Search results for '*Visual Displays' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Harvey S. Smallman & Maia B. Cook (2011). Naïve Realism: Folk Fallacies in the Design and Use of Visual Displays. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):579-608.score: 236.0
    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider trend (...)
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  2. Vincent Di Lollo, D. G. Lowe & J. P. Scott (1974). Backward Masking and Interference with the Processing of Brief Visual Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 103 (5):934.score: 210.0
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  3. Charles W. Eriksen & John Rohrbaugh (1970). Visual Masking in Multielement Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (1p1):147.score: 168.0
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  4. Gilbert K. Krulee & Alexander Weisz (1955). Studies in the Visual Discrimination of Multiple-Unit Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 50 (5):316.score: 168.0
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  5. F. Geringswald, F. Baumgartner & S. Pollmann (2011). Simulated Loss of Foveal Vision Eliminates Visual Search Advantage in Repeated Displays. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:134-134.score: 156.0
    In the contextual cueing paradigm, incidental visual learning of repeated distractor configurations leads to faster search times in repeated compared to new displays. This contextual cueing is closely linked to the visual exploration of the search arrays as indicated by fewer fixations and more efficient scan paths in repeated search arrays. Here, we examined contextual cueing under impaired visual exploration induced by a simulated central scotoma that causes the participant to rely on extrafoveal vision. We let normal-sighted participants search (...)
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  6. Glyn Elwyn, Adrian Edwards, Michel Wensing, Richard Hibbs, Clare Wilkinson & Richard Grol (2001). Shared Decision Making Observed in Clinical Practice: Visual Displays of Communication Sequence and Patterns. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 7 (2):211-221.score: 150.0
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  7. Göran Sonesson (1994). Prolegomena to the Semiotic Analysis of Prehistoric Visual Displays. Semiotica 100 (2-4):267-332.score: 150.0
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  8. Ronald A. Finke (1979). Nonrandom Curvature Adaptation to Random Visual Displays. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):68.score: 150.0
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  9. Mary Hegarty, Harvey S. Smallman & Andrew T. Stull (2008). Decoupling of Intuitions and Performance in the Use of Complex Visual Displays. In. In B. C. Love, K. McRae & V. M. Sloutsky (eds.), Proceedings of the 30th Annual Conference of the Cognitive Science Society. Cognitive Science Society. 881--886.score: 150.0
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  10. Joseph S. Lappin (1967). Attention in the Identification of Stimuli in Complex Visual Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 75 (3):321.score: 150.0
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  11. Ronald A. Rensink, The Management of Visual Attention in Graphic Displays.score: 144.0
    This chapter presents an overview of several recent developments in vision science, and outlines some of their implications for the management of visual attention in graphic displays. These include ways of sending attention to the right item at the right time, techniques to improve attentional efficiency, and possibilities for offloading some of the processing typically done by attention onto nonattentional mechanisms. In addition it is argued that such techniques not only allow more effective use to be made of visual (...)
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  12. Terry J. Spencer (1971). Encoding Time From Iconic Storage: A Single-Letter Visual Display. Journal of Experimental Psychology 91 (1):18.score: 130.0
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  13. Christopher D. Wickens & Jeffry Long (1995). Object Versus Space-Based Models of Visual Attention: Implications for the Design of Head-Up Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Applied 1 (3):179.score: 120.0
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  14. M. P. Eckstein, J. P. Thomas & J. S. Whiting (1996). Predicting Visual Search Accuracy in Symbolic Displays and Medical Images. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview. 5-5.score: 120.0
     
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  15. D. Alexander Varakin, Daniel T. Levin & Roger Fidler (2004). Unseen and Unaware: Implications of Recent Research on Failures of Visual Awareness for Human-Computer Interface Design. Human-Computer Interaction 19 (4):389-422.score: 90.0
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  16. Benjamin W. White & Gayle E. Mueser (1960). Accuracy in Reconstructing the Arrangement of Elements Generating Kinetic Depth Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 60 (1):1.score: 90.0
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  17. John L. Craft & J. Richard Simon (1970). Processing Symbolic Information From a Visual Display: Interference From an Irrelevant Directional Cue. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):415.score: 84.0
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  18. Lester E. Krueger (1970). Search Time in a Redundant Visual Display. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):391.score: 84.0
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  19. Charles W. Eriksen (1952). Location of Objects in a Visual Display as a Function of the Number of Dimensions on Which the Objects Differ. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (1):56.score: 84.0
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  20. Carlo Umilta, Nancy Frost & Ray Hyman (1972). Interhemispheric Effects on Choice Reaction Times to One-, Two-, and Three-Letter Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 93 (1):198.score: 78.0
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  21. Ira T. Kaplan & W. N. Schoenfeld (1966). Oculomotor Patterns During the Solution of Visually Displayed Anagrams. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (3):447.score: 70.0
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  22. Brian Fisher, Tera Marie Green & Richard Arias-Hernández (2011). Visual Analytics as a Translational Cognitive Science. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):609-625.score: 66.0
    Visual analytics is a new interdisciplinary field of study that calls for a more structured scientific approach to understanding the effects of interaction with complex graphical displays on human cognitive processes. Its primary goal is to support the design and evaluation of graphical information systems that better support cognitive processes in areas as diverse as scientific research and emergency management. The methodologies that make up this new field are as yet ill defined. This paper proposes a pathway for development (...)
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  23. Dagmar Müller, Andreas Widmann & Erich Schröger (2013). Object-Related Regularities Are Processed Automatically: Evidence From the Visual Mismatch Negativity. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 66.0
    One of the most challenging tasks of our visual systems is to structure and integrate the enormous amount of incoming information into distinct coherent objects. It is an ongoing debate whether or not the formation of visual objects requires attention. Implicit behavioural measures suggest that object formation can occur for task-irrelevant and unattended visual stimuli. The present study investigated pre-attentive visual object formation by combining implicit behavioural measures and an electrophysiological indicator of pre-attentive visual irregularity detection, the visual mismatch negativity (...)
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  24. Zachary Joseph Jackson Roper & Shaun P. Vecera (2013). Response Terminated Displays Unload Selective Attention. Frontiers in Psychology 4:967.score: 66.0
    Perceptual load theory successfully replaced the early versus late selection debate by appealing to adaptive control over the efficiency of selective attention. Early selection is observed unless perceptual load (p-Load) is sufficiently low to grant attentional ‘spill-over‘ to task-irrelevant stimuli. Many studies exploring load theory have used limited display durations that perhaps impose artificial limits on encoding processes. We extended the exposure duration in a classic p-Load task to alleviate temporal encoding demands that may otherwise tax mnemonic consolidation processes. If (...)
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  25. Filipp Schmidt Thomas Schmidt, Anke Haberkamp, G. Marina Veltkamp, Andreas Weber, Anna Seydell-Greenwald (2011). Visual Processing in Rapid-Chase Systems: Image Processing, Attention, and Awareness. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 66.0
    Visual stimuli can be classified so rapidly that their analysis may be based on a single sweep of feedforward processing through the visuomotor system. Behavioral criteria for feedforward processing can be evaluated in response priming tasks where speeded pointing or keypress responses are performed towards target stimuli which are preceded by prime stimuli. We apply this method to several classes of complex stimuli. 1) When participants classify natural images into animals or non-animals, the time course of their pointing responses indicates (...)
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  26. Thomas Geyer, Florian Johannes Baumgartner, Hermann Josef Mueller & Stefan Pollmann (2012). Medial Temporal Lobe-Dependent Repetition Suppression and Enhancement Due to Implicit Vs. Explicit Processing of Individual Repeated Search Displays. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 66.0
    Using visual search, functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and patient studies have demonstrated that medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures differentiate repeated from novel displays – even when observers are unaware of display repetitions. This suggests a role for MTL in both explicit and, importantly, implicit learning of repeated sensory information (Greene et al., 2007). However, recent behavioral studies suggest, by examining visual search and recognition performance concurrently, that observers have explicit knowledge of at least some of the repeated (...) (Geyer et al., 2010). The aim of the present fMRI study was thus to contribute new evidence regarding the contribution of MTL structures to explicit versus implicit learning in visual search. It was found that MTL activation was increased for explicit and, respectively, decreased for implicit relative to baseline displays. These activation differences were most pronounced in left anterior parahippocampal cortex, especially when observers were highly trained on the repeated displays. The data are taken to suggest that explicit and implicit memory processes are linked within MTL structures, but expressed via functionally separable mechanisms (repetition enhancement vs. -suppression). They further show that repetition effects in visual search would have to be investigated at the display level. (shrink)
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  27. David LaBerge, L. Auclair & E. Sieroff (2000). Preparatory Attention: Experiment and Theory. Consciousness and Cognition 9 (3):396-434.score: 62.0
    This study investigated attention to a spatial location using a new spatial preparation task. Participants responded to a target dot presented in the center of a display and ignored a distractor dot presented to the right or left of the center. In an attempt to vary the level of preparatory attention directed to the target, the distractor dot was presented prior to the onset time of the target and the relative frequency of distractor dots to target dots within a block (...)
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  28. Patrick Maynard (2007). Portraits as Displays. Philosophical Studies 135 (1):111 - 121.score: 60.0
    Cynthia Freeland’s investigation of four kinds of ‘fidelity’ in portraiture is cut across by more general philosophical concerns. One is about what might be called the expression of persons--the persons or ‘inner selves’ of portrait subjects and of portrait artist: whether either is possible across each of the four kinds of fidelity, and whether these two kinds of expression are in tension. More fundamental is the problem of telling how self-expression is at all possible in any of these forms. Finally, (...)
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  29. R. Rensink (2000). Visual Search for Change: A Probe Into the Nature of Attentional Processing. Visual Cognition 7:345-376.score: 60.0
    A set of visual search experiments tested the proposal that focused attention is needed to detect change. Displays were arrays of rectangles, with the target being the item that continually changed its orientation or contrast polarity. Five aspects of performance were examined: linearity of response, processing time, capacity, selectivity, and memory trace. Detection of change was found to be a self-terminating process requiring a time that increased linearly with the number of items in the display. Capacity for orientation was (...)
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  30. Terry J. Spencer & Richard Shuntich (1970). Evidence for an Interruption Theory of Backward Masking. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (2):198.score: 60.0
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  31. Carmel Mevorach, Yehoshua Tsal & Glyn Humphreys (2013). Low Level Perceptual, Not Attentional, Processes Modulate Distractor Interference in High Perceptual Load Displays: Evidence From Neglect/Extinction. Frontiers in Psychology 4:966.score: 60.0
    According to perceptual load theory (Lavie, 2005) distractor interference is determined by the availability of attentional resources. If target processing does not exhaust resources (with low perceptual load) distractor processing will take place resulting in interference with a primary task; however when target processing uses-up attentional capacity (with high perceptual load) interference can be avoided. An alternative account (Tsal & Benoni, 2010) suggests that perceptual load effects can be based on distractor dilution by the mere presence of additional neutral items (...)
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  32. Gilles Pourtois, Michael De Pretto, Claude-Alain Hauert & Patrik Vuilleumier (2006). Time Course of Brain Activity During Change Blindness and Change Awareness: Performance is Predicted by Neural Events Before Change Onset. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience 18 (12):2108-2129.score: 60.0
     
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  33. Lester E. Krueger (1970). Effect of Frequency of Display on Speed of Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):495.score: 58.0
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  34. Zenon W. Pylyshynb, Jacob Feldmanb & Brian J. Scholla (2001). What is a Visual Object? Evidence From Target Merging in Multiple Object Tracking. Cognition 80 (1-2):159-177.score: 54.0
    The notion that visual attention can operate over visual objects in addition to spatial locations has recently received much empirical support, but there has been relatively little empirical consideration of what can count as an `object' in the ®rst place. We have investi- gated this question in the context of the multiple object tracking paradigm, in which subjects must track a number of independently and unpredictably moving identical items in a ®eld of identical distractors. What types of feature clusters can (...)
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  35. Ronald Rensink, Internal Vs. External Information in Visual Perception.score: 54.0
    One of the more compelling beliefs about vision is that it is based on representations that are coherent and complete, with everything in the visual field described in great detail. However, changes made during a visual disturbance are found to be difficult to see, arguing against the idea that our brains contain a detailed, picture-like representation of the scene. Instead, it is argued here that a more dynamic, "just-in-time" representation is involved, one with deep similarities to the way that users (...)
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  36. Elizabeth S. Spelke & Marc D. Hauser, Visual Representation in the Wild: How Rhesus Monkeys.score: 54.0
    & Visual object representation was studied in free-ranging rhesus monkeys. To facilitate comparison with humans, and to provide a new tool for neurophysiologists, we used a looking time procedure originally developed for studies of human infants. Monkeys’ looking times were measured to displays with one or two distinct objects, separated or together, stationary or moving. Results indicate that rhesus monkeys..
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  37. Bert F. Green & Lois K. Anderson (1956). Color Coding in a Visual Search Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (1):19.score: 44.0
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  38. Amy Needham, Robert L. Goldstone & Sarah E. Wiesen (2014). Learning Visual Units After Brief Experience in 10‐Month‐Old Infants. Cognitive Science 38 (6).score: 42.0
    How does perceptual learning take place early in life? Traditionally, researchers have focused on how infants make use of information within displays to organize it, but recently, increasing attention has been paid to the question of how infants perceive objects differently depending upon their recent interactions with the objects. This experiment investigates 10-month-old infants' use of brief prior experiences with objects to visually organize a display consisting of multiple geometrically shaped three-dimensional blocks created for this study. After a brief (...)
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  39. William A. Johnston, William C. Howell & Myron M. Zajkowski (1967). Regulation of Attention to Complex Displays. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (3):481.score: 42.0
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  40. William M. Miley, Dorothy Wetzel & Jonathan Bonds (1980). Effect of Prior Visual Experience with a Paradise Fish (Macropodus Opercularis) or a Mirror Image on Strength of Aggressive Display in Siamese Fighting Fish (Betta Splendens) Toward a Conspecific, an Alien Species (Macropodus Opercularis), and a Mirror Image. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 16 (6):455-457.score: 40.0
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  41. Sidney L. Smith (1962). Color Coding and Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (5):434.score: 40.0
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  42. Thomas S. Wallsten & Robert M. Lambert (1981). Visual Braille and Print Reading as a Function of Display Field Size. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 17 (1):15-18.score: 40.0
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  43. Andreas Kotowicz, Ueli Rutishauser & Christof Koch (2010). Time Course of Target Recognition in Visual Search. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 38.0
    Visual search is a ubiquitous task of great importance: it allows us to quickly find the objects that we are looking for. During active search for an object (target), eye movements are made to different parts of the scene. Fixation locations are chosen based on a combination of information about the target and the visual input. At the end of a successful search, the eyes typically fixate on the target. But does this imply that target identification occurs while looking at (...)
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  44. Henning Schmidgen (2004). Pictures, Preparations, and Living Processes: The Production of Immediate Visual Perception (Anschauung) in Late-19th-Century Physiology. [REVIEW] Journal of the History of Biology 37 (3):477 - 513.score: 38.0
    This paper addresses the visual culture of late-19th-century experimental physiology. Taking the case of Johann Nepomuk Czermak (1828-1873) as a key example, it argues that images played a crucial role in acquiring experimental physiological skills. Czermak, Emil Du Bois-Reymond (1818-1896) and other late-19th-century physiologists sought to present the achievements and perspective of their discipline by way of "immediate visual perception (unmittelbare Anschauung)." However, the images they produced and presented for this purpose were strongly mediated. By means of specifically designed instruments, (...)
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  45. Roberto Alfonso Abreu-Mendoza, Elia Elena Soto-Alba & Natalia Arias-Trejo (2013). Area Vs. Density: Influence of Visual Variables and Cardinality Knowledge in Early Number Comparison. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 38.0
    Current research in the number development field has focused in individual differences regarding the acuity of children’s Approximate Number System. The most common task to evaluate children’s acuity is through non-symbolic numerical comparison. Efforts have been made to prevent children from using perceptual cues by controlling the visual properties of the stimuli (e.g. density, contour length and area); nevertheless, researchers have used these visual controls interchangeably. Studies have also tried to understand the relation between children’s cardinality knowledge and their performance (...)
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  46. Reinhold Kliegl, Ping Wei, Michael Dambacher, Ming Yan & Xiaolin Zhou (2010). Experimental Effects and Individual Differences in Linear Mixed Models: Estimating the Relationship Between Spatial, Object, and Attraction Effects in Visual Attention. Frontiers in Psychology 1:238-238.score: 38.0
    Linear mixed models (LMMs) provide a still underused methodological perspective on combining experimental and individual-differences research. Here we illustrate this approach with two-rectangle cueing in visual attention (Egly, Driver, & Rafal, 1994). We replicated previous experimental cue-validity effects relating to a spatial shift of attention within an object (spatial effect), to attention switch between objects (object effect), and to the attraction of attention towards the display centroid (attraction effect), taking also into account the design-inherent imbalance of valid and other trials. (...)
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  47. Markus Schroer (2014). Visual Culture and the Fight for Visibility. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2):206-228.score: 38.0
    The article explores the relationship between visual culture and the fight for visibility and attention in contemporary society. It draws on a concept of visual culture which not only sees the rising significance of the visual and the proliferation of images as its defining traits, but also the fact that, today, people are—to a much higher degree—both consumers as well as producers of images. Based on this definition, it is argued that in visually oriented communication and media societies, the anthropologically (...)
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  48. Helen Clery, Sylvie Roux, Emmanuelle Houy-Durand, Frédérique Bonnet-Brilhault, Nicole Bruneau & Marie Gomot (2013). Electrophysiological Evidence of Atypical Visual Change Detection in Adults with Autism. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 38.0
    Although atypical change detection processes have been highlighted in the auditory modality in Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD), little is known about these processes in the visual modality. The aim of the present study was therefore to investigate visual change detection in adults with ASD, taking into account the salience of change , in order to determine whether this ability is affected in this disorder. Thirteen adults with ASD and 13 controls were presented with a passive visual three stimuli oddball paradigm. (...)
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  49. Allison Yamanashi Leib, Ayelet N. Landau, Yihwa Baek, Sang C. Chong & Lynn Robertson (2012). Extracting the Mean Size Across the Visual Field in Patients with Mild, Chronic Unilateral Neglect. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6:267-267.score: 38.0
    Previous studies suggest that normal vision extracts statistical information from sets of objects across the visual field (e.g., mean size). In this study, we explore whether patients with left unilateral neglect extract statistical summaries in a typical manner. We tested 4 patients with left unilateral neglect using a visual search task that varied the mean size of a group of circles within the display. The task was to report whether a target circle was present or not. On each trial, we (...)
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  50. Tatjana Aue, Marie-Eve Hoeppli, Camille Piguet, Virginie Sterpenich & Patrik Vuilleumier (2013). Visual Avoidance in Phobia: Particularities in Neural Activity, Autonomic Responding, and Cognitive Risk Evaluations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 38.0
    We investigated the neural mechanisms and the autonomic and cognitive responses associated with visual avoidance behavior in spider phobia. Spider phobic and control participants imagined visiting different forest locations with the possibility of encountering spiders, snakes, or birds (neutral reference category). In each experimental trial, participants saw a picture of a forest location followed by a picture of a spider, snake, or bird, and then rated their personal risk of encountering these animals in this context, as well as their fear. (...)
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