Search results for '*Visual Displays' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  26
    Harvey S. Smallman & Maia B. Cook (2011). Naïve Realism: Folk Fallacies in the Design and Use of Visual Displays. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):579-608.
    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider trend (...)
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  2.  3
    Vincent Di Lollo, D. G. Lowe & J. P. Scott (1974). Backward Masking and Interference with the Processing of Brief Visual Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):934.
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  3.  2
    Charles W. Eriksen & John Rohrbaugh (1970). Visual Masking in Multielement Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):147.
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  4.  1
    Gilbert K. Krulee & Alexander Weisz (1955). Studies in the Visual Discrimination of Multiple-Unit Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (5):316.
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  5.  9
    Mary Hegarty, Harvey S. Smallman & Andrew T. Stull (2008). Decoupling of Intuitions and Performance in the Use of Complex Visual Displays. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society 881--886.
  6.  7
    Glyn Elwyn, Adrian Edwards, Michel Wensing, Richard Hibbs, Clare Wilkinson & Richard Grol (2001). Shared Decision Making Observed in Clinical Practice: Visual Displays of Communication Sequence and Patterns. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (2):211-221.
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  7.  4
    Göran Sonesson (1994). Prolegomena to the Semiotic Analysis of Prehistoric Visual Displays. Semiotica 100 (2-4):267-332.
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  8.  1
    Magda L. Dumitru (2015). Coherence Across Consciousness Levels: Symmetric Visual Displays Spare Working Memory Resources. Consciousness and Cognition 38:139-149.
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  9.  1
    Ronald A. Finke (1979). Nonrandom Curvature Adaptation to Random Visual Displays. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):68.
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  10. Jooyoung Jang & Christian D. Schunn (2014). A Framework for Unpacking Cognitive Benefits of Distributed Complex Visual Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 20 (3):260-269.
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  11. Joseph S. Lappin (1967). Attention in the Identification of Stimuli in Complex Visual Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (3):321.
  12.  38
    Ronald A. Rensink, The Management of Visual Attention in Graphic Displays.
    This chapter presents an overview of several recent developments in vision science, and outlines some of their implications for the management of visual attention in graphic displays. These include ways of sending attention to the right item at the right time, techniques to improve attentional efficiency, and possibilities for offloading some of the processing typically done by attention onto nonattentional mechanisms. In addition it is argued that such techniques not only allow more effective use to be made of visual (...)
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  13.  2
    Christopher D. Wickens & Jeffry Long (1995). Object Versus Space-Based Models of Visual Attention: Implications for the Design of Head-Up Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 1 (3):179.
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  14. M. P. Eckstein, J. P. Thomas & J. S. Whiting (1996). Predicting Visual Search Accuracy in Symbolic Displays and Medical Images. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview 5-5.
     
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  15. F. Jacob Seagull & Daniel Gopher (1997). Training Head Movement in Visual Scanning: An Embedded Approach to the Development of Piloting Skills with Helmet-Mounted Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 3 (3):163-180.
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  16. Yusuke Yamani & Jason S. McCarley (2010). Visual Search Asymmetries Within Color-Coded and Intensity-Coded Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 16 (2):124-132.
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  17.  19
    D. Alexander Varakin, Daniel T. Levin & Roger Fidler (2004). Unseen and Unaware: Implications of Recent Research on Failures of Visual Awareness for Human-Computer Interface Design. Human-Computer Interaction 19 (4):389-422.
  18.  4
    Benjamin W. White & Gayle E. Mueser (1960). Accuracy in Reconstructing the Arrangement of Elements Generating Kinetic Depth Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (1):1.
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  19.  2
    Terry J. Spencer (1971). Encoding Time From Iconic Storage: A Single-Letter Visual Display. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):18.
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  20.  1
    Carlo Umilta, Nancy Frost & Ray Hyman (1972). Interhemispheric Effects on Choice Reaction Times to One-, Two-, and Three-Letter Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):198.
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  21.  6
    Moreno I. Coco, Frank Keller & George L. Malcolm (2015). Anticipation in Real‐World Scenes: The Role of Visual Context and Visual Memory. Cognitive Science 40 (4):n/a-n/a.
    The human sentence processor is able to make rapid predictions about upcoming linguistic input. For example, upon hearing the verb eat, anticipatory eye-movements are launched toward edible objects in a visual scene. However, the cognitive mechanisms that underlie anticipation remain to be elucidated in ecologically valid contexts. Previous research has, in fact, mainly used clip-art scenes and object arrays, raising the possibility that anticipatory eye-movements are limited to displays containing a small number of objects in a visually impoverished context. (...)
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  22.  40
    Brian Fisher, Tera Marie Green & Richard Arias-Hernández (2011). Visual Analytics as a Translational Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):609-625.
    Visual analytics is a new interdisciplinary field of study that calls for a more structured scientific approach to understanding the effects of interaction with complex graphical displays on human cognitive processes. Its primary goal is to support the design and evaluation of graphical information systems that better support cognitive processes in areas as diverse as scientific research and emergency management. The methodologies that make up this new field are as yet ill defined. This paper proposes a pathway for development (...)
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  23.  96
    R. Rensink (2000). Visual Search for Change: A Probe Into the Nature of Attentional Processing. Visual Cognition 7:345-376.
    A set of visual search experiments tested the proposal that focused attention is needed to detect change. Displays were arrays of rectangles, with the target being the item that continually changed its orientation or contrast polarity. Five aspects of performance were examined: linearity of response, processing time, capacity, selectivity, and memory trace. Detection of change was found to be a self-terminating process requiring a time that increased linearly with the number of items in the display. Capacity for orientation was (...)
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  24.  24
    Vassilis Sevdalis & Peter E. Keller (2010). Cues for Self-Recognition in Point-Light Displays of Actions Performed in Synchrony with Music. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):617-626.
    Self–other discrimination was investigated with point-light displays in which actions were presented with or without additional auditory information. Participants first executed different actions in time with music. In two subsequent experiments, they watched point-light displays of their own or another participant’s recorded actions, and were asked to identify the agent . Manipulations were applied to the visual information and to the auditory information . Results indicate that self-recognition was better than chance in all conditions and was highest when (...)
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  25.  4
    Terry J. Spencer & Richard Shuntich (1970). Evidence for an Interruption Theory of Backward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):198.
  26.  29
    David LaBerge, L. Auclair & E. Sieroff (2000). Preparatory Attention: Experiment and Theory. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):396-434.
    This study investigated attention to a spatial location using a new spatial preparation task. Participants responded to a target dot presented in the center of a display and ignored a distractor dot presented to the right or left of the center. In an attempt to vary the level of preparatory attention directed to the target, the distractor dot was presented prior to the onset time of the target and the relative frequency of distractor dots to target dots within a block (...)
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  27. Gilles Pourtois, Michael De Pretto, Claude-Alain Hauert & Patrik Vuilleumier (2006). Time Course of Brain Activity During Change Blindness and Change Awareness: Performance is Predicted by Neural Events Before Change Onset. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 18 (12):2108-2129.
     
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  28.  90
    Zenon W. Pylyshynb, Jacob Feldmanb & Brian J. Scholla (2001). What is a Visual Object? Evidence From Target Merging in Multiple Object Tracking. Cognition 80 (1-2):159-177.
    The notion that visual attention can operate over visual objects in addition to spatial locations has recently received much empirical support, but there has been relatively little empirical consideration of what can count as an `object' in the ®rst place. We have investi- gated this question in the context of the multiple object tracking paradigm, in which subjects must track a number of independently and unpredictably moving identical items in a ®eld of identical distractors. What types of feature clusters can (...)
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  29. Elizabeth S. Spelke & Marc D. Hauser, Visual Representation in the Wild: How Rhesus Monkeys.
    & Visual object representation was studied in free-ranging rhesus monkeys. To facilitate comparison with humans, and to provide a new tool for neurophysiologists, we used a looking time procedure originally developed for studies of human infants. Monkeys’ looking times were measured to displays with one or two distinct objects, separated or together, stationary or moving. Results indicate that rhesus monkeys..
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  30.  16
    Ronald Rensink, Internal Vs. External Information in Visual Perception.
    One of the more compelling beliefs about vision is that it is based on representations that are coherent and complete, with everything in the visual field described in great detail. However, changes made during a visual disturbance are found to be difficult to see, arguing against the idea that our brains contain a detailed, picture-like representation of the scene. Instead, it is argued here that a more dynamic, "just-in-time" representation is involved, one with deep similarities to the way that users (...)
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  31.  66
    Patrick Maynard (2007). Portraits as Displays. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):111 - 121.
    Cynthia Freeland’s investigation of four kinds of ‘fidelity’ in portraiture is cut across by more general philosophical concerns. One is about what might be called the expression of persons--the persons or ‘inner selves’ of portrait subjects and of portrait artist: whether either is possible across each of the four kinds of fidelity, and whether these two kinds of expression are in tension. More fundamental is the problem of telling how self-expression is at all possible in any of these forms. Finally, (...)
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  32. William A. Johnston, William C. Howell & Myron M. Zajkowski (1967). Regulation of Attention to Complex Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (3):481.
  33.  87
    Birgitta Dresp, Severine Durand & Stephen Grossberg (2002). Depth Perception From Pairs of Overlapping Cues in Pictorial Displays. Spatial Visions 15:255-276.
    The experiments reported herein probe the visual cortical mechanisms that control near–far percepts in response to two-dimensional stimuli. Figural contrast is found to be a principal factor for the emergence of percepts of near versus far in pictorial stimuli, especially when stimulus duration is brief. Pictorial factors such as interposition (Experiment 1) and partial occlusion Experiments 2 and 3) may cooperate, as generally predicted by cue combination models, or compete with contrast factors in the manner predicted by the FACADE model. (...)
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  34.  2
    Anina N. Rich & Jason B. Mattingley (2010). Out of Sight, Out of Mind: The Attentional Blink Can Eliminate Synaesthetic Colours. Cognition 114 (3):320-328.
    Mechanisms of selective attention exert a powerful influence on visual perception. We examined whether attentional selection is necessary for generation of the vivid colours experienced by individuals with grapheme-colour synaesthesia. Twelve synaesthetes and matched controls viewed rapid serial displays of nonsense characters within which were embedded an oriented grating (T1) and a letter-prime (T2), forming a modified attentional blink (AB) task. At the end of the stream a coloured probe appeared that was either congruent or incongruent with the synaesthetic (...)
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  35.  22
    Helen E. Ross (2001). Berkeley, Helmholtz, the Moon Illusion, and Two Visual Systems. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (1):116-117.
    Berkeley and Helmholtz proposed different indirect mechanisms for size perception: Berkeley, that size was conditioned to various cues, independently of perceived distance; Helmholtz, that it was unconsciously calculated from angular size and perceived distance. The geometrical approach cannot explain size-distance paradoxes (e.g., moon illusion). The dorsal/ventral solution is dubious for close displays and untestable for far displays.
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  36.  5
    Amy Needham, Robert L. Goldstone & Sarah E. Wiesen (2014). Learning Visual Units After Brief Experience in 10‐Month‐Old Infants. Cognitive Science 38 (7):1507-1519.
    How does perceptual learning take place early in life? Traditionally, researchers have focused on how infants make use of information within displays to organize it, but recently, increasing attention has been paid to the question of how infants perceive objects differently depending upon their recent interactions with the objects. This experiment investigates 10-month-old infants' use of brief prior experiences with objects to visually organize a display consisting of multiple geometrically shaped three-dimensional blocks created for this study. After a brief (...)
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  37.  8
    T. Bachmann (2003). Perceptual Acceleration of Objects in Stream: Evidence From Flash-Lag Displays. Consciousness and Cognition 12 (2):279-297.
    An object in continuous motion is perceived ahead of the briefly flashed object, although the two images are physically aligned , the phenomenon called flash-lag effect. Flash-lag effects have been found also with other continuously changing features such as color, pattern entropy, and brightness as well as with streamed pre- and post-target input without any change of the feature values of streaming items in feature space . We interpret all instances of the flash-lag as a consequence of a more fundamental (...)
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  38. James J. Gibson (1979). The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Houghton Mifflin.
    And in the end I came to believe that the whole theory of depth perception was false. I suggested a new theory in a book on what I called the visual world ...
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  39. D. Ihde (2000). Expanding Hermeneutics: Visualism in Science (Drew Christie). Continental Philosophy Review 33 (2):218-224.
    _Expanding Hermeneutics _examines the development of interpretation theory, emphasizing how science in practice involves and implicates interpretive processes. Ihde argues that the sciences have developed a sophisticated visual hermeneutics that produces evidence by means of imaging, visual displays, and visualizations. From this vantage point, Ihde demonstrates how interpretation is built into technologies and instruments.
     
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  40. Ronald A. Rensink, Kevin J. O'Regan & James J. Clark (2000). On Failures to Detect Changes in Scenes Across Brief Interruptions. Visual Cognition 7 (1-3):127-145.
    When brief blank fields are placed between alternating displays of an original and a modified scene, a striking failure of perception is induced: the changes become extremely difficult to notice, even when they are large, presented repeatedly, and the observer expects them to occur (Rensink, O'Regan, & Clark, 1997). To determine the mechanisms behind this induced "change blindness", four experiments examine its dependence on initial preview and on the nature of the interruptions used. Results support the proposal that representations (...)
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  41.  80
    Peter C.-H. Cheng (2011). Probably Good Diagrams for Learning: Representational Epistemic Recodification of Probability Theory. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):475-498.
    The representational epistemic approach to the design of visual displays and notation systems advocates encoding the fundamental conceptual structure of a knowledge domain directly in the structure of a representational system. It is claimed that representations so designed will benefit from greater semantic transparency, which enhances comprehension and ease of learning, and plastic generativity, which makes the meaningful manipulation of the representation easier and less error prone. Epistemic principles for encoding fundamental conceptual structures directly in representational schemes are described. (...)
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  42.  58
    J. Kevin O'Regan, H. Deubel, James J. Clark & R. Rensink (2000). Picture Changes During Blinks: Looking Without Seeing and Seeing Without Looking. Visual Cognition 7:191-211.
    Observers inspected normal, high quality color displays of everyday visual scenes while their eye movements were recorded. A large display change occurred each time an eye blink occurred. Display changes could either involve "Central Interest" or "Marginal Interest" locations, as determined from descriptions obtained from independent judges in a prior pilot experiment. Visual salience, as determined by luminance, color, and position of the Central and Marginal interest changes were equalized.
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  43.  18
    Alberto Gallace, Sophia Zeeden, Brigitte Röder & Charles Spence (2010). Lost in the Move? Secondary Task Performance Impairs Tactile Change Detection on the Body. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (1):215-229.
    Change blindness, the surprising inability of people to detect significant changes between consecutively-presented visual displays, has recently been shown to affect tactile perception as well. Visual change blindness has been observed during saccades and eye blinks, conditions under which people’s awareness of visual information is temporarily suppressed. In the present study, we demonstrate change blindness for suprathreshold tactile stimuli resulting from the execution of a secondary task requiring bodily movement. In Experiment 1, the ability of participants to detect changes (...)
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  44.  58
    Michael Lynch (1991). Science in the Age of Mechanical Reproduction: Moral and Epistemic Relations Between Diagrams and Photographs. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 6 (2):205-226.
    Sociologists, philosophers and historians of science are gradually recognizing the importance of visual representation. This is part of a more general movement away from a theory-centric view of science and towards an interest in practical aspects of observation and experimentation. Rather than treating science as a matter of demonstrating the logical connection between theoretical and empirical statements, an increasing number of investigations are examining how scientists compose and use diagrams, graphs, photographs, micrographs, maps, charts, and related visual displays. This (...)
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  45.  1
    Jette Viethen, Thomas Vessem, Martijn Goudbeek & Emiel Krahmer (2016). Color in Reference Production: The Role of Color Similarity and Color Codability. Cognitive Science 40 (5):n/a-n/a.
    It has often been observed that color is a highly preferred attribute for use in distinguishing descriptions, that is, referring expressions produced with the purpose of identifying an object within a visual scene. However, most of these observations were based on visual displays containing only colors that were maximally different in hue and for which the language of experimentation possessed basic color terms. The experiments described in this paper investigate whether speakers’ preference for color is reduced if the color (...)
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  46.  6
    Sailee Shikhare, Stefan Heim, Elise Klein, Stefan Huber & Klaus Willmes (2015). Processing of Numerical and Proportional Quantifiers. Cognitive Science 39 (7):1504-1536.
    Quantifier expressions like “many” and “at least” are part of a rich repository of words in language representing magnitude information. The role of numerical processing in comprehending quantifiers was studied in a semantic truth value judgment task, asking adults to quickly verify sentences about visual displays using numerical or proportional quantifiers. The visual displays were composed of systematically varied proportions of yellow and blue circles. The results demonstrated that numerical estimation and numerical reference information are fundamental in encoding (...)
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  47.  31
    Hans-Jörg Rheinberger (1994). Representation in Scientific Practice. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 25 (4):647-654.
    The essays in this book provide an excellent introduction to the means by which scientists convey their ideas. While diverse in their subject matter, the essays are unified in asserting that scientists compose and use particular representations in contextually organized and contextually sensitive ways, and that these representations - particularly visual displays such as graphs, diagrams, photographs, and drawings - depend for their meaning on the complex activities in which they are situated.The topics include sociological orientations to representational practice, (...)
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  48.  2
    Josef Wallmannsberger (2011). Quodlibet (ex nihilo). American Journal of Semiotics 26 (1/4):129 - 132.
    At the beginning there was an act of extraordinary generosity: when I first met Jeff at a legal semiotics conference in the early eighties, he approached me after my presentation of mostly half-baked ideas and wild conjectures, congratulating me on my visual displays, and enquiring if I should be interested in developing my work into a joint book project. In the portrait of the scholar as a young man or woman, this is the kind of turn of events I (...)
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  49.  7
    Fuminori Ono & Jun-Ichiro Kawahara (2005). The Effect of Unconscious Priming on Temporal Production☆. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):474-482.
    We examined the effects of unconscious priming on temporal-interval production. In Experiment 1, participants were instructed to keep visual displays on a screen for 2500 ms intervals. Half of the displays were repeated across blocks throughout the entire experiment, and the others were newly generated from trial to trial. The displays consisted of patterns so complex that the participants could not intentionally memorize them. The results showed that significantly more time elapsed for old displays than for (...)
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  50.  10
    Julia Voss & Sahotra Sarkar (2003). Depictions as Surrogates for Places: From Wallace's Biogeography to Koch's Dioramas. Philosophy and Geography 6 (1):59 – 81.
    Habitat dioramas depicting ecological relations between organisms and their natural environments have become the preferred mode of museum display in most natural history museums in North America and Europe. Dioramas emerged in the late nineteenth century as an alternative mode of museum installation from taxonomically arranged cases. We suggest that this change was closely connected to the emergence of a biogeographical framework rooted in evolutionary theory and positing the existence of distinct biogeographical zones. We tie the history of dioramas to (...)
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