Search results for '*Visual Search' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  2
    John D. Gould & David R. Peeples (1970). Eye Movements During Visual Search and Discrimination of Meaningless, Symbol, and Object Patterns. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):51.
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  2.  4
    Charles R. Snyder (1972). Selection, Inspection, and Naming in Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 92 (3):428.
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  3.  3
    Bert F. Green & Lois K. Anderson (1956). Color Coding in a Visual Search Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 51 (1):19.
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  4.  7
    Michael G. Coles (1972). Cardiac and Respiratory Activity During Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):371.
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  5.  1
    Sidney L. Smith (1962). Color Coding and Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (5):434.
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  6.  3
    Ira T. Kaplan, Thomas Carvellas & William Metlay (1966). Visual Search and Immediate Memory. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (4):488.
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  7.  3
    Gerald J. Organt (1971). Effect of M Value on Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (1):171.
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  8.  3
    Joseph F. Hearns & Stanley M. Moss (1968). Effect of Method of Payoff on the Detection of Targets in a Visual Search Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 78 (4p1):569.
  9.  3
    Marc Pomplun, Eyal M. Reingold & Jiye Shen (2003). Area Activation: A Computational Model of Saccadic Selectivity in Visual Search. Cognitive Science 27 (2):299-312.
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  10. Lester E. Krueger (1970). Effect of Frequency of Display on Speed of Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 84 (3):495.
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  11.  1
    Yun Xu, Emily C. Higgins, Mei Xiao & Marc Pomplun (2007). Mapping the Color Space of Saccadic Selectivity in Visual Search. Cognitive Science 31 (5):877-887.
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  12.  2
    Harriet Foster (1962). The Operation of Set in a Visual Search Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 63 (1):74.
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  13.  2
    A. Carpenter (1948). The Rate of Blinking During Prolonged Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 38 (5):587.
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  14.  1
    Jane M. Connor (1972). Serial and Parallel Encoding Processes in Memory and Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 96 (2):363.
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  15. Ian E. Gordon, Victor Dulewicz & Meg Winwood (1971). Irrelevant Item Variety and Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 88 (2):295.
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  16. Joseph F. Hearns (1973). Effects of Prestimulus Cuing and Target Load Variability on Maintenance of Response Strategies in a Visual Search Task. Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):375-380.
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  17. William Metlay, Mark Sokoloff & Ira T. Kaplan (1970). Visual Search for Multiple Targets. Journal of Experimental Psychology 85 (1):148.
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  18.  3
    John D. Gould (1973). Eye Movements During Visual Search and Memory Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 98 (1):184.
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  19.  85
    R. Rensink (2000). Visual Search for Change: A Probe Into the Nature of Attentional Processing. Visual Cognition 7:345-376.
    A set of visual search experiments tested the proposal that focused attention is needed to detect change. Displays were arrays of rectangles, with the target being the item that continually changed its orientation or contrast polarity. Five aspects of performance were examined: linearity of response, processing time, capacity, selectivity, and memory trace. Detection of change was found to be a self-terminating process requiring a time that increased linearly with the number of items in the display. Capacity for orientation was (...)
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  20. Nicoletta Orlandi (2012). Visual Switching: The Illusion of Instantaneity and Visual Search. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 3 (4):469-480.
    This paper questions two prima facie plausible claims concerning switching in the presence of ambiguous figures. The first is the claim that reversing is an instantaneous process. The second is the claim that the ability to reverse demonstrates the interpretive, inferential and constructive nature of visual processing. Empirical studies show that optical and cerebral events related to switching protract in time in a way that clashes with its perceived instantaneity. The studies further suggest an alternative theory of reversing: according to (...)
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  21.  32
    Berit Brogaard, Kristian Marlow & Kevin Rice (forthcoming). Do Synesthetic Colors Grab Attention in Visual Search? Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-14.
    Recent research on synesthesia has focused on how the condition may depend on selective attention, but there is a lack of consensus on whether selective attention is required to bind colors to their grapheme inducers. In the present study, we used a novel change detection paradigm to examine whether synesthetic colors guide the subject’s attention to the location of the inducer or whether selective attention is required to act as a unique feature during visual search. If synesthetic experiences are (...)
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  22.  18
    Ronald Rensink, The Influence of Cast Shadows on Visual Search.
    We show that cast shadows can have a significant influence on the speed of visual search. In particular, we find that search based on the shape of a region is affected when the region is darker than the background and corresponds to a shadow formed by lighting from above. Results support the proposal that an early-level system rapidly identifies regions as shadows and then discounts them, making their shapes more difficult to access. Several constraints used by this system (...)
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  23.  5
    Allison M. Waters & Ottmar V. Lipp (2008). Visual Search for Emotional Faces in Children. Cognition and Emotion 22 (7):1306-1326.
    The ability to rapidly detect facial expressions of anger and threat over other salient expressions has adaptive value across the lifespan. Although studies have demonstrated this threat superiority effect in adults, surprisingly little research has examined the development of this process over the childhood period. In this study, we examined the efficiency of children's facial processing in visual search tasks. In Experiment 1, children (N=49) aged 8 to 11 years were faster and more accurate in detecting angry target (...) embedded in neutral backgrounds than vice versa, and they were slower in detecting the absence of a discrepant face among angry than among neutral faces. This search pattern was unaffected by an increase in matrix size. Faster detection of angry than neutral deviants may reflect that angry faces stand out more among neutral faces than vice versa, or that detection of neutral faces is slowed by the presence of surrounding angry distracters. When keeping the background constant in Experiment 2, children (N=35) aged 8 to 11 years were faster and more accurate in detecting angry than sad or happy target faces among neutral background faces. Moreover, children with higher levels of anxiety were quicker to find both angry and sad faces whereas low anxious children showed an advantage for angry faces only. Results suggest a threat superiority effect in processing facial expressions in young children as in adults and that increased sensitivity for negative faces may be characteristic of children with anxiety problems. (shrink)
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  24.  17
    Ronald Rensink, The Influence of Line Relations on Visual Search.
    It has generally been assumed that parallel visual search can only be based on the presence of simple features -- the spatial relations between features do not influence this process. We describe a series of visual search experiments that contradict this assumption. Search for line drawings of opaque polyhedra is greatly influenced by some line relations. In particular, search is rapid for line drawings (i) that have arrow- and Y-junctions corresponding to corners formed from orthogonal surfaces, (...)
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  25.  11
    Ronald Rensink, Sensitivity to Three-Dimensional Orientation in Visual Search.
    Previous theories of early vision have assumed that visual search is based on simple two-dimensional aspects of an image, such as the orientation of edges and lines. It is shown here that search can also be based on three-dimensional orientation of objects in the corresponding scene, provided that these objects are simple convex blocks. Direct comparison shows that image-based and scene-based orientation are similar in their ability to facilitate search. These findings support the hypothesis that scene-based properties (...)
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  26.  5
    Ronald Rensink, Vsearch Color: Full-Color Visual Search Experiments on the MacIntosh II.
    We describe an update to our visual search software for the Macintosh line of computers. The new software, VSearch Color, gives users access to the full-color capabilities of the Macintosh II line. One of the key features of the new software is its ability to treat graphics information separately from color information. This makes it easy to study color independently of form, to design experiments based on isoluminant stimuli, and to incorporate texture segregation, visual identification, number discrimination, adaptation, masking, (...)
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  27.  6
    Ronald Rensink, Influence of Scene-Based Properties on Visual Search.
    The task of visual search is to determine as rapidly as possible whether a target item is present or absent in a display. Rapidly detected items are thought to contain features that correspond to primitive elements in the human visual system. In previous theories, it has been assumed that visual search is based on simple two-dimensional features in the image. However, visual search also has access to another level of representation, one that describes properties in the corresponding (...)
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  28.  6
    Ronald Rensink, Rapid Resumption: A New Form of Memory in Visual Search.
    We report on a new visual search task in which observers make highly accurate two-alternative forced-choice responses within 100-400 ms of display onset. This is a striking result, since accurate responding in a difficult search of this kind is usually possible only after at least 500 ms from display onset. The conditions under which such rapid responses are obtained involve brief initial glimpses of a search display interrupted by either a blank screen or a glimpse of a (...)
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  29.  2
    Lester E. Krueger (1970). Search Time in a Redundant Visual Display. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (3p1):391.
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  30.  4
    Charles W. Eriksen & James F. Collins (1969). Visual Perceptual Rate Under Two Conditions of Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 80 (3p1):489.
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  31. S. Viterbo McCarthy (1972). Visual Serial Search Performance for Number and Letter Targets. Journal of Experimental Psychology 95 (1):233.
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  32.  1
    Ian E. Gordon (1968). Interactions Between Items in Visual Search. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (3p1):348.
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  33. Donald A. Shurtleff & Marion Y. Marsetta (1968). Visual Search in a Letter-Canceling Task Reexamined. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (1):19-23.
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  34.  12
    A. GAlpin, G. Underwood & P. ChaPman (2008). Sensing Without Seeing in Comparative Visual Search. Consciousness and Cognition 17 (3):672-687.
    Rensink [Rensink, R. A. . Visual sensing without seeing. Psychological Science, 15, 27–32] has presented evidence suggesting visual changes may be sensed without an accompanying visual experience. Here, we report two experiments in which we monitored observers’ eye-movements whilst they searched for a difference between two simultaneously presented images and pressed separate response keys when a difference was seen or sensed. We first assessed whether sensing performance was random by collecting ratings of confidence in the validity of sensing and assessing (...)
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  35.  4
    John Palmer (1998). Attentional Effects in Visual Search: Relating Search Accuracy and Search Time. In Richard D. Wright (ed.), Visual Attention. Oxford University Press 8--348.
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  36.  2
    Daniel Lundqvist, Pernilla Juth & Arne Öhman (2014). Using Facial Emotional Stimuli in Visual Search Experiments: The Arousal Factor Explains Contradictory Results. Cognition and Emotion 28 (6):1012-1029.
  37.  3
    Gabriel Reyes & Jérôme Sackur (2014). Introspection During Visual Search. Consciousness and Cognition 29:212-229.
  38.  14
    Jeremy M. Wolfe (2003). Moving Towards Solutions to Some Enduring Controversies in Visual Search. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 7 (2):70-76.
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  39.  9
    Jeremy M. Wolfe, Melissa L.-H. Võ, Karla K. Evans & Michelle R. Greene (2011). Visual Search in Scenes Involves Selective and Nonselective Pathways. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):77-84.
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  40.  1
    Manuel G. Calvo & Hipolito Marrero (2009). Visual Search of Emotional Faces: The Role of Affective Content and Featural Distinctiveness. Cognition and Emotion 23 (4):782-806.
  41. Ruth A. Savage & Ottmar V. Lipp (2015). The Effect of Face Inversion on the Detection of Emotional Faces in Visual Search. Cognition and Emotion 29 (6):972-991.
  42.  1
    Daniel Lundqvist, Neil Bruce & Arne Öhman (2015). Finding an Emotional Face in a Crowd: Emotional and Perceptual Stimulus Factors Influence Visual Search Efficiency. Cognition and Emotion 29 (4):621-633.
  43.  9
    Gernot Horstmann (2009). Visual Search for Schematic Affective Faces: Stability and Variability of Search Slopes with Different Instances. Cognition and Emotion 23 (2):355-379.
  44.  13
    Martin Eimer (2014). The Neural Basis of Attentional Control in Visual Search. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 18 (10):526-535.
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  45.  4
    Marc Pomplun, Lorenz Sichelschmidt, Karin Wagner, Thomas Clermont, Gert Rickheit & Helge Ritter (2001). Comparative Visual Search: A Difference That Makes a Difference. Cognitive Science 25 (1):3-36.
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  46.  5
    Johan Hulleman & Christian N. L. Olivers (forthcoming). The Impending Demise of the Item in Visual Search. Behavioral and Brain Sciences:1-76.
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  47.  16
    Anders Flykt & Roberto Caldara (2006). Tracking Fear in Snake and Spider Fearful Participants During Visual Search: A Multi-Response Domain Study. Cognition and Emotion 20 (8):1075-1091.
  48.  7
    Michelle R. Greene Jeremy M. Wolfe, Melissa L.-H. Vo, Karla K. Evans (2011). Visual Search in Scenes Involves Selective and Non-Selective Pathways. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (2):77.
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  49.  4
    Kathleen M. Mak-Fan, William F. Thompson & Robin Ea Green (2011). Visual Search for Schematic Emotional Faces Risks Perceptual Confound. Cognition and Emotion 25 (4):573-584.
  50.  5
    Liqiang Huang & Harold Pashler (2005). Attention Capacity and Task Difficulty in Visual Search. Cognition 94 (3):B101-B111.
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