Search results for '*Volition' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Jing Zhu (2004). Locating Volition. Consciousness and Cognition 13 (2):302-322.score: 12.0
    In this paper, it is examined how neuroscience can help to understand the nature of volition by addressing the question whether volitions can be localized in the brain. Volitions, as acts of the will, are special mental events or activities by which an agent consciously and actively exercises her agency to voluntarily direct her thoughts and actions. If we can pinpoint when and where volitional events or activities occur in the brain and find out their neural underpinnings, this can substantively (...)
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  2. Jing Zhu (2004). Understanding Volition. Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):247-274.score: 12.0
    The concept of volition has a long history in Western thought, but is looked upon unfavorably in contemporary philosophy and psychology. This paper proposes and elaborates a unifying conception of volition, which views volition as a mediating executive mental process that bridges the gaps between an agent's deliberation, decision and voluntary bodily action. Then the paper critically examines three major skeptical arguments against volition: volition is a mystery, volition is an illusion, and volition is a fundamentally flawed conception that leads (...)
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  3. Hugh J. McCann (1974). Volition and Basic Action. Philosophical Review 83 (4):451-473.score: 10.0
    The purpose of this paper is to defend the view that the bodily actions of men typicaly involve a mental action of voliton or willing, and that such mental acts are, in at least one important sense, the basic actions we perform when we do things like raise an arm, move a finger, or flex a muscle.
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  4. Jean E. Burns (1999). Volition and Physical Laws. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (10):27-47.score: 10.0
  5. Scott E. Weiner (2003). Unity of Agency and Volition: Some Personal Reflections. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (4):369-372.score: 10.0
  6. Hamish J. McLeod, Mitchell K. Byrne & Rachel Aitken (2004). Automatism and Dissociation: Disturbances of Consciousness and Volition From a Psychological Perspective. International Journal of Law and Psychiatry 27 (5):471-487.score: 10.0
  7. Jack Glaser & John F. Kihlstrom (2005). Compensatory Automaticity: Unconscious Volition is Not an Oxymoron. In Ran R. Hassin, James S. Uleman & John A. Bargh (eds.), The New Unconscious. Oxford Series in Social Cognition and Social Neuroscience. Oxford University Press. 171-195.score: 10.0
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  8. Gilberto Gomes (1999). Volition and the Readiness Potential. Journal of Consciousness Studies 6 (8-9):59-76.score: 8.0
    1. Introduction The readiness potential was found to precede voluntary acts by about half a second or more (Kornhuber & Deecke, 1965). Kornhuber (1984) discussed the readiness potential in terms of volition, arguing that it is not the manifestation of an attentional processes. Libet discussed it in relation to consciousness and to free will (Libet et al. 1983a; 1983b; Libet, 1985, 1992, 1993). Libet asked the following questions. Are voluntary acts initiated by a conscious decision to act? Are the physiological (...)
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  9. Hakwan Lau (2009). Volition and the Function of Consciousness. Faith and Philosophy 26 (5):537-552.score: 8.0
    People have intuitively assumed that many acts of volition are not influenced by unconscious information. However, the available evidence suggests that under suitable conditions, unconscious information can influence behavior and the underlying neural mechanisms. One possibility is that stimuli that are consciously perceived tend to yield strong signals in the brain, and this makes us think that consciousness has the function of sending such strong signals. However, if we could create conditions where the stimuli could produce strong signals but not (...)
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  10. Thomas Metzinger (2006). Conscious Volition and Mental Representation: Toward a More Fine-Grained Analysis. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press.score: 8.0
    A Bradford Book The MIT Press Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England.
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  11. Jeffrey Purinton (1999). Epicurus on 'Free Volition' and the Atomic Swerve. Phronesis 44 (4):253-299.score: 8.0
    The central thesis of this paper is that Epicurus held that swerves of the constituent atoms of agents' minds cause the agents' volitions from the bottom up. "De Rerum Natura" 2.216-93 is examined at length, and Lucretius is found to be making the following claims: both atoms and macroscopic bodies sometimes swerve as they fall, but so minimally that they are undetectable. Swerves are oblique deviations, not right-angled turns. Swerves must be posited to account both for cosmogonic collisions quite generally (...)
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  12. Andrew Tallon (1997). Head and Heart: Affection, Cognition, Volition as Triune Consciousness. Fordham University Press.score: 8.0
    Head and Heart proposes a theory of a triune consciousness formed by the heart and mind, composed of an equal partnership of reason, will, and affection. Professor Tallon sets out asking whether and how affective consciousness fits into this triad. By first defining affection in terms of intentionality (as the theory of a triune consciousness is possible only when affectivity has been shown to participate in intentionality), he argues that affection, in its full scope of passion, emotion, and mood, earns (...)
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  13. Dr Wayne Christensen (2007). The Evolutionary Origins of Volition. In Cogprints.score: 8.0
    It appears to be a straightforward implication of distributed cognition principles that there is no integrated executive control system (e.g. Brooks 1991, Clark 1997). If distributed cognition is taken as a credible paradigm for cognitive science this in turn presents a challenge to volition because the concept of volition assumes integrated information processing and action control. For instance the process of forming a goal should integrate information about the available action options. If the goal is acted upon these processes should (...)
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  14. Edward S. Reed (1990). The Trapped Infinity: Cartesian Volition as Conceptual Nightmare. Philosophical Psychology 3 (1):101-121.score: 8.0
    Abstract Descartes's theory of volition as expressed in his Passions of the Soul is analyzed and outlined. The focus is not on Descartes's proposed answers to questions about the nature and processes of volition, but on his way of formulating questions about the nature of volition. It is argued that the assumptions underlying Descartes's questions have become ?intellectual strait?jackets? for all who are interested in volition: neuroscientists, philosophers and psychologists. It is shown that Descartes's basic assumption?that volition causes change in (...)
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  15. Dr Wayne Christensen (2006). The Evolutionary Origins of Volition. In [Book Chapter] (in Press).score: 8.0
    It appears to be a straightforward implication of distributed cognition principles that there is no integrated executive control system (e.g. Brooks 1991, Clark 1997). If distributed cognition is taken as a credible paradigm for cognitive science this in turn presents a challenge to volition because the concept of volition assumes integrated information processing and action control. For instance the process of forming a goal should integrate information about the available action options. If the goal is acted upon these processes should (...)
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  16. Wayne Christensen (2007). 12 The Evolutionary Origins of Volition. In Don Ross, David Spurrett, Harold Kincaid & G. Lynn Stephens (eds.), Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context. Mit Press. 255.score: 8.0
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  17. Jordan Grafman & Frank Krueger (2006). Volition and the Human Prefrontal Cortex. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press.score: 8.0
  18. Marc Jeannerod (2006). From Volition to Agency: The Mechanism of Action Recognition and its Failures. In Natalie Sebanz & Wolfgang Prinz (eds.), Disorders of Volition. MIT Press.score: 8.0
  19. P. Nowakowski (2009). Breaking the Spell of Volition. Book Review Of: Natalie Sebanz and Wolfgang Prinz (Eds.) (2006) Disorders of Volition. Constructivist Foundations 4 (3):172 - 173.score: 8.0
    Summary: This volume is interesting and worth reading as an introduction to the philosophical and cognitive neuroscience research on volition.
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  20. Harry G. Frankfurt (1999). Necessity, Volition, and Love. Cambridge University Press.score: 6.0
    One of the most influential of contemporary philosophers, Harry Frankfurt has made major contributions to the philosophy of action, moral psychology, and the study of Descartes. This collection of essays complements an earlier collection published by Cambridge, The Importance of What We Care About. Some of the essays develop lines of thought found in the earlier volume. They deal in general with foundational metaphysical and epistemological issues concerning Descartes, moral philosophy, and philosophical anthropology. Some bear upon topics in political philosophy (...)
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  21. Keith Hossack (2003). Consciousness in Act and Action. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):187-203.score: 6.0
    This paper develops an account of consciousness in action. Both consciousness and action are related to knowledge. A voluntary action is defined as a volition, or something intentionally effected by means of such volitions. Volitions are conscious mental acts whose proper function is to make their content true. A mental act is the exercise of a power of mind and a conscious mental act is identical with knowledge of its own phenomenal character. This set of definitions elucidates the relations between (...)
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  22. Joshua M. Wood (2014). Hume and the Metaphysics of Agency. Journal of the History of Philosophy 52 (1):87-112.score: 6.0
    I examine Hume’s ‘construal of the basic structure of human agency’ and his ‘analysis of human agency’ as they arise in his investigation of causal power. Hume’s construal holds both that volition is separable from action and that the causal mechanism of voluntary action is incomprehensible. Hume’s analysis argues, on the basis of these two claims, that we cannot draw the concept of causal power from human agency. Some commentators suggest that Hume’s construal of human agency is untenable, unduly skeptical, (...)
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  23. George Ainslie (2005). Précis of Breakdown of Will. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (5):635-650.score: 6.0
    Behavioral science has long been puzzled by the experience of temptation, the resulting impulsiveness, and the variably successful control of this impulsiveness. In conventional theories, a governing faculty like the ego evaluates future choices consistently over time, discounting their value for delay exponentially, that is, by a constant rate; impulses arise when this ego is confronted by a conditioned appetite. Breakdown of Will (Ainslie 2001) presents evidence that contradicts this model. Both people and nonhuman animals spontaneously discount the value of (...)
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  24. Frederick Adams & Alfred R. Mele (1992). The Intention/Volition Debate. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 22 (3):323-337.score: 6.0
  25. Bernard J. Baars (1992). Experimental Slips and Human Error: Exploring the Architecture of Volition. Plenum Press.score: 6.0
    This work makes three valuable contributions to the study of human slips and errors.
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  26. Bruce Mangan (2003). Volition and Property Dualism. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (12):29-34.score: 6.0
  27. G. Young (2006). Preserving the Role of Conscious Decision Making in the Initiation of Intentional Action. Journal of Consciousness Studies 13 (3):51-68.score: 6.0
    The aim of this paper is to challenge the claim that the neural activity commonly referred to as 'readiness potential' constitutes evidence for the unconscious initiation of action. Although I accept that such neural activity seriously challenges the commonly held view that one's sense of volition is causally efficacious, I nevertheless contend that much of our everyday engagement with the world is consciously initiated. Thus, a distinction is made between awareness and what the awareness is of: the latter constituting the (...)
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  28. Zenon Pylyshyn (2004). The Illusion of Explanation: The Experience of Volition, Mental Effort, and Mental Imagery. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (5):672-673.score: 6.0
    This commentary argues that the “illusion” to which Wegner refers in The Illusion of Conscious Will is actually the illusion that our conscious experience of mentally causing certain behaviors explains the behavior in question: It is not the subjective experience itself that is illusory, but the implied causal explanation. The experience of “mental effort” is cited as another example of this sort of illusion. Another significant example is the experience that properties of the representation of our mental images are responsible (...)
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  29. Basil Smith (2001). Necessity, Volition, and Love Harry G. Frankfurt New York: Cambridge University Press, 1998, Xii + 180 Pp., $54.95, $17.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Dialogue 40 (02):411-.score: 6.0
  30. G. A. Kimble & L. C. Perlmuter (1970). The Problem of Volition. Psychological Review 77:361-84.score: 6.0
  31. Benjamin Libet (1992). The Neural Time - Factor in Perception, Volition and Free Will. Revue de Métaphysique Et de Morale 97 (2):255 - 272.score: 6.0
  32. Hugh McCann (1975). Trying, Paralysis, and Volition. Review of Metaphysics 28 (3):423-442.score: 6.0
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  33. Paul E. Tibbetts (2001). The Anterior Cingulate Cortex, Akinetic Mutism, and Human Volition. Brain and Mind 2 (3):323-341.score: 6.0
    The anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)has been identified as part of a supervisoryattentional network for selecting alternativemotor programs in response to top-down corticalprocessing, particularly in situationsinvolving conflicting cognitive tasks.Bilateral lesions to the ACC may be causallyassociated with akinetic mutism, where patientsare unable to voluntarily initiate responses.The clinical and neuroanatomical evidence forthis presumed causal association is examined atlength. However, given the many reciprocalprojections between cerebral, motor, limbic andparalimbic structures within the executivesupervisory network, the association ofvoluntary behavior with a particular structure(the ACC) is (...)
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  34. Bruce Aune (1974). Prichard, Action, and Volition. Philosophical Studies 25 (2):97 - 116.score: 6.0
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  35. Jing Zhu (2004). Intention and Volition. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 34 (2):175 - 193.score: 6.0
  36. Francis H. Bradley (1888). On Pleasure, Pain, Desire and Volition. Mind 13 (49):1-36.score: 6.0
  37. James Stacey Taylor (2002). Harry G. Frankfurt, Necessity, Volition and Love. Journal of Value Inquiry 36 (1):125-130.score: 6.0
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  38. T. Vierkant (2009). Distributed Cognition and the Will: Individual Volition and Social Context, Edited by Don Ross, David Spurrett, Harold Kincaid, and G. Lynn Stephens. Mind 118 (471):870-874.score: 6.0
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  39. C. Jason Throop (2010). Philosophers Since the Time of the ancientGreekshave Tended to Categorize Subjective Expe-Rience According to Three Basic Faculties. These Include the Faculty of Percep-Tion (Cognition, Intellection, Memory), the Faculty of Feeling (Emotion, Affect, Sensation), and the Faculty of Will (Volition, Conflation, Intention). While This Tripartite Set has Long Informed Philosophical and Later Psychological Models of the Fundamental Structures of Subjective Experience, the Faculty of Will has Remained Largely ... [REVIEW] In Keith M. Murphy & C. Jason Throop (eds.), Toward an Anthropology of the Will. Stanford University Press. 28.score: 6.0
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  40. Hillel Braude (2009). The Target of the Self and the Arrows of Volition and Self-Representation. American Journal of Bioethics 9 (1):46 – 47.score: 6.0
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  41. S. R. Coleman & Sandra Webster (forthcoming). The Problem of Volition and the Conditioned Reflex. Part II. Voluntary-Responding Subjects, 1951-1980. Behaviorism.score: 6.0
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  42. G. N. A. Vesey (1961). Volition. Philosophy 36 (138):352 - 365.score: 6.0
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  43. Kenneth P. Winkler (1985). Berkeley on Volition, Power, and the Complexity of Causation. History of Philosophy Quarterly 2 (1):53 - 69.score: 6.0
  44. A. Bain (1891). Notes on Volition. Mind 16 (62):253-258.score: 6.0
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  45. Gilles Lafargue & Nicolas Franck (2009). Effort Awareness and Sense of Volition in Schizophrenia. Consciousness and Cognition 18 (1):277-289.score: 6.0
  46. R. F. A. Hoernlé (1927). Broad and Hume on Causation and Volition. Journal of Philosophy 24 (2):29-36.score: 6.0
  47. Charles Ripley (1974). A Theory of Volition. American Philosophical Quarterly 11 (2):141 - 147.score: 6.0
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  48. Jon C. Horvitz (2002). Dopamine, Parkinson's Disease, and Volition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):586-586.score: 6.0
    Disruptions in dopamine transmission within the basal ganglia (BG) produce deficits in voluntary actions, that is, in the interface between cortically-generated goal representation and BG-mediated response selection. Under conditions of dopamine loss in humans and other animals, responses are impaired when they require internal generation, but are relatively intact when elicited by external stimuli.
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  49. Thomas Keutner (1987). David Hume and the Concept of Volition: Introduction. Hume Studies 13 (2):275-275.score: 6.0
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