Search results for '*Word Meaning' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Timothy Pritchard (2013). Locke and the Primary Signification of Words: An Approach to Word Meaning. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):486-506.score: 240.0
    Locke’s claim that the primary signification of (most) words is an idea, or complex of ideas, has received different interpretations. I support the majority view that Locke’s notion of primary signification can be construed in terms of linguistic meaning. But this reading has been seen as making Locke’s account vulnerable to various criticisms, of which I consider two. First, it appears to make the account vulnerable to the charge that an idea cannot play the role that a word (...) should play. I argue that the role Locke actually gives to signified ideas is not susceptible to this criticism. Second, it appears to make Locke guilty of at least some degree of semantic idealism. I argue that Locke is not guilty of this and that he makes a proper distinction between the non-referential relation that holds between a word and its primary signification and the referential relation that holds between a word and things the word is used to speak about. (shrink)
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  2. Lynne C. Nygaard, Debora S. Herold & Laura L. Namy (2009). The Semantics of Prosody: Acoustic and Perceptual Evidence of Prosodic Correlates to Word Meaning. Cognitive Science 33 (1):127-146.score: 210.0
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  3. Pierrette Bouillon & Federica Busa (eds.) (2001). The Language of Word Meaning. Cambridge University Press.score: 180.0
    This volume is a collection of original contributions from outstanding scholars in linguistics, philosophy and computational linguistics exploring the relation between word meaning and human linguistic creativity. The papers present different aspects surrounding the question of what is word meaning, a problem that has been the center of heated debate in all those disciplines that directly or indirectly are concerned with the study of language and of human cognition. The discussions are centered around the newly emerging view of (...)
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  4. Alison F. Garton (2001). Word Meaning, Cognitive Development, and Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1106-1106.score: 180.0
    This review proposes that Bloom's linkage of word meaning with more general cognitive capacities could be extended through examination of the social contexts in which children learn. Specifically, the child's developing theory of mind can be viewed as part of the process by which children learn word meanings through engagement in social interactions that facilitate both language and strategic behaviours.
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  5. Manuela Ungureanu (2013). Experiences of Word Meaning. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):15-26.score: 180.0
    I focus on Barry C. Smith’s investigations in the phenomenology of speech, and on his ambitious, unified theory of both sub-personal and first-personal linguistic knowledge (2008, 2009). I argue that empirical hypotheses about our awareness of word meaning challenge the starting points of his phenomenology of speech, as they require both (1) modifications of his proposed theory of speakers experiences of word meaning, and (2) clarifications of what the phenomenology of speech teaches us and why.
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  6. Thomas K. Landauer (1999). Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA), a Disembodied Learning Machine, Acquires Human Word Meaning Vicariously From Language Alone. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):624-625.score: 174.0
    The hypothesis that perceptual mechanisms could have more representational and logical power than usually assumed is interesting and provocative, especially with regard to brain evolution. However, the importance of embodiment and grounding is exaggerated, and the implication that there is no highly abstract representation at all, and that human-like knowledge cannot be learned or represented without human bodies, is very doubtful. A machine-learning model, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) that closely mimics human word and passage meaning relations is offered as (...)
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  7. Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil (2014). Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect. Cognitive Science 38 (6).score: 168.0
    Children and adults may not realize how much they depend on external sources in understanding word meanings. Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a “Misplaced Meaning” (MM) effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that children and adults show a highly consistent MM effect, and that it is stronger in young children. (...)
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  8. Howard R. Pollio (1963). Word Association as a Function of Conditioned Meaning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (5):454-460.score: 168.0
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  9. Stevan Harnad, Learning Word Meaning From Dictionary Definitions: Sensorimotor Induction Precedes Verbal Instruction.score: 164.0
    Almost all words are the names of categories. We can learn most of our words (and hence our categories) from dictionary definitions, but not all of them. Some have to be learned from direct experience. To understand a word from its definition we need to already understand the words used in the definition. This is the “Symbol Grounding Problem” [1]. How many words (and which ones) do we need to ground directly in sensorimotor experience in order to be able to (...)
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  10. Chris Westbury & Elena Nicoladis (2001). A Multiplicity of Constraints: How Children Learn Word Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1122-1123.score: 158.0
    This book is an excellent and accessible overview of the position that children learn the meanings of words by applying a variety of nonlinguistic cognitive tools to the problem. We take issue with Bloom's emphasis on Theory of Mind as an explanatory mechanism for language learning; and with his claim that only unitary objects are nameable.
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  11. N. Carston, Metaphor, Ad Hoc Concepts and Word Meaning - More Questions Than Answers.score: 150.0
    Recent work in relevance-theoretic pragmatics develops the idea that understanding verbal utterances involves processes of ad hoc concept construction. The resulting concepts may be narrower or looser than the lexical concepts which provide the input to the process. Two of the many issues that arise are considered in this paper: (a) the applicability of the idea to the understanding of metaphor, and (b) the extent to which lexical forms are appropriately thought of as encoding concepts.
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  12. Thomas D. Bontly (2005). Modified Occam's Razor: Parsimony, Pragmatics, and the Acquisition of Word Meaning. Mind and Language 20 (3):288–312.score: 150.0
    Advocates of linguistic pragmatics often appeal to a principle which Paul Grice called Modified Occam's Razor: 'Senses are not to be multiplied beyond necessity'. Superficially, Grice's principle seems a routine application of the principle of parsimony ('Entities are not to be multiplied beyond necessity'). But parsimony arguments, though common in science, are notoriously problematic, and their use by Griceans faces numerous objections. This paper argues that Modified Occam's Razor makes considerably more sense in light of certain assumptions about the processes (...)
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  13. Mark Siderits (1985). Word Meaning, Sentence Meaning, and Apoha. Journal of Indian Philosophy 13 (2):133-151.score: 150.0
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  14. Jane Heal (1979). Sentence Meaning and Word Meaning--I. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (115):97-110.score: 150.0
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  15. Timothy Pritchard (2012). Meaning, Signification, and Suggestion: Berkeley on General Words. History of Philosophy Quarterly 29 (3):301-317.score: 150.0
    Discussion of Berkeley’s theory of language has largely ignored what he says about the ‘meaning’ of a general word. Berkeley distinguishes the meaning of a general word both from the extension of the word and from what the word might suggest in the mind of the language user. D. Flage has argued that Berkeley has an ‘extensional’ theory of meaning, but this is based on passages where Berkeley does not speak of word meaning. When Berkeley explicitly (...)
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  16. E. J. Borowski (1979). Sentence Meaning and Word Meaning-II. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (115):111-124.score: 150.0
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  17. Michael Snodgrass, Howard Shevrin & Michael Kopka (1993). The Mediation of Intentional Judgments by Unconscious Perceptions: The Influences of Task Strategy, Task Preference, Word Meaning, and Motivation. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):169-193.score: 150.0
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  18. Mutsumi Imai & Dedre Gentner (1997). A Cross-Linguistic Study of Early Word Meaning: Universal Ontology and Linguistic Influence. Cognition 62 (2):169-200.score: 150.0
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  19. Tim Kenyon (1999). Non-Sentential Assertions and the Dependence Thesis of Word Meaning. Mind and Language 14 (4):424–440.score: 150.0
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  20. Jeannette Littlemore & Fiona MacArthur (2012). Figurative Extensions of Word Meaning: How Do Corpus Data and Intuition Match Up? In Dagmar Divjak & Stefan Thomas Gries (eds.), Frequency Effects in Language Representation. De Gruyter Mouton. 195--233.score: 150.0
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  21. Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1991). Ontological Categories Guide Young Children's Inductions of Word Meaning: Object Terms and Substance Terms. Cognition 38 (2):179-211.score: 150.0
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  22. Bādarāyaṇa (1999). Brahma Sutras: Text, Word-to-Word Meaning, Translation, and Commentary. Islamic Books.score: 150.0
    Aphoristic work, with translation and commentary on Vedanta philosophy.
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  23. Johannes Engelkamp (1992). Word Meaning, Imagery and Action. In. In Maksim Stamenov (ed.), Current Advances in Semantic Theory. J. Benjamins Pub. Co.. 73--129.score: 150.0
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  24. Lawrence Moonan (1976). Word Meaning. Philosophy 51 (196):195 - 207.score: 150.0
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  25. Milena Rabovsky & Ken McRae (2014). Simulating the N400 ERP Component as Semantic Network Error: Insights From a Feature-Based Connectionist Attractor Model of Word Meaning. Cognition 132 (1):68-89.score: 150.0
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  26. F. Guenthner (1983). Review: David R. Dowty, Word Meaning and Montague Grammar. The Semantics of Verbs and Times in Generative Semantics and in Montague's PTQ. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (2):501-502.score: 150.0
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  27. Bernard Harrison (1986). Word Meaning and Belief. Philosophical Books 27 (1):45-47.score: 150.0
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  28. Falk Huettig & Gerry Altmann (2005). Word Meaning and the Control of Eye Fixation: Semantic Competitor Effects and the Visual World Paradigm. Cognition 96 (1):23-32.score: 150.0
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  29. Ken McRae, Virginia R. de Sa & Mark S. Seidenberg (1997). On the Nature and Scope of Featural Representations of Word Meaning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 126 (2).score: 150.0
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  30. Laura Michaelis (2003). Word Meaning, Sentence Meaning, and Syntactic Meaning. In H. Cuyckens, René Dirven & John R. Taylor (eds.), Cognitive Approaches to Lexical Semantics. Mouton de Gruyter. 163--209.score: 150.0
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  31. Schecker M. (2009). The Influence of Word Meaning on Central Auditory Processing Indicated by Late MMN. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 150.0
  32. Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1993). Ontological Categories Guide Young Children's Inductions of Word Meaning. In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: Mit Press.score: 150.0
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  33. Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1992). Perception, Ontology, and Word Meaning. Cognition 45 (1):101-107.score: 150.0
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  34. Michael W. L. Chee (2006). Dissociating Language and Word Meaning in the Bilingual Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (12):527-529.score: 150.0
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  35. Chinmayananda (1997). Discourses on Aṣṭāvakra Gītā: Original Upaniṣad Text in Devanāgrī with Transliteration in Roman Letters, Word-for-Word Meaning in Text Order with Translation and Commentary. Central Chinmaya Mission Trust.score: 150.0
     
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  36. M. Imai & D. Gentner (1997). A Crosslinguistic Study on Constraints on Early Word Meaning: Linguistic Influence Vs. Universal Ontology. Cognition 62:169-200.score: 150.0
     
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  37. Īśvarakr̥ṣṇa (1995). Sāṁkhya Kārika of Īśvara Kr̥ṣṇa: With the Tattva Kaumudī of Śrī Vācaspati Miśra ; with Sanskrit Text of the Kārikā, Transliteration and Word-for-Word Meaning, and a Free Rendering Into English of the Tattva Kaumudi with Notes. Sri Ramakrishna Math.score: 150.0
     
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  38. Diane Pecher, Saskia Van Dantzig, Inge Boot, Kiki Zanolie & David E. Huber (2010). Congruency Between Word Position and Meaning is Caused by Task-Induced Spatial Attention. Frontiers in Psychology 1:30-30.score: 144.0
    We report an experiment that compared two explanations for the effect of congruency between a word’s on screen spatial position and its meaning. On one account, congruency is explained by the match between position and a mental simulation of meaning. Alternatively, congruency is explained by the polarity alignment principle. To distinguish between these accounts we presented the same object names (e.g., shark, helicopter) in a sky decision task or an ocean decision task, such that response polarity and typical (...)
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  39. Catriona Silvey, Simon Kirby & Kenny Smith (2014). Word Meanings Evolve to Selectively Preserve Distinctions on Salient Dimensions. Cognitive Science 38 (6).score: 136.0
    Words refer to objects in the world, but this correspondence is not one-to-one: Each word has a range of referents that share features on some dimensions but differ on others. This property of language is called underspecification. Parts of the lexicon have characteristic patterns of underspecification; for example, artifact nouns tend to specify shape, but not color, whereas substance nouns specify material but not shape. These regularities in the lexicon enable learners to generalize new words appropriately. How does the lexicon (...)
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  40. R. L. Abrams & Anthony G. Greenwald (2000). Parts Outweigh the Whole (Word) in Unconscious Analysis of Meaning. Psychological Science 11 (2):118-124.score: 132.0
  41. Michael Storck (2010). The Meaning of the Word Art. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:263-273.score: 132.0
    In this paper I investigate how works of fine art differ from products of craft. I argue that historical and institutional definitions are incomplete becausethey fail to explain what is common to everything we call art. I then consider the way in which Francis J. Kovach and Jacques Maritain define art. I argue thatKovach’s four-fold division fails on logical grounds. Maritain’s division, however, makes the distinction between fine and useful art a matter of degree, not a division into separate species. (...)
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  42. Benson Schaeffer & Richard Wallace (1970). The Comparison of Word Meanings. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (2):144.score: 130.0
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  43. Sam Scott (2001). The Other Way to Learn the Meaning of a Word. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1117-1118.score: 126.0
    Bloom's book can be viewed as a long argument for an anti-Whorfian conclusion. According to Bloom, word learning is usually a process of mapping new words to pre-existing concepts. But an exception to this generalization – the learning of words from linguistic context – poses a problem for Bloom's anti-Whorfian argument.
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  44. M. S. Barbieri & A. Devescovi (1985). Explaining a Word to a Child: Lexical Meaning in Natural Interaction. In G. A. J. Hoppenbrouwers, Pieter A. M. Seuren & A. J. M. M. Weijters (eds.), Meaning and the Lexicon. Foris Publications. 370--379.score: 126.0
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  45. James Risser (2007). Saying and Hearing the Word: Language and the Experience of Meaning in Gadamer's Hermeneutics. In B. K. Dalai (ed.), Ultimate Reality and Meaning. Centre of Advanced Study in Sanskrit, University of Pune. 30--2.score: 126.0
     
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  46. Jacques Bouveresse (2004). On the Meaning of the Word 'Platonism' in the Expression 'Mathematical Platonism'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):55–79.score: 122.0
    The expression 'platonism in mathematics' or 'mathematical platonism' is familiar in the philosophy of mathematics at least since the use Paul Bernays made of it in his paper of 1934, 'Sur le Platonisme dans les Mathématiques'. But he was not the first to point out the similarities between the conception of the defenders of mathematical realism and the ideas of Plato. Poincaré had already stressed the 'platonistic' orientation of the mathematicians he called'Cantorian', as opposed to those who (like himself) were (...)
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  47. Jacques Bouveresse (2005). III *-on the Meaning of the Word 'Platonism' in the Expression 'Mathematical Platonism'. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 105 (1):55-79.score: 122.0
    The expression 'platonism in mathematics' or 'mathematical platonism' is familiar in the philosophy of mathematics at least since the use Paul Bernays made of it in his paper of 1934, 'Sur le Platonisme dans les Math?matiques'. But he was not the first to point out the similarities between the conception of the defenders of mathematical realism and the ideas of Plato. Poincar? had already stressed the 'platonistic' orientation of the mathematicians he called 'Cantorian', as opposed to those who (like himself) (...)
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  48. Douglas R. Hofstadter (1982). Who Shoves Whom Around Inside the Careenium? Or What is the Meaning of the Word “I”? Synthese 53 (2):189-218.score: 120.0
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  49. Douglas R. Hofstadter (1982). Who Shoves Whom Around Inside the Careenium? Or What Is the Meaning of the Word "I"? The Achilles Symbol and the Tortoise Symbol Encounter Each Other Inside the Author's Cranium. Synthese 53 (2):189 - 218.score: 120.0
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  50. Rupert Read (2000). What 'There Can Be No Such Thing as Meaning Anything by Any Word' Could Possibly Mean. In Alice Crary & Rupert Read (eds.), The New Wittgenstein. Routledge.score: 120.0
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