. In all conditions, the face dominates as a fixation target and only a minority of gestures draw fixations. The social and size parameters affect gaze mainly when combined and in the opposite direction from the predicted with fewer gestures fixated on video than live. Gestural (...)
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  19.  22
    Mika Koivisto, Antti Revonsuo & Minna Lehtonen (2006). Independence of Visual Awareness From the Scope of Attention: An Electrophysiological Study. Cerebral Cortex 16 (3):415-424.
  20.  4
    MaryLou Cheal (1997). Understanding Diverse Effects of Visual Attention with the VAP-Filters Metaphor. Consciousness and Cognition 6 (2-3):348-362.
    The Variable and Permeable Filters metaphor is presented with an explanation of its advantages over other popular metaphors in accounting for attention effects in many different research paradigms. Research from laboratories of the author and others are discussed briefly and shown to result in diverse facilitatory and inhibitory attention effects on visual perception. All of these effects are consistent with the VAP-Filters metaphor.
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  21.  4
    David Cornberg (2009). Power, Complexity and Post-Visual Attention. Cultura 6 (2):78-84.
    The transition from modernity to post-modernity features changes in values amplified by an enormous increase in visual stimuli. This increase motivates analysis of the power of attention to create the present. Complexity theory illuminates this power and leads to the startling conclusion that we spend much of our waking life in a gap of nonexistence.
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  22.  13
    Cyril Latimer (1999). Is There More to Visual Attention Than Meets the Eye? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):690-691.
    Models of saccade generation and visual selective attention must explain how and why particular targets are selected. Findlay & Walker do an excellent job of explaining the how of visual selection, but not the why. For a salience map to be more than a description of the relative importance of potential targets, there must be some account of the learning and inheritance that fashion its peaks and troughs. Point of gaze is not necessarily region of attention, and it (...)
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  23.  9
    E. Awh, K. M. Armstrong & T. Moore (2006). Visual and Oculomotor Selection: Links, Causes and Implications for Spatial Attention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (3):124-130.
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  24.  55
    Charles H. Anderson, David C. Van Essen & Bruno A. Olshausen (2005). Directed Visual Attention and the Dynamic Control of Information Flow. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press
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  25.  52
    R. Desimone & J. Duncan (1995). Neural Mechanisms of Selective Visual Attention. Annual Review of Neuroscience 18 (1):193-222.
  26. Piotr Jaskoski, Rob H. J. van der Lubbe, Erik Schlotterbeck & Rolf Verleger (2002). Traces Left on Visual Selective Attention by Stimuli That Are Not Consciously Identified. Psychological Science 13 (1):48-54.
  27.  5
    Charles S. Harris & Ralph Norman Haber (1963). Selective Attention and Coding in Visual Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 65 (4):328.
  28.  4
    Ralph Norman Haber (1964). A Replication of Selective Attention and Coding in Visual Perception. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (4):402.
  29.  1
    Lance K. Canon (1971). Directed Attention and Maladaptive "Adaptation" to Displacement of the Visual Field. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (3):403.
  30.  1
    Robert G. Webster & George M. Haslerud (1964). Influence on Extreme Peripheral Vision of Attention to a Visual or Auditory Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (3):269.
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  31.  0
    L. E. Travis & M. E. Hall (1938). Effect of Visual After-Sensations Upon Brain Potential Patterning Under Different Degrees of Attention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 22 (5):472.
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  32.  3
    B. Fischer & H. Weber (1993). Express Saccades and Visual Attention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 16 (3):553.
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  33.  4
    Jay Friedenberg (2013). Visual Attention and Consciousness. Psychology Press.
    The systematic review of key topics and the multitude of perspectives make this book an ideal primary or ancillary text for graduate courses in perception, vision, consciousness, or philosophy of mind.
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  34.  24
    Imogen Dickie (2011). Visual Attention Fixes Demonstrative Reference By Eliminating Referential Luck. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press
  35.  55
    Daniel Collerton, Elaine Perry & Ian McKeith (2005). Why People See Things That Are Not There: A Novel Perception and Attention Deficit Model for Recurrent Complex Visual Hallucinations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (6):737-757.
    As many as two million people in the United Kingdom repeatedly see people, animals, and objects that have no objective reality. Hallucinations on the border of sleep, dementing illnesses, delirium, eye disease, and schizophrenia account for 90% of these. The remainder have rarer disorders. We review existing models of recurrent complex visual hallucinations (RCVH) in the awake person, including cortical irritation, cortical hyperexcitability and cortical release, top-down activation, misperception, dream intrusion, and interactive models. We provide evidence that these can neither (...)
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  36.  23
    John Campbell (2011). Visual Attention and the Epistemic Role of Consciousness. In Christopher Mole, Declan Smithies & Wayne Wu (eds.), Attention: Philosophical and Psychological Essays. Oxford University Press 323.
  37. M. M. Chun (2005). Contextual Guidance of Visual Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press 246--250.
  38. G. Deco, E. T. Rolls & J. Zihl (2005). A Neurodynamical Model of Visual Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press 593--599.
  39. A. Martinez & S. A. Hillyard (2005). Electrophysiological and Neuroimaging Approaches to the Study of Visual Attention. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press 507--513.
  40. Luiz Pessoa & Leslie G. Ungerleider (2005). Visual Attention and Emotional Perception. In Laurent Itti, Geraint Rees & John K. Tsotsos (eds.), Neurobiology of Attention. Academic Press
  41.  8
    Marvin M. Chun (2000). Contextual Cueing of Visual Attention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 4 (5):170-178.
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  42.  75
    Stefanie Hüttermann & Daniel Memmert (forthcoming). The Influence of Motivational and Mood States on Visual Attention: A Quantification of Systematic Differences and Casual Changes in Subjects' Focus of Attention. Cognition and Emotion:1-13.
  43.  2
    Marie-Line Bosse, Marie Josèphe Tainturier & Sylviane Valdois (2007). Developmental Dyslexia: The Visual Attention Span Deficit Hypothesis. Cognition 104 (2):198-230.
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  44.  9
    R. Egly, J. Driver & R. D. Rafal (1994). Shifting Visual Attention Between Objects and Locations: Evidence From Normal and Parietal Lesion Subjects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 123 (2):161-177.
  45.  40
    Ken Nakayama, Vera Maljkovic & Arni Kristjansson (2004). 29 Short-Term Memory for the Rapid Deployment of Visual Attention. In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The Cognitive Neurosciences Iii. MIT Press 397.
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  46.  3
    Tobias Brosch, Didier Grandjean, David Sander & Klaus R. Scherer (2008). Behold the Voice of Wrath: Cross-Modal Modulation of Visual Attention by Anger Prosody. Cognition 106 (3):1497-1503.
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  47.  4
    Ian H. Gotlib, Anne L. McLachlan & Albert N. Katz (1988). Biases in Visual Attention in Depressed and Nondepressed Individuals. Cognition and Emotion 2 (3):185-200.
  48.  12
    Vilayanur S. Ramachandran & Steve Cobb (1995). Visual Attention Modulates Metacontrast Masking. Nature 373:66-68.
  49.  1
    Elaine Fox (1993). Allocation of Visual Attention and Anxiety. Cognition and Emotion 7 (2):207-215.
  50.  3
    George Butterworth (2004). Joint Visual Attention in Infancy. In Gavin Bremner & Alan Slater (eds.), Theories of Infant Development. Blackwell 317--354.
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