Search results for '*Visual Feedback' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Waka Fujisaki (2012). Effects of Delayed Visual Feedback on Grooved Pegboard Test Performance. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 240.0
    Using four experiments, this study investigates what amount of delay brings about maximal impairment under delayed visual feedback and whether a critical interval, such as that in audition, also exists in vision. The first experiment measured the Grooved Pegboard test performance as a function of visual feedback delays from 120 to 2120 ms in 16 steps. Performance sharply decreased until about 490 ms, then more gradually until 2120 ms, suggesting that two mechanisms were operating under delayed visual (...). Since delayed visual feedback differs from delayed auditory feedback in that the former induces not only temporal but also spatial displacements between motor and sensory feedback, this difference could also exist in the mechanism responsible for spatial displacement. The second experiment was hence conducted to provide simultaneous haptic feedback together with delayed visual feedback to inform correct spatial position. The disruption was significantly ameliorated when information about spatial position was provided from a haptic source. The sharp decrease in performance of up to approximately 300 ms was followed by an almost flat performance. This is similar to the critical interval found in audition. Accordingly, the mechanism that caused the sharp decrease in performance in experiments 1 and 2 was probably mainly responsible for temporal disparity and is common across different modality–motor combinations, while the other mechanism that caused a rather gradual decrease in performance in experiment 1 was mainly responsible for spatial displacement. In experiments 3 and 4, the reliability of spatial information from the haptic source was reduced by wearing a glove or using a tool. When the reliability of spatial information was reduced, the data lay between those of experiments 1 and 2, and that a gradual decrease in performance partially reappeared. These results further support the notion that two mechanisms operate under delayed visual feedback. (shrink)
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  2. Livia Silveira Pogetti, Rosana Machado Souza, Eloísa Tudella & Luis Augusto Teixeira (2013). Early Infant's Use of Visual Feedback in Voluntary Reaching for a Spatial Target. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 240.0
    Capacity of using visual feedback by infants at the age of reaching onset has been controversial. In this investigation we assessed movement kinematics in the task of reaching for a toy in 5-month-olds, comparing movements performed with the preferred arm under full vision versus visual occlusion. That comparison was made in consecutive periods of visual occlusion. Analysis of results revealed that visual occlusion led to decreased straightness of arm displacement toward the toy as compared to full vision. Longer periods (...)
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  3. Ronald W. Angel, Harry Garland & Martin Fischler (1971). Tracking Errors Amended Without Visual Feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):422.score: 210.0
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  4. John D. Gould (1965). Differential Visual Feedback of Component Motions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (3):263.score: 210.0
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  5. Steven W. Keele & Michael I. Posner (1968). Processing of Visual Feedback in Rapid Movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):155.score: 210.0
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  6. John D. Gould & Amy Schaffer (1965). Partial Visual Feedback of Component Motions as a Function of Difficulty of Motor Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):564.score: 210.0
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  7. Richard Held, Aglaia Efstathiou & Martha Greene (1966). Adaptation to Displaced and Delayed Visual Feedback From the Hand. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):887.score: 198.0
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  8. Takuya Honda, Nobuhiro Hagura, Toshinori Yoshioka & Hiroshi Imamizu (2013). Imposed Visual Feedback Delay of an Action Changes Mass Perception Based on the Sensory Prediction Error. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 192.0
    While performing an action, the timing of when the sensory feedback is given can be used to establish the causal link between the action and its consequence. It has been shown that delaying the visual feedback while carrying an object makes people feel the mass of the object to be greater, suggesting that the feedback timing can also impact the perceived quality of an external object. In this study, we investigated the origin of the feedback timing (...)
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  9. Dawson Kidgell Timo Rantalainen, Ashleigh Weier, Michael Leung, Chris Brandner, Michael Spittle (2013). Short-Interval Intracortical Inhibition is Not Affected by Varying Visual Feedback in an Isometric Task in Biceps Brachii Muscle. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 180.0
    Short-interval intracortical inhibition (SICI) of the primary motor cortex (M1) appears to play a significant role in skill acquisition. Consequently, it is of interest to find out which factors cause modulation of SICI. Purpose: To establish if visual feedback and force requirements influence SICI. Methods: SICI was assessed from 10 healthy adults (5 males and 5 females aged between 21 and 35 years) in three submaximal isometric elbow flexion torque levels (5%, 20% and 40% of maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) (...)
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  10. John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback and Geometry of Visual Space: An Attempted Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):59-64.score: 168.0
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  11. Simon Clavagnier, Arnaud Falchier & Henry Kennedy (2004). Long-Distance Feedback Projections to Area V1: Implications for Multisensory Integration, Spatial Awareness, and Visual Consciousness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. Special Issue 4 (2):117-126.score: 168.0
  12. Gary M. Brosvic, Margaret Farrelly, Edward Rebele, Donna Ribardo, Jill Gutowski, Loreen Kafer & Roberta E. Dihoff (1993). Nonequivalent Roles for Motor and Visual Feedback in the Müller-Lyer and Horizontal-Vertical Illusions. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (1):42-44.score: 150.0
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  13. Eugene A. Lovelace, Beth A. Vella & Donna M. Anderson (1993). Judging Age From Handwriting Done with and Without Visual Feedback. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (2):111-113.score: 150.0
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  14. Lore Thaler & Melvyn A. Goodale (2011). Neural Substrates of Visual Spatial Coding and Visual Feedback Control for Hand Movements in Allocentric and Target-Directed Tasks. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:92.score: 150.0
  15. Steven Lehar, Computational Implications of Gestalt Theory: The Role of Feedback in Visual Processing.score: 144.0
    Neurophysiological investigations of the visual system by way of single-cell recordings have revealed a hierarchical architecture in which lower level areas, such as the primary visual cortex, contain cells that respond to simple features, while higher level areas contain cells that respond to higher order features apparently composed of combinations of lower level features. This architecture seems to suggest a feed-forward processing strategy in which visual information progresses from lower to higher visual areas. However there is other evidence, both neurophysiological (...)
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  16. Tony Ro, Bruno Breitmeyer, Philip Burton, Neel S. Singhal & David Lane (2003). Feedback Contributions to Visual Awareness in Human Occipital Cortex. Current Biology 13 (12):1038-1041.score: 132.0
  17. Thomas L. Bennett & Henry C. Ellis (1968). Tactual-Kinesthetic Feedback From Manipulation of Visual Forms and Nondifferential Reinforcement in Transfer of Perceptual Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):495.score: 132.0
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  18. Matthew F. Panichello, Olivia S. Cheung & Moshe Bar (2012). Predictive Feedback and Conscious Visual Experience. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 132.0
    The human brain continuously generates predictions about the environment based on learned regularities in the world. These predictions actively and efficiently facilitate the interpretation of incoming sensory information. We review evidence that, as a result of this facilitation, predictions directly influence conscious experience. Specifically, we propose that predictions enable rapid generation of conscious percepts and bias the contents of awareness in situations of uncertainty. The possible neural mechanisms underlying this facilitation are discussed.
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  19. Moshe Bar Matthew F. Panichello, Olivia S. Cheung (2012). Predictive Feedback and Conscious Visual Experience. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 132.0
    The human brain continuously generates predictions about the environment based on learned regularities in the world. These predictions actively and efficiently facilitate the interpretation of incoming sensory information. We review evidence that, as a result of this facilitation, predictions directly influence conscious experience. Specifically, we propose that predictions enable rapid generation of conscious percepts and bias the contents of awareness in situations of uncertainty. The possible neural mechanisms underlying this facilitation are discussed.
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  20. Lawrence Brancazio & Carol A. Fowler (2000). Merging Auditory and Visual Phonetic Information: A Critical Test for Feedback? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):327-328.score: 126.0
    The present description of the Merge model addresses only auditory, not audiovisual, speech perception. However, recent findings in the audiovisual domain are relevant to the model. We outline a test that we are conducting of the adequacy of Merge, modified to accept visual information about articulation.
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  21. A. M. Sillito, H. E. Jones, G. L. Gerstein & D. C. West (1994). Feature-Linked Synchronization of Thalamic Relay Cell Firing Induced by Feedback From the Visual Cortex. Nature 369:479-82.score: 120.0
  22. Stanislas Dehaene & Laurent Cohen (2007). Response to Carreiras Et Al: The Role of Visual Similarity, Feedforward, Feedback and Lateral Pathways in Reading. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (11):456-457.score: 120.0
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  23. Daniel Schlieî²Mann, Christian Schuld, Matthias Schneiders, Steffen Derlien, Maria Glã¶Ckner, Till Gladow, Norbert Weidner & Rã¼Diger Rupp (2014). Feasibility of Visual Instrumented Movement Feedback Therapy in Individuals with Motor Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury Walking on a Treadmill. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.score: 120.0
  24. Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Neural Mechanisms of Visual Awareness: A Linking Proposition. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1 (3):385-406.score: 102.0
    Recent developments in psychology and neuroscience suggest away to link the mental phenomenon of visual awareness with specific neural processes. Here, it is argued that the feed-forward activation of cells in any area of the brain is not sufficient to generate awareness, but that recurrent processing, mediated by horizontal and feedback connections is necessary. In linking awareness with its neural mechanisms it is furthermore important to dissociate phenomenal awareness from visual attention or decision processes.
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  25. James T. Enns, Alejandro Lleras & Vince Di Lollo (2006). A Reentrant View of Visual Masking, Object Substitution, and Response Priming. In Gmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 127-147). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.score: 96.0
     
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  26. Jean Bullier (2001). Feedback Connections and Conscious Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):369-370.score: 90.0
  27. Jack A. Adams, Philip H. Marshall & Ernest T. Goetz (1972). Response Feedback and Short-Term Motor Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):92.score: 90.0
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  28. John D. Eastwood, From Unconscious to Conscious Perception: Emotionally Expressive Faces and Visual Awareness.score: 90.0
  29. Bernard Weiss (1954). The Role of Proprioceptive Feedback in Positioning Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (3):215.score: 90.0
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  30. Jean Vroomen Yoshimori Sugano, Mirjam Keetels (2012). The Build-Up and Transfer of Sensorimotor Temporal Recalibration Measured Via a Synchronization Task. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 84.0
    The timing relation between a motor action and the sensory consequences of that action can be adapted by exposing participants to artificially delayed feedback (temporal recalibration). Here, we demonstrate that a sensorimotor synchronization task (i.e., tapping the index finger in synchrony with a pacing signal) can be used as a measure of temporal recalibration. Participants were first exposed to a constant delay (~150 ms) between a voluntary action (a finger tap) and an external feedback stimulus of that action (...)
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  31. Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Vincent Walsh (2001). Fast Backprojections From the Motion to the Primary Visual Area Necessary for Visual Awareness. Science 292 (5516):510-512.score: 78.0
  32. Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Blindsight: The Role of Feedforward and Feedback Corticocortical Connections. Acta Psychologica 107 (1):209-228.score: 78.0
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  33. Matthew Brown & Derek Besner (2002). Semantic Priming: On the Role of Awareness in Visual Word Recognition in the Absence of an Expectancy. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):402-422.score: 78.0
  34. Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall (1972). Response Feedback and Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.score: 78.0
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  35. Walter Kintsch & Donald F. McCoy (1964). Delay of Informative Feedback in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (4):372.score: 78.0
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  36. André Brechmann Christin Kohrs, Nicole Angenstein, Henning Scheich (2012). Human Striatum is Differentially Activated by Delayed, Omitted, and Immediate Registering Feedback. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 72.0
    The temporal contingency of feedback during conversations is an essential requirement of a successful dialog. In the current study, we investigated the effects of delayed and omitted registering feedback on fMRI activation and compared both unexpected conditions to immediate feedback. In the majority of trials of an auditory task, participants received an immediate visual feedback which merely indicated that a button press was registered but not whether the response was correct or not. In a minority of (...)
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  37. Thomas Weiss Sandra Preißler, Caroline Dietrich, Kathrin R. Blume, Gunther O. Hofmann, Wolfgang H. R. Miltner (2013). Plasticity in the Visual System is Associated with Prosthesis Use in Phantom Limb Pain. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 72.0
    The experience of strong phantom limb pain (PLP) in arm amputees was previously shown to be associated with structural neural plasticity in parts of the cortex that belong to dorsal and ventral visual streams. It has been speculated that this plasticity results from the extensive use of a functional prosthesis which is associated with increased visual feedback to control the artificial hand. To test this hypothesis, we reanalyzed data of cortical volumes of 21 upper limb amputees and tested the (...)
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  38. Daichi Nozaki Takuya Honda, Masaya Hirashima (2012). Habituation to Feedback Delay Restores Degraded Visuomotor Adaptation by Altering Both Sensory Prediction Error and the Sensitivity of Adaptation to the Error. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 72.0
    Sensory prediction error, which is the difference between actual and predicted sensory consequences, is a driving force of motor learning. Thus, appropriate temporal associations between the actual sensory feedback signals and motor commands for predicting sensory consequences are crucial for the brain to calculate the sensory prediction error accurately. Indeed, it has been shown that artificially introduced delays in visual feedback degrade motor learning. However, our previous study has showed that degraded adaptation is alleviated by prior habituation to (...)
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  39. Harvey S. Smallman & Maia B. Cook (2011). Naïve Realism: Folk Fallacies in the Design and Use of Visual Displays. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):579-608.score: 66.0
    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider trend (...)
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  40. Randall O'Reilly Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. (...)
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  41. Marianne Maertens, Stefan Pollmann, Michael Hanke, Toralf Mildner & Harald E. Möller (2008). Retinotopic Activation in Response to Subjective Contours in Primary Visual Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2:1-7.score: 66.0
    Objects in our visual environment are arranged in depth and hence there is a considerable amount of overlap and occlusion in the image they generate on the retina. In order to properly segment the image into fi gure and background, boundary interpolation is required even across large distances. Here we study the cortical mechanisms involved in collinear contour interpolation using fMRI. Human observers were asked to discriminate the curvature of interpolated boundaries in Kanizsa fi gures and in control confi gurations, (...)
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  42. Dean Wyatte, Seth Herd, Brian Mingus & Randall O'Reilly (2012). The Role of Competitive Inhibition and Top-Down Feedback in Binding During Object Recognition. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 66.0
    How does the brain bind together visual features that are processed concurrently by different neurons into a unified percept suitable for processes such as object recognition? Here, we describe how simple, commonly accepted principles of neural processing can interact over time to solve the brain's binding problem. We focus on mechanisms of neural inhibition and top-down feedback. Specifically, we describe how inhibition creates competition among neural populations that code different features, effectively suppressing irrelevant information, and thus minimizing illusory conjunctions. (...)
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  43. Thomas Miconi & Rufin Vanrullen (2010). The Gamma Slideshow: Object-Based Perceptual Cycles in a Model of the Visual Cortex. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4:205-205.score: 66.0
    While recent studies have shed light on the mechanisms that generate gamma (>40Hz) oscillations, the functional role of these oscillations (if any) is still debated. Here we suggest that the purported mechanism of gamma oscillations (feedback inhibition from local interneurons), coupled with lateral connections implementing “Gestalt” principles of object integration, naturally leads to a decomposition of the visual input into object-based “perceptual cycles”, in which neuron populations representing different objects within the scene will tend to fire at successive cycles (...)
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  44. Yang Xu, Christopher D'Lauro, John A. Pyles, Robert E. Kass & Michael J. Tarr (2013). Fine-Grained Temporal Coding of Visually-Similar Categories in the Ventral Visual Pathway and Prefrontal Cortex. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 66.0
    Humans are remarkably proficient at categorizing visually-similar objects. To better understand the cortical basis of this categorization process, we used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to record neural activity while participants learned--with feedback--to discriminate two highly-similar, novel visual categories. We hypothesized that although prefrontal regions would mediate early category learning, this role would diminish with increasing category familiarity and that regions within the ventral visual pathway would come to play a more prominent role in encoding category-relevant information as learning progressed. Early in (...)
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  45. Trichur Raman Vidyasagar (2013). Reading Into Neuronal Oscillations in the Visual System: Implications for Developmental Dyslexia. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7:811.score: 66.0
    While phonological impairments are common in developmental dyslexia, there has recently been much debate as to whether there is a causal link between the phonological difficulties and the reading problem. An alternative suggestion has been gaining ground that the core deficit in dyslexia is in visual attentional mechanisms. If so, the visual aetiology may be at any of a number of sites along the afferent magnocellular pathway or in the dorsal cortical stream that are all essential for a visuo-spatial attentional (...)
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  46. Romeo Chua & Digby Elliott (1997). Visual Control of Target-Directed Movements. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):304-306.score: 60.0
    Visual feedback regulation during movement is not fully captured in Plamondon's kinematic theory. However, numerous studies indicate that visual response-produced feedback is a powerful determinant of performance and kinematic characteristics of target-directed movement.
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  47. Makoto Ichikawa Masaki Tsujita (2012). Non-Retinotopic Motor-Visual Recalibration to Temporal Lag. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 60.0
    Temporal order judgment between the voluntary motor action and its perceptual feedback is important in distinguishing between a sensory feedback which is caused by observer’s own action and other stimulus, which are irrelevant to that action. Prolonged exposure to fixed temporal lag between motor action and visual feedback recalibrates motor-visual temporal relationship, and consequently shifts the point of subjective simultaneity (PSS). Previous studies on the audio-visual temporal recalibration without voluntary action revealed that both low and high level (...)
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  48. E. Vlainic, R. Liepelt, L. S. Colzato, W. Prinz & B. Hommel (2009). The Virtual Co-Actor: The Social Simon Effect Does Not Rely on Online Feedback From the Other. Frontiers in Psychology 1:208-208.score: 60.0
    The Social Simon effect (SSE) occurs if two participants share a Simon task by making a Go/No-Go response to one of two stimulus features. If the two participants perform this version of the Simon task together, a Simon effect occurs (i.e., performance is better with spatial stimulus-response correspondence), but no effect is observed if participants perform the task separately. The SSE has been attributed to the automatic co-representation of the co-actor’s actions, which suggests that it relies on online information about (...)
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  49. Charles R. Hamilton & Joseph Bossom (1964). Decay of Prism Aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (2):148.score: 60.0
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  50. Lei Wang, Christine Sutter, Ronald Josef Zvonimir Dangel, Jochen Musseler & Catherine Disselhorst-Klug (2012). Perceiving One's Own Limb Movements with Conflicting Sensory Feedback: The Role of Mode of Movement Control and Age. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 60.0
    Previous studies have demonstrated a great uncertainty in evaluating one's own voluntary actions when visual feedback is suspended. We now compare these limitations in younger and older adults during active or passive limb movements. Participants put their dominant hand on a robot arm and performed movements actively or the relaxed limb was moved passively. Either a distorted visual feedback or no visual feedback at all was provided during the movement. Perception of limb movements was attenuated through visual (...)
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