Search results for '*Visual Contrast' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Kristin Suzanne Cadenhead, Karen Dobkins, Jessica McGovern & Kathleen Shafer (2013). Schizophrenia Spectrum Participants Have Reduced Visual Contrast Sensitivity to Chromatic (Red/Green) and Luminance (Light/Dark) Stimuli: New Insights Into Information Processing, Visual Channel Function, and Antipsychotic Effects. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Background: Individuals with schizophrenia spectrum diagnoses have deficient visual information processing as assessed by a variety of paradigms including visual backward masking, motion perception and visual contrast sensitivity (VCS). In the present study, the VCS paradigm was used to investigate potential differences in magnocellular (M) versus parvocellular (P) channel function that might account for the observed information processing deficits of schizophrenia spectrum patients. Specifically, VCS for near threshold luminance (black/white) stimuli is known to be governed primarily by the M (...)
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  2. Miguel A. García-Pérez & Eli Peli (2011). Visual Contrast Processing is Largely Unaltered During Saccades. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 186.0
    Saccadic suppression refers to a reduction in visual sensitivity during saccadic eye movements. This reduction is conventionally regarded as mediated by either of two sources. One is a simple passive process of motion smear during saccades also accompanied by visual masking exerted by high-contrast pre- and post-saccadic images. The other is an active process exerted by a neural mechanism that turns off visual processing so that the perception of a stable visual environment is not disrupted during saccades. Some studies (...)
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  3. Ville Ojanen, Antti Revonsuo & Mikko Sams (2003). Visual Awareness of Low-Contrast Stimuli is Reflected in Event-Related Brain Potentials. Psychophysiology 40 (2):192-197.score: 180.0
  4. Martha Wilson (1972). Assimilation and Contrast Effects in Visual Discrimination by Rhesus Monkeys. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (2):279.score: 168.0
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  5. Alan Johnston Aurelio Bruno (2010). Contrast Gain Shapes Visual Time. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 156.0
    Traditionally time perception has been considered the product of a central, generic, cognitive mechanism. However, evidence is emerging for a distributive system with modality-specific sensory components (Johnston et al. 2006; Morrone et al. 2005). Here we show that fast contrast adaptation, which can be observed in the retina, induces a change in apparent duration. The perceived duration of a sub-second interval containing a 50% luminance contrast drifting pattern is compressed when it follows a high (90%) as compared to (...)
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  6. [deleted]Ibolya Halász, Einat Levy-Gigi, Oguz Kelemen, György Benedek & Szabolcs Kéri (2013). Neuropsychological Functions and Visual Contrast Sensitivity in Schizophrenia: The Potential Impact of Comorbid Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 150.0
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  7. [deleted]Zaira Cattaneo, Alberto Pisoni, Costanza Papagno & Juha Silvanto (2011). Modulation of Visual Cortical Excitability by Working Memory: Effect of Luminance Contrast of Mental Imagery. Frontiers in Psychology 2:29.score: 132.0
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  8. P. Gouras (1985). Parallel Processing of Color-Contrast Detectors in the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons. 242.score: 126.0
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  9. [deleted]Clifford Colin & Maloney Ryan (2013). Orientation Anisotropies Early in Human Visual Cortex Depend on Contrast. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 120.0
  10. Jeffrey T. Andre (1996). Visual Functioning in Challenging Conditions: Effects of Alcohol Consumption, Luminance, Stimulus Motion, and Glare on Contrast Sensitivity. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 2 (3):250.score: 120.0
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  11. M. Boon & C. M. Suttle (2004). Estimating Chromatic Contrast Thresholds From the Transient Visual Evoked Potential. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 58-58.score: 120.0
     
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  12. Aurelio Bruno & Alan Johnston (2010). Contrast Gain Shapes Visual Time. Frontiers in Psychology 1.score: 120.0
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  13. [deleted]Rebecca Camilleri, Andrea Pavan, Filippo Ghin, Luca Battaglini & Gianluca Campana (2014). Improvement of Uncorrected Visual Acuity and Contrast Sensitivity with Perceptual Learning and Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation in Individuals with Mild Myopia. Frontiers in Psychology 5.score: 120.0
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  14. William N. Dember & John Chambers (1975). Maskability of Visual Targets Varying in Brightness Contrast. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 5 (1):51-52.score: 120.0
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  15. B. R. Figge & E. R. Wist (1996). Visual Acuity Based on Motion Contrast: The Effect of Luminance and Luminance Contrast Reduction on Binocular and Monocular Performance. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 122-122.score: 120.0
     
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  16. Maria Wilenius & Antti Revonsuo (2007). Timing of the Earliest ERP Correlate of Visual Awareness. Psychophysiology 44 (5):703-710.score: 90.0
  17. J. J. Gibson (1937). Adaptation, After-Effect, and Contrast in the Perception of Tilted Lines. II. Simultaneous Contrast and the Areal Restriction of the After-Effect. [REVIEW] Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (6):553.score: 90.0
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  18. J. J. Gibson & M. Radner (1937). Adaptation, After-Effect and Contrast in the Perception of Tilted Lines. I. Quantitative Studies. Journal of Experimental Psychology 20 (5):453.score: 90.0
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  19. Layne Kalbfleisch, Megan Teresa DeBettencourt, Rebecca Kopperman, Meredith Banasiak, Joshua M. Roberts & Maryam Halavi (2013). Environmental Influences on Neural Systems of Relational Complexity. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 90.0
    Constructivist learning theory contends that we construct knowledge by experience and that environmental context influences learning. To explore this principle, we examined the cognitive process relational complexity (RC), defined as the number of visual dimensions considered during problem solving on a matrix reasoning task and a well-documented measure of mature reasoning capacity. We sought to determine how the visual environment influences RC by examining the influence of color and visual contrast on RC in a neuroimaging task. To specify the (...)
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  20. Rolf Reber & Norbert Schwarz (2001). The Hot Fringes of Consciousness: Perceptual Fluency and Affect. Consciousness and Emotion 2 (2):223-231.score: 84.0
    High figure-ground contrast usually results in more positive evaluations of visual stimuli. This may either reflect that high figure-ground contrast per se is a desirable attribute or that this attribute facilitates fluent processing. In the latter case, the influence of high figure-ground contrast should be most pronounced under short exposure times, that is, under conditions where the facilitative influence on perceptual fluency is most pronounced. Supporting this hypothesis, ratings of the prettiness of visual stimuli increased with figure-ground (...)
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  21. A. Leonard Diamond (1955). Foveal Simultaneous Contrast as a Function of Inducing-Field Area. Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (2):144.score: 78.0
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  22. E. B. Greene (1932). Effect of Background on Visual Acuity of Circle Grids. Journal of Experimental Psychology 15 (5):585.score: 78.0
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  23. Julian Hochberg & Virginia Brooks (1958). Effects of Previously Associated Annoying Stimuli (Auditory) on Visual Recognition Thresholds. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (5):490.score: 78.0
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  24. Tadasu Oyama & Yun Hsia (1966). Compensatory Hue Shift in Simultaneous Color Contrast as a Function of Separation Between Inducing and Test Fields. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (3):405.score: 78.0
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  25. Siegfried J. Gerathewohl & William F. Taylor (1953). Effect of Intermittent Light on the Readability of Printed Matter Under Conditions of Decreasing Contrast. Journal of Experimental Psychology 46 (4):278.score: 78.0
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  26. W. F. Grether (1942). The Magnitude of Simultaneous Color Contrast and Simultaneous Brightness Contrast for Chimpanzee and Man. Journal of Experimental Psychology 30 (1):69.score: 78.0
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  27. Allen Parducci, Daniel S. Perrett & Herbert W. Marsh (1969). Assimilation and Contrast as Range-Frequency Effects of Anchors. Journal of Experimental Psychology 81 (2):281.score: 78.0
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  28. Daniel J. Weintraub (1964). Successive Contrast Involving Luminance and Purity Alterations of the Ganzfeld. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (6):555.score: 78.0
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  29. W. H. Mikesell & M. Bentley (1930). Configuration and Brightness Contrast. Journal of Experimental Psychology 13 (1):1.score: 78.0
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  30. E. Rae Harcum (1967). Visual Detection and Recognition of Targets with Various Dependency Contrasts in Microstructure. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (1):155.score: 70.0
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  31. Kaoru Noguchi (2003). The Relationship Between Visual Illusion and Aesthetic Preference – an Attempt to Unify Experimental Phenomenology and Empirical Aesthetics. Axiomathes 13 (3-4):261-281.score: 66.0
    Experimental phenomenology has demonstrated that perception is much richer than stimulus. As is seen in color perception, one and the same stimulus provides more than several modes of appearance or perceptual dimensions. Similarly, there are various perceptual dimensions in form perception. Even a simple geometrical figure inducing visual illusion gives not only perceptual impressions of size, shape, slant, depth, and orientation, but also affective or aesthetic impressions. The present study reviews our experimental phenomenological work on visual illusion and experimental aesthetics, (...)
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  32. Scott P. Johnson (2010). How Infants Learn About the Visual World. Cognitive Science 34 (7):1158-1184.score: 66.0
    The visual world of adults consists of objects at various distances, partly occluding one another, substantial and stable across space and time. The visual world of young infants, in contrast, is often fragmented and unstable, consisting not of coherent objects but rather surfaces that move in unpredictable ways. Evidence from computational modeling and from experiments with human infants highlights three kinds of learning that contribute to infants’ knowledge of the visual world: learning via association, learning via active assembly, and (...)
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  33. Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Haluk Ogmen, Jose Ramon & Jian Chen (2005). Unconscious and Conscious Priming by Forms and Their Parts. Visual Cognition 12 (5):720-736.score: 66.0
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  34. Brian R. Gaines (2009). Designing Visual Languages for Description Logics. Journal of Logic, Language and Information 18 (2):217-250.score: 66.0
    Semantic networks were developed in cognitive science and artificial intelligence studies as graphical knowledge representation and inference tools emulating human thought processes. Formal analysis of the representation and inference capabilities of the networks modeled them as subsets of standard first-order logic (FOL), restricted in the operations allowed in order to ensure the tractability that seemed to characterize human reasoning capabilities. The graphical network representations were modeled as providing a visual language for the logic. Sub-sets of FOL targeted on knowledge representation (...)
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  35. Benjamin Balas (2012). Contrast Negation and Texture Synthesis Differentially Disrupt Natural Texture Appearance. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    Natural textures have characteristic image statistics that make them discriminable from unnatural textures. For example, both contrast-negation and texture synthesis alter the appearance of natural textures even though each manipulation preserves some features while disrupting others. Here, we examined the extent to which contrast-negation and texture synthesis each introduce or remove critical perceptual features for discriminating unnatural textures from natural textures. We find that both manipulations remove information that observers use for distinguishing natural textures from transformed versions of (...)
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  36. [deleted]Andreas Kotowicz, Ueli Rutishauser & Christof Koch (2010). Time Course of Target Recognition in Visual Search. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 66.0
    Visual search is a ubiquitous task of great importance: it allows us to quickly find the objects that we are looking for. During active search for an object (target), eye movements are made to different parts of the scene. Fixation locations are chosen based on a combination of information about the target and the visual input. At the end of a successful search, the eyes typically fixate on the target. But does this imply that target identification occurs while looking at (...)
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  37. Nathan A. Parks, Diane M. Beck & Arthur F. Kramer (2013). Enhancement and Suppression in the Visual Field Under Perceptual Load. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 66.0
    The perceptual load theory of attention proposes that the degree to which visual distractors are processed is a function of the attentional demands of a task – greater demands increase filtering of irrelevant distractors. The spatial configuration of such filtering is unknown. Here, we used steady-state visual evoked potentials (SSVEPs) in conjunction with time-domain event-related potentials (ERPs) to investigate the distribution of load-induced distractor suppression and task-relevant enhancement in the visual field. Electroencephalogram (EEG) was recorded while subjects performed a foveal (...)
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  38. [deleted]M. Rabovsky, W. Sommer & R. Rahman (2011). The Time Course of Semantic Richness Effects in Visual Word Recognition. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:11-11.score: 66.0
    The richness of semantic representations associated with individual words has emerged as an important variable in reading. In the present study we contrasted different measures of semantic richness and explored the time course of their influences during visual word processing as reflected in event-related brain potentials (ERPs). ERPs were recorded while participants performed a lexical decision task on visually presented words and pseudowords. For word stimuli, we orthogonally manipulated two frequently employed measures of semantic richness: The number of semantic features (...)
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  39. [deleted]Catherine Tallon-Baudry Valentin Wyart, Stanislas Dehaene (2012). Early Dissociation Between Neural Signatures of Endogenous Spatial Attention and Perceptual Awareness During Visual Masking. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    The relationship between spatial attention and conscious access has often been pictured as a single causal link: spatial attention would provide conscious access to weak stimuli by increasing their effective contrast during early visual processing. To test this hypothesis, we assessed whether the early attentional amplification of visual responses, around 100 ms following stimulus onset, had a decisive impact on conscious detection. We recorded magnetoencephalographic (MEG) signals while participants focused their attention toward or away from masked stimuli which were (...)
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  40. Catherine Craver-Lemley Adam Reeves (2012). Unmasking the Perky Effect: Spatial Extent of Image Interference on Visual Acuity. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    We have previously argued that visual mental images are not substitutable for visual percepts, because the interfering effects of visual stimuli such as line maskers on visual targets differ markedly in their properties from the interfering effects of visual images (the ‘Perky effect’). Imagery interference occurs over a much wider temporal and spatial extent than masking, and unlike masking, image interference is insensitive to relative orientation. The lack of substitutability is theoretically interesting because the Perky effect can be compared meaningfully (...)
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  41. Anna Schubö Agnieszka Wykowska, Bernhard Hommel (2012). Imaging When Acting: Picture but Not Word Cues Induce Action-Related Biases of Visual Attention. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    In line with the Theory of Event Coding (Hommel et al., 2001), action planning has been shown to affect perceptual processing—an effect that has been attributed to a so-called intentional weighting mechanism (Memelink & Hommel, in press; Wykowska, Schubö, & Hommel, 2009), whose functional role is to provide information for open parameters of online action adjustment (Hommel, 2010). The aim of this study was to test whether different types of action representations induce intentional weighting to various degrees. To meet this (...)
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  42. [deleted]Roy E. Crist, Chien-Te Wu, Chris Karp & Marty G. Woldorff (2007). Face Processing is Gated by Visual Spatial Attention. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:10.score: 66.0
    Human perception of faces is widely believed to rely on automatic processing by a domain-specifi c, modular component of the visual system. Scalp-recorded event-related potential (ERP) recordings indicate that faces receive special stimulus processing at around 170 ms poststimulus onset, in that faces evoke an enhanced occipital negative wave, known as the N170, relative to the activity elicited by other visual objects. As predicted by modular accounts of face processing, this early face-specifi c N170 enhancement has been reported to be (...)
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  43. [deleted]Julia Fellrath, Vanessa Blanche-Durbec, Armin Schnider, Anne-Sophie Jacquemoud & Radek Ptak (2012). Visual Search in Spatial Neglect Studied with a Preview Paradigm. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:93-93.score: 66.0
    Impaired visual search is a hallmark of spatial neglect. When searching for a unique feature (e.g., colour) neglect patients often show only slight visual field asymmetries. In contrast, when the target is defined by a combination of features (e.g., colour and form) they exhibit a severe deficit of contralesional search. This finding suggests a selective impairment of the serial deployment of spatial attention. Here, we examined this deficit with a preview paradigm. Neglect patients searched for a target defined by (...)
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  44. [deleted]Stephen D. Mayhew & Zoe Kourtzi (2013). Dissociable Circuits for Visual Shape Learning in the Young and Aging Human Brain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    Recognizing objects in cluttered scenes is vital for successful interactions in our complex environments. Learning is known to play a key role in facilitating performance in a wide range of perceptual skills not only in young but also older adults. However, the neural mechanisms that support our ability to improve visual form recognition with training in older age remain largely unknown. Here, we combine behavioral and fMRI measurements to identify the brain circuits involved in the learning of global visual forms (...)
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  45. Yang Xu, Christopher D'Lauro, John A. Pyles, Robert E. Kass & Michael J. Tarr (2013). Fine-Grained Temporal Coding of Visually-Similar Categories in the Ventral Visual Pathway and Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 66.0
    Humans are remarkably proficient at categorizing visually-similar objects. To better understand the cortical basis of this categorization process, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record neural activity while participants learned--with feedback--to discriminate two highly-similar, novel visual categories. We hypothesized that although prefrontal regions would mediate early category learning, this role would diminish with increasing category familiarity and that regions within the ventral visual pathway would come to play a more prominent role in encoding category-relevant information as learning progressed. Early in learning (...)
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  46. [deleted]Tatjana Aue, Marie-Eve Hoeppli, Camille Piguet, Virginie Sterpenich & Patrik Vuilleumier (2013). Visual Avoidance in Phobia: Particularities in Neural Activity, Autonomic Responding, and Cognitive Risk Evaluations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    We investigated the neural mechanisms and the autonomic and cognitive responses associated with visual avoidance behavior in spider phobia. Spider phobic and control participants imagined visiting different forest locations with the possibility of encountering spiders, snakes, or birds (neutral reference category). In each experimental trial, participants saw a picture of a forest location followed by a picture of a spider, snake, or bird, and then rated their personal risk of encountering these animals in this context, as well as their fear. (...)
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  47. [deleted]K. D. Singh J. B. Swettenham, S. D. Muthukumaraswamy (2013). BOLD Responses in Human Primary Visual Cortex Are Insensitive to Substantial Changes in Neural Activity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    The relationship between BOLD-fMRI (blood oxygenation level dependent-functional magnetic resonance imaging) and magnetoencephalography (MEG) metrics were explored using low-level visual stimuli known to elicit a rich variety of neural responses. Stimuli were either perceptually isoluminant red/green or luminance-modulated black/yellow square-wave gratings with spatial frequencies of 0.5, 3 and 6 cycles per degree. Neural responses were measured with BOLD-fMRI (3-tesla) and whole head MEG. For all stimuli, the BOLD response showed bilateral activation of early visual cortex that was greater in the (...)
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  48. Iain D. Gilchrist Peter J. Etchells, Christopher P. Benton, Casimir J. H. Ludwig (2011). Testing a Simplified Method for Measuring Velocity Integration in Saccades Using a Manipulation of Target Contrast. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 66.0
    A growing number of studies in vision research employ analyses of how perturbations in visual stimuli influence behaviour on single trials. Recently, we have developed a method along such lines to assess the time course over which object velocity information is extracted on a trial-by-trial basis in order to produce an accurate intercepting saccade to a moving target. Here, we present a simplified version of this methodology, and use it to investigate how changes in stimulus contrast affect the temporal (...)
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  49. [deleted]A. Rokem, J. H. Yoon, R. E. Ooms, R. J. Maddock, M. J. Minzenberg & M. A. Silver (2010). Broader Visual Orientation Tuning in Patients with Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:127-127.score: 66.0
    Reduced gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels in cerebral cortex are thought to contribute to information processing deficits in patients with schizophrenia (SZ), and we have previously reported lower in vivo GABA levels in the visual cortex of patients with SZ. GABA-mediated inhibition plays a role in sharpening orientation tuning of visual cortical neurons. Therefore, we predicted that tuning for visual stimulus orientation would be wider in SZ. We measured orientation tuning with a psychophysical procedure in which subjects performed a target detection (...)
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  50. M. S. Tibber, E. J. Anderson, T. Bobin, E. Antonova, A. Seabright, B. Wright, P. Carlin, S. S. Shergill & S. C. Dakin (2012). Visual Surround Suppression in Schizophrenia. Frontiers in Psychology 4:88-88.score: 66.0
    Compared to unaffected observers patients with schizophrenia show characteristic differences in visual perception, including a reduced susceptibility to the influence of context on judgements of contrast - a manifestation of weaker surround suppression. To examine the generality of this phenomenon we measured the ability of 24 individuals with schizophrenia to judge the luminance, contrast, orientation and size of targets embedded in contextual surrounds that would typically influence the target’s appearance. Individuals with schizophrenia demonstrated weaker surround suppression compared to (...)
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