Search results for '*Visual Feedback' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
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  1.  8
    Steven W. Keele & Michael I. Posner (1968). Processing of Visual Feedback in Rapid Movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):155.
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  2.  4
    John D. Gould (1965). Differential Visual Feedback of Component Motions. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (3):263.
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  3.  3
    Ronald W. Angel, Harry Garland & Martin Fischler (1971). Tracking Errors Amended Without Visual Feedback. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (2):422.
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  4. John D. Gould & Amy Schaffer (1965). Partial Visual Feedback of Component Motions as a Function of Difficulty of Motor Control. Journal of Experimental Psychology 70 (6):564.
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  5.  6
    Richard Held, Aglaia Efstathiou & Martha Greene (1966). Adaptation to Displaced and Delayed Visual Feedback From the Hand. Journal of Experimental Psychology 72 (6):887.
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  6.  2
    John Gyr, Richmond Willey & Adele Henry (1979). Motor-Sensory Feedback and Geometry of Visual Space: An Attempted Replication. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 2 (1):59-64.
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  7. Simon Clavagnier, Arnaud Falchier & Henry Kennedy (2004). Long-Distance Feedback Projections to Area V1: Implications for Multisensory Integration, Spatial Awareness, and Visual Consciousness. Cognitive, Affective and Behavioral Neuroscience. Special Issue 4 (2):117-126.
     
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  8.  6
    Gary M. Brosvic, Margaret Farrelly, Edward Rebele, Donna Ribardo, Jill Gutowski, Loreen Kafer & Roberta E. Dihoff (1993). Nonequivalent Roles for Motor and Visual Feedback in the Müller-Lyer and Horizontal-Vertical Illusions. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (1):42-44.
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  9.  6
    Eugene A. Lovelace, Beth A. Vella & Donna M. Anderson (1993). Judging Age From Handwriting Done with and Without Visual Feedback. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 31 (2):111-113.
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  10.  4
    Rixin Tang, Robert L. Whitwell & Melvyn A. Goodale (2015). The Influence of Visual Feedback From the Recent Past on the Programming of Grip Aperture is Grasp-Specific, Shared Between Hands, and Mediated by Sensorimotor Memory Not Task Set. Cognition 138:49-63.
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  11.  73
    Steven Lehar, Computational Implications of Gestalt Theory: The Role of Feedback in Visual Processing.
    Neurophysiological investigations of the visual system by way of single-cell recordings have revealed a hierarchical architecture in which lower level areas, such as the primary visual cortex, contain cells that respond to simple features, while higher level areas contain cells that respond to higher order features apparently composed of combinations of lower level features. This architecture seems to suggest a feed-forward processing strategy in which visual information progresses from lower to higher visual areas. However there is other evidence, both neurophysiological (...)
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  12.  16
    Tony Ro, Bruno Breitmeyer, Philip Burton, Neel S. Singhal & David Lane (2003). Feedback Contributions to Visual Awareness in Human Occipital Cortex. Current Biology 13 (12):1038-1041.
  13.  5
    Thomas L. Bennett & Henry C. Ellis (1968). Tactual-Kinesthetic Feedback From Manipulation of Visual Forms and Nondifferential Reinforcement in Transfer of Perceptual Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3p1):495.
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  14.  8
    Lawrence Brancazio & Carol A. Fowler (2000). Merging Auditory and Visual Phonetic Information: A Critical Test for Feedback? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (3):327-328.
    The present description of the Merge model addresses only auditory, not audiovisual, speech perception. However, recent findings in the audiovisual domain are relevant to the model. We outline a test that we are conducting of the adequacy of Merge, modified to accept visual information about articulation.
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  15.  18
    A. M. Sillito, H. E. Jones, G. L. Gerstein & D. C. West (1994). Feature-Linked Synchronization of Thalamic Relay Cell Firing Induced by Feedback From the Visual Cortex. Nature 369:479-82.
  16.  8
    Stanislas Dehaene & Laurent Cohen (2007). Response to Carreiras Et Al: The Role of Visual Similarity, Feedforward, Feedback and Lateral Pathways in Reading. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 11 (11):456-457.
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  17.  73
    Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Neural Mechanisms of Visual Awareness: A Linking Proposition. [REVIEW] Brain and Mind 1 (3):385-406.
    Recent developments in psychology and neuroscience suggest away to link the mental phenomenon of visual awareness with specific neural processes. Here, it is argued that the feed-forward activation of cells in any area of the brain is not sufficient to generate awareness, but that recurrent processing, mediated by horizontal and feedback connections is necessary. In linking awareness with its neural mechanisms it is furthermore important to dissociate phenomenal awareness from visual attention or decision processes.
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  18.  24
    Matthew Brown & Derek Besner (2002). Semantic Priming: On the Role of Awareness in Visual Word Recognition in the Absence of an Expectancy. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):402-422.
    By hypothesis, awareness is involved in the modulation of feedback from semantics to the lexical level in the visual word recognition system. When subjects are aware of the fact that there are many related prime–target pairs in a semantic priming experiment, this knowledge is used to configure the system to feed activation back from semantics to the lexical level so as to facilitate processing. When subjects are unaware of this fact, the default set is maintained in which activation is (...)
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  19. James T. Enns, Alejandro Lleras & Vince Di Lollo (2006). A Reentrant View of Visual Masking, Object Substitution, and Response Priming. In Gmen, Haluk; Breitmeyer, Bruno G. (2006). The First Half Second: The Microgenesis and Temporal Dynamics of Unconscious and Conscious Visual Processes. (Pp. 127-147). Cambridge, Ma, Us: Mit Press. Xi, 410 Pp.
     
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  20. Jean Bullier (2001). Feedback Connections and Conscious Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (9):369-370.
  21.  2
    Jack A. Adams, Philip H. Marshall & Ernest T. Goetz (1972). Response Feedback and Short-Term Motor Retention. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (1):92.
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  22. John D. Eastwood, From Unconscious to Conscious Perception: Emotionally Expressive Faces and Visual Awareness.
  23. Bernard Weiss (1954). The Role of Proprioceptive Feedback in Positioning Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 47 (3):215.
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  24.  35
    Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Vincent Walsh (2001). Fast Backprojections From the Motion to the Primary Visual Area Necessary for Visual Awareness. Science 292 (5516):510-512.
  25.  29
    Victor A. F. Lamme (2001). Blindsight: The Role of Feedforward and Feedback Corticocortical Connections. Acta Psychologica 107 (1):209-228.
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  26.  6
    Jack A. Adams, Ernest T. Goetz & Phillip H. Marshall (1972). Response Feedback and Motor Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):391.
  27. Walter Kintsch & Donald F. McCoy (1964). Delay of Informative Feedback in Paired-Associate Learning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 68 (4):372.
  28.  26
    Harvey S. Smallman & Maia B. Cook (2011). Naïve Realism: Folk Fallacies in the Design and Use of Visual Displays. Topics in Cognitive Science 3 (3):579-608.
    Often implicit in visual display design and development is a gold standard of photorealism. By approximating direct perception, photorealism appeals to users and designers by being both attractive and apparently effortless. The vexing result from numerous performance evaluations, though, is that increasing realism often impairs performance. Smallman and St. John (2005) labeled misplaced faith in realistic information display Naïve Realism and theorized it resulted from a triplet of folk fallacies about perception. Here, we illustrate issues associated with the wider trend (...)
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  29.  7
    Rich S. W. Masters, Jon P. Maxwell & Frank F. Eves (2009). Marginally Perceptible Outcome Feedback, Motor Learning and Implicit Processes. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (3):639-645.
    Participants struck 500 golf balls to a concealed target. Outcome feedback was presented at the subjective or objective threshold of awareness of each participant or at a supraliminal threshold. Participants who received fully perceptible feedback learned to strike the ball onto the target, as did participants who received feedback that was only marginally perceptible . Participants who received feedback that was not perceptible showed no learning. Upon transfer to a condition in which the target was unconcealed, (...)
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  30.  2
    Romeo Chua & Digby Elliott (1997). Visual Control of Target-Directed Movements. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):304-306.
    Visual feedback regulation during movement is not fully captured in Plamondon's kinematic theory. However, numerous studies indicate that visual response-produced feedback is a powerful determinant of performance and kinematic characteristics of target-directed movement.
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  31. Charles R. Hamilton & Joseph Bossom (1964). Decay of Prism Aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 67 (2):148.
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  32.  4
    Rodney M. J. Cotterill (1996). Prediction and Internal Feedback in Conscious Perception. Journal of Consciousness Studies 3 (3):245-66.
    Recent conjectures regarding the nature and mechanism of consciousness are extended to include the contribution of the cerebellum. The role of this brain structure appears to be a rather sophisticated form of prediction, as exemplified by certain dynamical capabilities of the visual system, and by the difficulty of self-administered tickling. The pars intermedia of the cerebellum is perceived as a direct feedback device, functioning in parallel to the primary neuronal circuit involved in consciousness; this leads to the suggestion that (...)
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  33.  7
    Edmond Wright (2001). A Non-Epistemic, Non-Pictorial, Internal, Material Visual Field. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1010-1011.
    The authors O'Regan & Noë (O&N) have ignored the case for the visual field as being non-epistemic evidence internal to the brain, having no pictorial similarity to the external input, and being material in ontological status. They are also not aware of the case for the evolutionary advantage of learning as the perceptual refashioning of such non-epistemic sensory evidence via motivated feedback in sensorimotor activity.
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  34.  38
    Chris Frith (2005). The Self in Action: Lessons From Delusions of Control. Consciousness and Cognition 14 (4):752-770.
    Patients with delusions of control are abnormally aware of the sensory consequences of their actions and have difficulty with on-line corrections of movement. As a result they do not feel in control of their movements. At the same time they are strongly aware of the action being intentional. This leads them to believe that their actions are being controlled by an external agent. In contrast, the normal mark of the self in action is that we have very little experience of (...)
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  35.  2
    John C. Hay & W. Mack Goldsmith (1973). Space-Time Adaptation of Visual Position Constancy. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (1):1-9.
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  36.  34
    Ravinder Jerath & Molly W. Crawford (2014). Neural Correlates of Visuospatial Consciousness in 3D Default Space: Insights From Contralateral Neglect Syndrome. Consciousness and Cognition 28:81-93.
    One of the most compelling questions still unanswered in neuroscience is how consciousness arises. In this article, we examine visual processing, the parietal lobe, and contralateral neglect syndrome as a window into consciousness and how the brain functions as the mind and we introduce a mechanism for the processing of visual information and its role in consciousness. We propose that consciousness arises from integration of information from throughout the body and brain by the thalamus and that the thalamus reimages visual (...)
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  37. James J. Gibson (1979). The Ecological Approach to Visual Perception. Houghton Mifflin.
    And in the end I came to believe that the whole theory of depth perception was false. I suggested a new theory in a book on what I called the visual world ...
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  38.  22
    M. Tsakiris, G. Prabhu & P. Haggard (2006). Having a Body Versus Moving Your Body: How Agency Structures Body-Ownership. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):423-432.
    We investigated how motor agency in the voluntary control of body movement influences body awareness. In the Rubber Hand Illusion , synchronous tactile stimulation of a rubber hand and the participant’s hand leads to a feeling of the rubber hand being incorporated in the participant’s own body. One quantifiable behavioural correlate of the illusion is an induced shift in the perceived location of the participant’s hand towards the rubber hand. Previous studies showed that the induced changes in body awareness are (...)
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  39.  65
    Jonathan Cole (2009). Impaired Embodiment and Intersubjectivity. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 8 (3):343-360.
    This paper considers the importance of the body for self-esteem, communication, and emotional expression and experience, through the reflections of those who live with various neurological impairments of movement and sensation; sensory deafferentation, spinal cord injury and Möbius Syndrome. People with severe sensory loss, who require conscious attention and visual feedback for movement, describe the imperative to use the same strategies to reacquire gesture, to appear normal and have embodied expression. Those paralysed after spinal cord injury struggle to have (...)
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  40.  22
    Rebekah C. White, Anne M. Aimola Davies, Terri J. Halleen & Martin Davies (2010). Tactile Expectations and the Perception of Self-Touch: An Investigation Using the Rubber Hand Paradigm. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (2):505-519.
    The rubber hand paradigm is used to create the illusion of self-touch, by having the participant administer stimulation to a prosthetic hand while the Examiner, with an identical stimulus , administers stimulation to the participant’s hand. With synchronous stimulation, participants experience the compelling illusion that they are touching their own hand. In the current study, the robustness of this illusion was assessed using incongruent stimuli. The participant used the index finger of the right hand to administer stimulation to a prosthetic (...)
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  41.  13
    Jochen Müsseler & Christine Sutter (2009). Perceiving One's Own Movements When Using a Tool. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (2):359-365.
    The present study examined what participants perceive of their hand movements when using a tool. In the experiments different gains for either the x-axis or the y-axis perturbed the relation between hand movements on a digitizer tablet and cursor movements on a display. As a consequence of the perturbation participants drew circles on the display while their covered hand movements followed either vertical or horizontal ellipses on the digitizer tablet. When asked to evaluate their hand movements, participants were extremely uncertain (...)
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  42. Monica Meijsing (2000). Self-Consciousness and the Body. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):34-50.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  43.  13
    Catherine Preston & Roger Newport (2010). Self-Denial and the Role of Intentions in the Attribution of Agency. Consciousness and Cognition 19 (4):986-998.
    The ability to distinguish between our own actions and those of an external agent is a fundamental component of normal human social interaction. Both low- and high-level mechanisms are thought to contribute to the sense of movement agency, but the contribution of each is yet to be fully understood. By applying small and incremental perturbations to realistic visual feedback of the limb, the influence of high-level action intentions and low-level motor predictive mechanisms were dissociated in two experiments. In the (...)
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  44.  18
    V. S. Ramachandran, Brain.
    This article reviews the potential use of visual feedback, focusing on mirror visual feedback, introduced over 15 years ago, for the treatment of many chronic neurological disorders that have long been regarded as intractable such as phantom pain, hemiparesis from stroke and complex regional pain syndrome. Apart from its clinical importance, mirror visual feedback paves the way for a paradigm shift in the way we approach neurological disorders. Instead of resulting entirely from irreversible damage to specialized brain (...)
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  45.  22
    Jonathan Cole (2000). "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary. Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  46.  3
    Harold Bekkering, Detlef Heck & Fahad Sultan (1996). What has to Be Learned in Motor Learning? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):436-437.
    The present commentary considers the question of what must be learned in different types of motor skills, thereby limiting the question of what should be adjusted in the APG model in order to explain successful learning. It is concluded that an open loop model like the APG might well be able to describe the learning pattern of motor skills in a stable, predictable environment. Recent research on saccadic plasticity, however, illustrates that motor skills performed in an unpredictable (...)
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  47.  2
    P. Paolo Battaglini, Paolo Bernardis & Nicola Bruno (2004). At Least Some Electrophysiological and Behavioural Data Cannot Be Reconciled with the Planning–Control Model. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (1):24-25.
    The planning/control distinction is an important tool in the study of sensorimotor transformations. However, published data from our laboratories suggest that, contrary to what is predicted by the proposed model, (1) structures in the superior parietal lobe of both monkeys and humans can be involved in movement planning; and (2) fast pointing actions can be immune to visual illusions even if they are performed without visual feedback. The planning–control model as proposed by Glover is almost certainly too schematic.
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  48.  1
    Réjean Plamondon (1997). The Kinematic Theory: A New Window to Study and Analyze Simple and Complex Human Movements. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 20 (2):325-343.
    To cover as much as possible the various questions raised by the commentators, I have divided my Response into three major sections. In section R1, I reply to the major comments and remarks dealing with the basic hypothesis upon which the kinematic theory is built (Plamondon 1993b; 1993c; 1995a; 1995b). I focus on linearity, determinism, kinematics, and the biological significance of the model parameters. I conclude this section by showing how, from a practical point of view, the delta-lognormal law can (...)
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  49. Keith Frankish (2006). Review of Consciousness in Action, by Susan Hurley. [REVIEW] Mind 115:156-9.
    Questions about the relation between mind and world have long occupied philosophers of mind. In _Consciousness in Action_ Susan Hurley invites us to adopt a ninety-degree shift and consider the relation between perception and action. The central theme of the book is an attack on what Hurley dubs the _Input-Output Picture_ of perception and actionthe picture of perceptions as sensory inputs to the cognitive system and intentions as motor outputs from it, with the mind occupying the buffer zone in between. (...)
     
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  50. Patrick Haggard (1996). What Can and What Cannot Be Adjusted in the Movement Patterns of Cerebellar Patients? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 19 (3):451-452.
    This commentary reviews the case of a patient who could alter the coordination of her prehensile movements when removal of visual feedback reduced her kinetic tremor, but could not coordinate her hand aperture with her hand transport within a single movement. This suggests a dissociation between different subtypes of cerebellar context-response linkage, rather than a single, general association function, [THACH].
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