Search results for '*Visual Stimulation' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
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  1.  3
    Julian E. Hochberg, William Triebel & Gideon Seaman (1951). Color Adaptation Under Conditions of Homogeneous Visual Stimulation (Ganzfeld). Journal of Experimental Psychology 41 (2):153.
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  2.  7
    W. W. Breen, M. J. De Haemer & G. K. Poock (1969). Comparison of the Effect of Auditory Versus Visual Stimulation on Information Capacity of Discrete Motor Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 82 (2):395.
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  3.  4
    Leonard T. Troland (1917). On the Measurement of Visual Stimulation Intensities. Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (1):1-33.
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  4.  5
    S. H. Bartley (1940). The Relation Between Cortical Response to Visual Stimulation and Changes in the Alpha Rhythm. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (6):624.
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  5.  4
    I. L. Child & G. R. Wendt (1938). The Temporal Course of the Influence of Visual Stimulation Upon the Auditory Threshold. Journal of Experimental Psychology 23 (2):109.
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  6.  2
    R. M. Cruikshank (1937). Human Occipital Brain Potentials as Affected by Intensity-Duration Variables of Visual Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 21 (6):625.
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  7.  2
    Lee W. Gregg & W. J. Brogden (1952). The Effect of Simultaneous Visual Stimulation on Absolute Auditory Sensitivity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (3):179.
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  8.  1
    Herbert L. Pick Jr, Marvis Hetherington & Roland Belknapp (1962). The Effects of Differential Visual Stimulation After Induction of Visual Aftereffects. Journal of Experimental Psychology 64 (5):425.
  9.  3
    W. S. Hunter & M. Sigler (1940). The Span of Visual Discrimination as a Function of Time and Intensity of Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 26 (2):160.
  10.  4
    Marie-Hélène Grosbras & Tomáš Paus (2003). Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Human Frontal Eye Field Facilitates Visual Awareness. European Journal of Neuroscience 18 (11):3121-3126.
  11.  1
    Sheldon Cashdan (1968). Visual and Haptic Form Discrimination Under Conditions of Successive Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 76 (2p1):215.
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  12.  4
    Seymour Wapner, Heinz Werner & Kenneth A. Chandler (1951). Experiments on Sensory-Tonic Field Theory of Perception: I. Effect of Extraneous Stimulation on the Visual Perception of Verticality. Journal of Experimental Psychology 42 (5):341.
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  13.  4
    H. D. Kimmel & A. J. Goldstein (1967). Retention of Habituation of the Gsr to Visual and Auditory Stimulation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 73 (3):401.
  14.  2
    W. D. Serrat & T. Karwoski (1936). An Investigation of the Effect of Auditory Stimulation on Visual Sensitivity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 19 (5):604.
  15.  2
    H. E. Page (1941). The Relation Between Area of Stimulation and Intensity of Light at Various Levels of Visual Excitation as Measured by Pupil Constriction. Journal of Experimental Psychology 29 (3):177.
  16.  2
    Robert Fried & Richard G. Lathrop (1965). Effect of Extraneous Stimulation on the Visual Perception of Verticality: A Failure to Replicate. Journal of Experimental Psychology 69 (3):327.
  17.  1
    G. W. Hartmann (1933). II. Changes in Visual Acuity Through Simultaneous Stimulation of Other Sense Organs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (3):393.
  18.  1
    C. H. Honzik (1933). A Note on Hartmann's Experiments Showing the Effect on Visual Acuity of Simultaneous Stimulation of Other Sense Organs. Journal of Experimental Psychology 16 (6):875-878.
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  19.  3
    Richard F. Thompson, James F. Voss & W. J. Brogden (1958). Effect of Brightness of Simultaneous Visual Stimulation on Absolute Auditory Sensitivity. Journal of Experimental Psychology 55 (1):45.
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  20.  11
    Bruno G. Breitmeyer, Tony Ro & Haluk Ogmen (2004). A Comparison of Masking by Visual and Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: Implications for the Study of Conscious and Unconscious Visual Processing. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):829-843.
    Visual stimuli as well as transcranial magnetic stimulation can be used: to suppress the visibility of a target and to recover the visibility of a target that has been suppressed by another mask. Both types of stimulation thus provide useful methods for studying the microgenesis of object perception. We first review evidence of similarities between the processes by which a TMS mask and a visual mask can either suppress the visibility of targets or recover such suppressed visibility. However, (...)
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  21.  1
    Jennifer Wheeler Makin & Richard Deni (1982). Selection of Contingent Vs. Noncontingent Schedules of Visual Stimulation by Infants. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 19 (2):71-73.
  22.  14
    Mika Koivisto, Henry Railo & Niina Salminen-Vaparanta (2011). Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of Early Visual Cortex Interferes with Subjective Visual Awareness and Objective Forced-Choice Performance. Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):288-298.
    In order to study whether there exist a period of activity in the human early visual cortex that contributes exclusively to visual awareness, we applied transcranial magnetic stimulation over the early visual cortex and measured subjective visual awareness during visual forced-choice symbol or orientation discrimination tasks. TMS produced one dip in awareness 60–120 ms after stimulus onset, while forced-choice orientation discrimination was suppressed between 60 and 90 ms and symbol discrimination between 60 and 120 ms. Thus, a time window (...)
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  23.  5
    Douglas W. Cunningham (2008). Visual Prediction as Indicated by Perceptual Adaptation to Temporal Delays and Discrete Stimulation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (2):203-204.
    Analogous to prism adaptation, sensorimotor compensation for existing neural delays has been clearly demonstrated. This system can also adapt to new delays, both internal and external. This seems to occur at least partially in the sensor systems, and works for discrete, stationary events. This provides additional evidence for visual prediction, but not in a manner that is consistent with spatial extrapolation.
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  24. Mark A. Elliott, Doerthe Seifert, Dorothe A. Poggel & Hans Strasburger (2015). Transient Increase of Intact Visual Field Size by High-Frequency Narrow-Band Stimulation. Consciousness and Cognition 32:45-55.
  25.  7
    Vincent Walsh & Alan Cowey (1998). Magnetic Stimulation Studies of Visual Cognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):103-110.
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  26.  3
    Frank H. Farley & James M. Peterson (1974). The Stimulation-Seeking Motive: Relationship to Apparent Visual Movement. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 3 (4):271-272.
  27.  4
    John W. Gyr (1980). Visual Perception is Underdetermined by Stimulation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (3):386.
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  28.  4
    James K. Walsh (1973). Effect of Visual and Tactual Stimulation on Learning Abstract Forms: A Replication. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 2 (6):357-359.
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  29. E. Ashbridge, V. Walsh & A. Cowey (1996). A Study of Visual Search by Means of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation of the Parietal Cortex. In Enrique Villanueva (ed.), Perception. Ridgeview 1374-1374.
     
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  30. Joshua D. Cosman, Priyanka V. Atreya & Geoffrey F. Woodman (2015). Transient Reduction of Visual Distraction Following Electrical Stimulation of the Prefrontal Cortex. Cognition 145:73-76.
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  31.  62
    Diego Fernandez-Duque & Ian Thornton (2000). Change Detection Without Awareness: Do Explicit Reports Underestimate the Representation of Change in the Visual System? Visual Cognition 7 (1):323-344.
    Evidence from many different paradigms (e.g. change blindness, inattentional blindness, transsaccadic integration) indicate that observers are often very poor at reporting changes to their visual environment. Such evidence has been used to suggest that the spatio-temporal coherence needed to represent change can only occur in the presence of focused attention. In four experiments we use modified change blindness tasks to demonstrate (a) that sensitivity to change does occur in the absence of awareness, and (b) this sensitivity does not rely on (...)
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  32.  12
    Daniel A. Pollen (2004). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):626-645.
    Libet discovered that a substantial duration (> 0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of the somatosensory cortex at threshold currents is required before human subjects can report that a conscious somatosensory experience had occurred. Using a reaction time method we confirm that a similarly long stimulation duration at threshold currents is required for activation of elementary visual experiences (phosphenes) in human subjects following stimulation of the surface of the striate cortex. However, the reaction times (...)
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  33.  18
    Daniel T. Levin, Sarah B. Drivdahl, Nausheen Momen & Melissa R. Beck (2002). False Predictions About the Detectability of Visual Changes: The Role of Beliefs About Attention, Memory, and the Continuity of Attended Objects in Causing Change Blindness Blindness. Consciousness and Cognition 11 (4):507-527.
    Recently, a number of experiments have emphasized the degree to which subjects fail to detect large changes in visual scenes. This finding, referred to as “change blindness,” is often considered surprising because many people have the intuition that such changes should be easy to detect. Levin, Momen, Drivdahl, and Simons documented this intuition by showing that the majority of subjects believe they would notice changes that are actually very rarely detected. Thus subjects exhibit a metacognitive error we refer to as (...)
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  34.  24
    T. W. Kjaer, M. Nowak, K. W. Kjaer, A. R. Lou & H. C. Lou (2001). Precuneus-Prefrontal Activity During Awareness of Visual Verbal Stimuli. Consciousness and Cognition 10 (3):356-365.
    Awareness is a personal experience, which is only accessible to the rest of world through interpretation. We set out to identify a neural correlate of visual awareness, using brief subliminal and supraliminal verbal stimuli while measuring cerebral blood flow distribution with H215O PET. Awareness of visual verbal stimuli differentially activated medial parietal association cortex (precuneus), which is a polymodal sensory cortex, and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, which is thought to be primarily executive. Our results suggest participation of these higher order perceptual (...)
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  35.  12
    V. di Lollo, James T. Enns & R. Rensink (2000). Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes. Journal Of Experimental Psychology-General 129 (4):481-507.
  36.  67
    Randolph Blake, Duje Tadin, Kenith V. Sobel, Tony A. Raissian & Sang Chul Chong (2006). Strength of Early Visual Adaptation Depends on Visual Awareness. Pnas Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 103 (12):4783-4788.
  37.  18
    Juha Silvanto, Nilli Lavie & Vincent Walsh (2005). Double Dissociation of V1 and V5/MT Activity in Visual Awareness. Cerebral Cortex 15 (11):1736-1741.
  38.  30
    Mika Koivisto & Antti Revonsuo (2003). An ERP Study of Change Detection, Change Blindness, and Visual Awareness. Psychophysiology 40 (3):423-429.
  39.  12
    Gregory Francis & Frouke Hermens (2002). Comment on Competition for Consciousness Among Visual Events: The Psychophysics of Reentrant Visual Processes (di Lollo, Enns & Rensink, 2000). Journal of Experimental Psychology 131 (4):590-593.
  40.  28
    K. Yarrow, Patrick Haggard & J. Rothwell (2004). Action, Arousal, and Subjective Time. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):373-390.
    Saccadic chronostasis refers to the subjective temporal lengthening of the first visual stimulus perceived after an eye movement. It has been quantified using a duration discrimination task. Most models of human duration discrimination hypothesise an internal clock. These models could explain chronostasis as a transient increase in internal clock speed due to arousal following a saccade, leading to temporal overestimation. Two experiments are described which addressed this hypothesis by parametrically varying the duration of the stimuli that are being judged. Changes (...)
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  41.  39
    T. G. Beteleva & D. A. Farber (2002). Role of the Frontal Cortical Areas in the Analysis of Visual Stimuli at Conscious and Unconscious Levels. Human Physiology 28 (5):511-519.
  42. R. Nijhawan & B. Khurana (2000). Conscious Registration of Continuous and Discrete Visual Events. In Thomas Metzinger (ed.), Neural Correlates of Consciousness. MIT Press
  43.  24
    Ramesh Srinivasan & Sanja Petrovic (2006). Meg Phase Follows Conscious Perception During Binocular Rivalry Induced by Visual Stream Segregation. Cerebral Cortex 16 (5):597-608.
  44.  23
    Claudio Babiloni, Fabrizio Vecchio, Alessandro Bultrini, Gian Luca Romani & Paolo Maria Rossini (2006). Pre- and Poststimulus Alpha Rhythms Are Related to Conscious Visual Perception: A High-Resolution EEC Study. Cerebral Cortex 16 (12):1690-1700.
  45.  5
    H. Wallach (1940). The Role of Head Movements and Vestibular and Visual Cues in Sound Localization. Journal of Experimental Psychology 27 (4):339.
  46. Heinz Schärli, P. Brugger, M. Regard, C. Mohr & Th Landis (2003). Localisation of "Unseen" Visual Stimuli: Blindsight in Normal Observers? Swiss Journal of Psychology - Schweizerische Zeitschrift Für Psychologie - Revue Suisse de Psychologie 62 (3):159-165.
     
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  47.  1
    Cecil W. Mann (1952). Visual Factors in the Perception of Verticality. Journal of Experimental Psychology 44 (6):460.
  48. Tirin Moore, Hillary R. Rodman & Charles G. Gross (2001). Recovery of Visual Function Following Damage to the Striate Cortex in Monkeys. In Beatrice De Gelder, Edward H. F. De Haan & Charles A. Heywood (eds.), Out of Mind: Varieties of Unconscious Processes. Oxford University Press 35-51.
     
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  49.  24
    Daniel A. Pollen (2006). Brain Stimulation and Conscious Experience: Electrical Stimulation of the Cortical Surface at a Threshold Current Evokes Sustained Neuronal Activity Only After a Prolonged Latency. Consciousness and Cognition 15 (3):560-565.
    Libet demonstrated that a substantial duration (>0.5-1.0 s) of direct electrical stimulation of the surface of a sensory cortex at a threshold or liminal current is required before a subject can experience a percept. Libet and his co-workers originally proposed that the result could be due either to spatial and temporal facilitation of the underlying neurons or additionally to a prolonged central processing time. However, over the next four decades, Libet chose to attribute the prolonged latency for evoking conscious (...)
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  50.  35
    Alvaro Pascual-Leone & Vincent Walsh (2001). Fast Backprojections From the Motion to the Primary Visual Area Necessary for Visual Awareness. Science 292 (5516):510-512.
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