Search results for '*Visual Cortex' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Order:
  1.  4
    Rufin Vogels (2010). Mechanisms of Visual Perceptual Learning in Macaque Visual Cortex. Topics in Cognitive Science 2 (2):239-250.
    The neural mechanisms underlying behavioral improvement in the detection or discrimination of visual stimuli following learning are still ill understood. Studies in nonhuman primates have shown relatively small and, across studies, variable effects of fine discrimination learning in primary visual cortex when tested outside the context of the learned task. At later stages, such as extrastriate area V4, extensive practice in fine discrimination produces more consistent effects upon responses and neural tuning. In V1 and V4, the effects of learning (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  85
    Frank Tong (2003). Primary Visual Cortex and Visual Awareness. Nature Reviews Neuroscience 4 (3):219-229.
  3.  24
    Victor A. F. Lamme, H. Landman Super, P. R. R. Roelfsema & H. Spekreijse (2000). The Role of Primary Visual Cortex (V1) in Visual Awareness. Vision Research 40 (10):1507-21.
  4.  6
    Gijs J. Brouwer, Raymond van Ee & Jens Schwarzbach (2005). Activation in Visual Cortex Correlates with the Awareness of Stereoscopic Depth. Journal of Neuroscience 25 (45):10403-10413.
  5.  16
    Tony Ro, Bruno Breitmeyer, Philip Burton, Neel S. Singhal & David Lane (2003). Feedback Contributions to Visual Awareness in Human Occipital Cortex. Current Biology 13 (12):1038-1041.
  6.  13
    Mika Koivisto, Henry Railo & Niina Salminen-Vaparanta (2011). Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Early Visual Cortex Interferes with Subjective Visual Awareness and Objective Forced-Choice Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):288-298.
    In order to study whether there exist a period of activity in the human early visual cortex that contributes exclusively to visual awareness, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation over the early visual cortex and measured subjective visual awareness during visual forced-choice symbol or orientation discrimination tasks. TMS produced one dip in awareness 60–120 ms after stimulus onset, while forced-choice orientation discrimination was suppressed between 60 and 90 ms and symbol discrimination between 60 and 120 ms. Thus, a time (...)
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  7.  9
    Josef Pfeuffer, High-Resolution 1H Chemical Shift Imaging in the Monkey Visual Cortex.
    Functionally distinct anatomic subdivisions of the brain can often be only a few millimeters in one or more dimensions. The study of metabolic differences in such structures by means of localized in vivo MR spectroscopy is therefore challenging, if not impossible. In fact, the spatial resolution of chemical shift imaging (CSI) in humans is typically in the range of centimeters. The aim of the present study was to optimize 1H CSI in monkeys and demonstrate the feasibility of high spatial resolutions (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  7
    Michael C. Schmid & Mark A. Augath, Visually Driven Activation in Macaque Areas V2 and V3 Without Input From the Primary Visual Cortex.
    Creating focal lesions in primary visual cortex (V1) provides an opportunity to study the role of extra-geniculo-striate pathways for activating extrastriate visual cortex. Previous studies have shown that more than 95% of neurons in macaque area V2 and V3 stop firing after reversibly cooling V1 [1,2,3]. However, no studies on long term recovery in areas V2, V3 following permanent V1 lesions have been reported in the macaque. Here we use macaque fMRI to study area V2, V3 activity patterns (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  7
    Zhicheng Lin (2008). Unconscious Inference and Conscious Representation: Why Primary Visual Cortex (V1) is Directly Involved in Visual Awareness. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):209-210.
    The extent to which visual processing can proceed in the visual hierarchy without awareness determines the magnitude of perceptual delay. Increasing data demonstrate that primary visual cortex (V1) is involved in consciousness, constraining the magnitude of visual delay. This makes it possible that visual delay is actually within the optimal lengths to allow sufficient computation; thus it might be unnecessary to compensate for visual delay.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10.  5
    Tobias Bonhoeffer Frank Sengpiel, C. B. Freeman Tobe & Colin Blakemore (2001). On the Relationship Between Interocular Suppression in the Primary Visual Cortex and Binocular Rivalry. Brain and Mind 2 (1).
    Both classical psychophysical work and recentfunctional imaging studies have suggested acritical role for the primary visual cortex(V1) in resolving the perceptual ambiguitiesexperienced during binocular rivalry. Here weexamine, by means of single-cell recordings andoptical imaging of intrinsic signals, thespatial characteristics of suppression elicitedby rival stimuli in cat V1. We find that the interocular suppression field of V1 neuronsis centred on the same position in space and isslightly larger (by a factor of 1.3) than theminimum response field, measured through thesame eye. (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11.  6
    Frank Sengpiel, Tobias Bonhoeffer, Tobe C. B. Freeman & Colin Blakemore (2001). On the Relationship Between Interocular Suppression in the Primary Visual Cortex and Binocular Rivalry. Brain and Mind 2 (1):39-54.
    Both classical psychophysical work and recentfunctional imaging studies have suggested acritical role for the primary visual cortex(V1) in resolving the perceptual ambiguitiesexperienced during binocular rivalry. Here weexamine, by means of single-cell recordings andoptical imaging of intrinsic signals, thespatial characteristics of suppression elicitedby rival stimuli in cat V1. We find that the interocular suppression field of V1 neuronsis centred on the same position in space and isslightly larger (by a factor of 1.3) than theminimum response field, measured through thesame eye. (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. A. B. Bonds & E. J. DeBruyn (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 292.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Leon N. Cooper (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 164.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. J. G. Daugman (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 96.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. V. Dobson & D. Rose (1985). Application of an Explicit Procedure for Model Building in the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 546--560.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Yves Fregnac (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 172.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. M. A. Georgeson (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 223.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. V. D. Glezer (1985). Spatial and Spatial Frequency Characteristics of Receptive Fields of the Visual Cortex and Piecewise Fourier Analysis. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 265--272.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. P. Gouras (1985). Parallel Processing of Color-Contrast Detectors in the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 242.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. P. Hammond (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 326.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. G. Hartmann (1985). Hierarchical Contour Coding by the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 137--145.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. Shaul Hochstein & Hedva Spitzer (1985). One, Few, Infinity: Linear and Nonlinear Processing in the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 341--350.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Christof Koch & Tomaso Poggio (1985). The Synaptic Veto Mechanism: Does It Underlie Direction and Orientation Selectivity in the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 408--419.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Lamberto Maffei (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 334.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Dan E. Nielsen (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 374.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. A. Peters (1985). Neuronal Composition and Circuitry of Rat Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 492--503.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Adam Murdin Sillito (1985). Inhibitory Circuits and Orientation Selectivity in the Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. W. Singer (1985). Activity-Dependent Self-Organization of the Mammalian Visual Cortex. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 123--136.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. N. V. Swindale (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons 452.
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Suzannah Bliss Tieman & Helmut Vb Hirsch (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex Edited by D. Rose and VG Dobson© 1985 John Wiley & Sons Ltd. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons
    No categories
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Keisuke Toyama (1985). Neuronal Circuitry in the Cat Visual Cortex Studied by Cross-Correlation Analysis. In David Rose & Vernon Dobson (eds.), Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. K. G. Thompson & Jeffrey D. Schall (2000). Antecedents and Correlates of Visual Detectoin and Awareness in Macaque Prefrontal Cortex. Vision Research 40 (10):1523-38.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33.  28
    Geraint Rees, E. Wojciulik, Karen Clarke, Masud Husain, Christopher D. Frith & Julia Driver (2000). Unconscious Activation of Visual Cortex in the Damaged Right Hemisphere of a Parietal Patient with Extinction. Brain 123 (8):1624-1633.
  34.  28
    Francis Crick & Christof Koch (1995). Are We Aware of Neural Activity in Primary Visual Cortex? Nature 375:121-23.
  35.  15
    Petra Stoerig & E. Barth (2001). Low-Level Phenomenal Vision Despite Unilateral Destruction of Primary Visual Cortex. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (4):574-587.
    GY, an extensively studied human hemianope, is aware of salient visual events in his cortically blind field but does not call this ''vision.'' To learn whether he has low-level conscious visual sensations or whether instead he has gained conscious knowledge about, or access to, visual information that does not produce a conscious phenomenal sensation, we attempted to image process a stimulus s presented to the impaired field so that when the transformed stimulus T(s) was presented to the normal hemifield it (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  36.  8
    Stephen Grossberg (2003). Linking Visual Cortex to Visual Perception: An Alternative to the Gestalt Bubble. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (4):412-413.
    Lehar's lively discussion builds on a critique of neural models of vision that is incorrect in its general and specific claims. He espouses a Gestalt perceptual approach rather than one consistent with the “objective neurophysiological state of the visual system” (target article, Abstract). Contemporary vision models realize his perceptual goals and also quantitatively explain neurophysiological and anatomical data.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37.  7
    Luiz Carlos L. Silveira (2004). Parallel Visual Pathways From the Retina to the Visual Cortex – How Do They Fit? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):50-51.
    Which roles are played by subcortical pathways in models of cortical streams for visual processing? Through their thalamic relays, magnocellular (M) and parvocellular (P) projecting ganglion cells send complementary signals to V1, where their outputs are combined in several different ways. The synergic role of M and P cells in vision can be understood by estimating cell response entropy in all domains of interest.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Charles M. Gray, P. Kreiter Konig, Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (1992). Oscillatory Responses in Cat Visual Cortex Exhibit Inter-Columnar Synchronization Which Reflects Global Stimulus Properties. Nature 338:334-7.
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   21 citations  
  39. John-Dylan Haynes & Geraint Rees (2005). Predicting the Stream of Consciousness From Activity in Human Visual Cortex. Current Biology 15 (14):1301-7.
  40.  61
    David A. Leopold & Nikos K. Logothetis (1996). Activity Changes in Early Visual Cortex Reflect Monkeys' Percepts During Binocular Rivalry. Nature 379 (6565):549-553.
  41.  63
    Pascal Fries, Pieter R. Roelfsema, Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (1997). Synchronization of Oscillatory Responses in Visual Cortex Correlates with Perception in Interocular Rivalry. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 94:12699-12704.
  42.  0
    Suzanne Dikker, Hugh Rabagliati & Liina Pylkkänen (2009). Sensitivity to Syntax in Visual Cortex. Cognition 110 (3):293-321.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  43. David Rose & G. Dobson, Vernon (eds.) (1985). Models of the Visual Cortex. New York: John Wiley & Sons.
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  44.  11
    Stephen Luck, Leonardo Chelazzi, Steven Hillyard & Robert Desimone (1997). Neural Mechanisms of Spatial Selective Attention in Areas V1, V2, and V4 of Macaque Visual Cortex. Journal of Neurophysiology 77 (1):24-42.
  45.  8
    Han Lee & Gregory V. Simpson (2005). Phase Locking of Single Neuron Activity to Theta Oscillations During Working Memory in Monkey Extrastriate Visual Cortex. Neuron 45:147-156.
    activity” has been considered to play a major role in the short-term maintenance of memories. Many studies since then have provided support for this view and greatly advanced our knowledge of the effects of stimulus type and modality on delay activity and its temporal dynamics (Funahashi et al., 1993; Fuster et al., 2000; Romo et al., 1999). In humans, working memory has also been a subject of intense investigation using scalp and intracranial electroencephalography (EEG, iEEG) as well as magnetoencephalography (MEG), (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  46.  0
    Liina Pylkkänen Suzanne Dikker, Hugh Rabagliati (2009). Sensitivity to Syntax in Visual Cortex. Cognition 110 (3):293.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  47.  16
    A. M. Sillito, H. E. Jones, G. L. Gerstein & D. C. West (1994). Feature-Linked Synchronization of Thalamic Relay Cell Firing Induced by Feedback From the Visual Cortex. Nature 369:479-82.
  48.  2
    Zhaoping Li (2002). A Saliency Map in Primary Visual Cortex. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 6 (1):9-16.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  49.  9
    Andreas K. Engel, P. Kreiter Konig & Schillen A. K. (1992). Temporal Coding in the Visual Cortex: New Vistas on Integration in the Nervous System. Trends in Neurosciences 15:218-26.
  50.  37
    P. Kreiter Konig, Andreas K. Engel & Wolf Singer (1995). Relation Between Oscillatory Activity and Long-Range Synchronization in Cat Visual Cortex. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Usa 92:290-94.
1 — 50 / 1000