Search results for '*Word Meaning' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  22
    Timothy Pritchard (2013). Locke and the Primary Signification of Words: An Approach to Word Meaning. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):486-506.
    Locke’s claim that the primary signification of (most) words is an idea, or complex of ideas, has received different interpretations. I support the majority view that Locke’s notion of primary signification can be construed in terms of linguistic meaning. But this reading has been seen as making Locke’s account vulnerable to various criticisms, of which I consider two. First, it appears to make the account vulnerable to the charge that an idea cannot play the role that a word (...) should play. I argue that the role Locke actually gives to signified ideas is not susceptible to this criticism. Second, it appears to make Locke guilty of at least some degree of semantic idealism. I argue that Locke is not guilty of this and that he makes a proper distinction between the non-referential relation that holds between a word and its primary signification and the referential relation that holds between a word and things the word is used to speak about. (shrink)
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  2.  12
    Lynne C. Nygaard, Debora S. Herold & Laura L. Namy (2009). The Semantics of Prosody: Acoustic and Perceptual Evidence of Prosodic Correlates to Word Meaning. Cognitive Science 33 (1):127-146.
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  3.  5
    Ołena Łucyszyna (2016). Classical Sāṁkhya on the Relationship Between a Word and Its Meaning. Journal of Indian Philosophy 44 (2):303-323.
    The aim of this article is to reconstruct the classical Sāṁkhya view on the relationship between a word and its meaning. The study embraces all the extant texts of classical Sāṁkhya, but it is based mainly on the Yuktidīpikā, since this commentary contains most of the fragments which are directly related to the topic of our research. The textual analysis has led me to the following conclusion. It is possible to reconstruct two different and conflicting views on the relationship (...)
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  4.  7
    Michael Snodgrass, Howard Shevrin & Michael Kopka (1993). The Mediation of Intentional Judgments by Unconscious Perceptions: The Influences of Task Strategy, Task Preference, Word Meaning, and Motivation. Consciousness and Cognition 2 (3):169-193.
    In two experiments subjects attempted to identify words presented below the objective threshold using two task strategies emphasizing either allowing a word to pop into their heads or looking carefully at the stimulus field . Words were selected to represent both meaningful and structural dimensions. We also asked subjects to indicate their strategy preference and to rate their motivation to perform well. In the absence of conscious perception, both strategy preference and word meaning interacted with strategy condition, mediating the (...)
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  5.  37
    Pierrette Bouillon & Federica Busa (eds.) (2001). The Language of Word Meaning. Cambridge University Press.
    This volume is a collection of original contributions from outstanding scholars in linguistics, philosophy and computational linguistics exploring the relation between word meaning and human linguistic creativity. The papers present different aspects surrounding the question of what is word meaning, a problem that has been the center of heated debate in all those disciplines that directly or indirectly are concerned with the study of language and of human cognition. The discussions are centered around the newly emerging view of (...)
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  6.  15
    Manuela Ungureanu (2013). Experiences of Word Meaning. Dialogue and Universalism 23 (1):15-26.
    I focus on Barry C. Smith’s investigations in the phenomenology of speech, and on his ambitious, unified theory of both sub-personal and first-personal linguistic knowledge (2008, 2009). I argue that empirical hypotheses about our awareness of word meaning challenge the starting points of his phenomenology of speech, as they require both (1) modifications of his proposed theory of speakers experiences of word meaning, and (2) clarifications of what the phenomenology of speech teaches us and why.
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  7.  2
    Kimberly Wei Yi Tao (2016). Exploring the Sources of Authority Over the Word Meaning in Transgender Jurisprudence. International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 29 (1):29-44.
    This paper looks at transgender identities and the law in the context of marriage in common law jurisdictions. It particularly focuses on the nature and sources of authority over word meaning as well as the role of language and definition in classifying transgender individuals into a legal category. When it comes to the legal question of who may marry whom, and what the terms “man” and “woman” actually refer to, there is no statutory definition of the terms “man”, “woman”, (...)
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  8.  18
    Alison F. Garton (2001). Word Meaning, Cognitive Development, and Social Interaction. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1106-1106.
    This review proposes that Bloom's linkage of word meaning with more general cognitive capacities could be extended through examination of the social contexts in which children learn. Specifically, the child's developing theory of mind can be viewed as part of the process by which children learn word meanings through engagement in social interactions that facilitate both language and strategic behaviours.
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  9.  13
    Thomas K. Landauer (1999). Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA), a Disembodied Learning Machine, Acquires Human Word Meaning Vicariously From Language Alone. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):624-625.
    The hypothesis that perceptual mechanisms could have more representational and logical power than usually assumed is interesting and provocative, especially with regard to brain evolution. However, the importance of embodiment and grounding is exaggerated, and the implication that there is no highly abstract representation at all, and that human-like knowledge cannot be learned or represented without human bodies, is very doubtful. A machine-learning model, Latent Semantic Analysis (LSA) that closely mimics human word and passage meaning relations is offered as (...)
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  10.  1
    Howard R. Pollio (1963). Word Association as a Function of Conditioned Meaning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 66 (5):454-460.
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  11.  8
    Jonathan F. Kominsky & Frank C. Keil (2014). Overestimation of Knowledge About Word Meanings: The “Misplaced Meaning” Effect. Cognitive Science 38 (8):1604-1633.
    Children and adults may not realize how much they depend on external sources in understanding word meanings. Four experiments investigated the existence and developmental course of a “Misplaced Meaning” effect, wherein children and adults overestimate their knowledge about the meanings of various words by underestimating how much they rely on outside sources to determine precise reference. Studies 1 and 2 demonstrate that children and adults show a highly consistent MM effect, and that it is stronger in young children. Study (...)
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  12.  2
    David R. Dowty (1982). Word Meaning and Montague Grammar. Philosophical Review 91 (2):290-295.
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  13.  30
    Stevan Harnad, Learning Word Meaning From Dictionary Definitions: Sensorimotor Induction Precedes Verbal Instruction.
    Almost all words are the names of categories. We can learn most of our words (and hence our categories) from dictionary definitions, but not all of them. Some have to be learned from direct experience. To understand a word from its definition we need to already understand the words used in the definition. This is the “Symbol Grounding Problem” [1]. How many words (and which ones) do we need to ground directly in sensorimotor experience in order to be able to (...)
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  14.  6
    Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1991). Ontological Categories Guide Young Children's Inductions of Word Meaning: Object Terms and Substance Terms. Cognition 38 (2):179-211.
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  15.  6
    Ken McRae, Virginia R. de Sa & Mark S. Seidenberg (1997). On the Nature and Scope of Featural Representations of Word Meaning. Journal of Experimental Psychology 126 (2).
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  16. H. P. Grice (1968). Utterer's Meaning, Sentence-Meaning, and Word-Meaning. Foundations of Language 4 (3):225-242.
     
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  17.  14
    Falk Huettig & Gerry Altmann (2005). Word Meaning and the Control of Eye Fixation: Semantic Competitor Effects and the Visual World Paradigm. Cognition 96 (1):23-32.
  18.  20
    Mutsumi Imai & Dedre Gentner (1997). A Cross-Linguistic Study of Early Word Meaning: Universal Ontology and Linguistic Influence. Cognition 62 (2):169-200.
  19.  67
    Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1992). Perception, Ontology, and Word Meaning. Cognition 45 (1):101-107.
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  20.  3
    David R. Dowty (1983). Word Meaning and Montague Grammar. The Semantics of Verbs and Times in Generative Semantics and in Montague's PTQ. Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (2):501-502.
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  21.  8
    Milena Rabovsky & Ken McRae (2014). Simulating the N400 ERP Component as Semantic Network Error: Insights From a Feature-Based Connectionist Attractor Model of Word Meaning. Cognition 132 (1):68-89.
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  22.  60
    Thomas D. Bontly (2005). Modified Occam's Razor: Parsimony, Pragmatics, and the Acquisition of Word Meaning. Mind and Language 20 (3):288–312.
    Advocates of linguistic pragmatics often appeal to a principle which Paul Grice called Modified Occam's Razor: 'Senses are not to be multiplied beyond necessity'. Superficially, Grice's principle seems a routine application of the principle of parsimony ('Entities are not to be multiplied beyond necessity'). But parsimony arguments, though common in science, are notoriously problematic, and their use by Griceans faces numerous objections. This paper argues that Modified Occam's Razor makes considerably more sense in light of certain assumptions about the processes (...)
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  23.  3
    Jamie Reilly, Jinyi Hung & Chris Westbury (2016). Non‐Arbitrariness in Mapping Word Form to Meaning: Cross‐Linguistic Formal Markers of Word Concreteness. Cognitive Science 40 (4):n/a-n/a.
    Arbitrary symbolism is a linguistic doctrine that predicts an orthogonal relationship between word forms and their corresponding meanings. Recent corpora analyses have demonstrated violations of arbitrary symbolism with respect to concreteness, a variable characterizing the sensorimotor salience of a word. In addition to qualitative semantic differences, abstract and concrete words are also marked by distinct morphophonological structures such as length and morphological complexity. Native English speakers show sensitivity to these markers in tasks such as auditory word recognition and naming. One (...)
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  24. Robyn Carston, Metaphor, Ad Hoc Concepts and Word Meaning - More Questions Than Answers.
    Recent work in relevance-theoretic pragmatics develops the idea that understanding verbal utterances involves processes of ad hoc concept construction. The resulting concepts may be narrower or looser than the lexical concepts which provide the input to the process. Two of the many issues that arise are considered in this paper: (a) the applicability of the idea to the understanding of metaphor, and (b) the extent to which lexical forms are appropriately thought of as encoding concepts.
     
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  25.  14
    Michael W. L. Chee (2006). Dissociating Language and Word Meaning in the Bilingual Brain. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 10 (12):527-529.
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  26.  45
    Mark Siderits (1985). Word Meaning, Sentence Meaning, and Apoha. Journal of Indian Philosophy 13 (2):133-151.
  27.  14
    Laura Michaelis (2003). Word Meaning, Sentence Meaning, and Syntactic Meaning. In H. Cuyckens, René Dirven & John R. Taylor (eds.), Cognitive Approaches to Lexical Semantics. Mouton de Gruyter 163--209.
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  28.  2
    Nancy N. Soja, Susan Carey & Elizabeth S. Spelke (1993). Ontological Categories Guide Young Children's Inductions of Word Meaning. In Alvin Goldman (ed.), Readings in Philosophy and Cognitive Science. Cambridge: MIT Press
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  29.  4
    Tim Kenyon (1999). Non-Sentential Assertions and the Dependence Thesis of Word Meaning. Mind and Language 14 (4):424–440.
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  30.  28
    Jane Heal (1979). Sentence Meaning and Word Meaning--I. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (115):97-110.
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  31.  8
    Jeannette Littlemore & Fiona MacArthur (2012). Figurative Extensions of Word Meaning: How Do Corpus Data and Intuition Match Up? In Dagmar Divjak & Stefan Thomas Gries (eds.), Frequency Effects in Language Representation. De Gruyter Mouton 195--233.
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  32.  24
    E. J. Borowski (1979). Sentence Meaning and Word Meaning-II. Philosophical Quarterly 29 (115):111-124.
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  33.  23
    Chris Westbury & Elena Nicoladis (2001). A Multiplicity of Constraints: How Children Learn Word Meaning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1122-1123.
    This book is an excellent and accessible overview of the position that children learn the meanings of words by applying a variety of nonlinguistic cognitive tools to the problem. We take issue with Bloom's emphasis on Theory of Mind as an explanatory mechanism for language learning; and with his claim that only unitary objects are nameable.
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  34.  4
    Bernard Harrison (1986). Word Meaning and Belief. Philosophical Books 27 (1):45-47.
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  35.  3
    Lawrence Moonan (1976). Word Meaning. Philosophy 51 (196):195 - 207.
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  36. Johannes Engelkamp (1992). Word Meaning, Imagery and Action. In Maksim Stamenov (ed.), Current Advances in Semantic Theory. J. Benjamins Pub. Co. 73--129.
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  37. F. Guenthner (1983). Review: David R. Dowty, Word Meaning and Montague Grammar. The Semantics of Verbs and Times in Generative Semantics and in Montague's PTQ. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 48 (2):501-502.
     
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  38.  9
    Bādarāyaṇa (1999). Brahma Sutras: Text, Word-to-Word Meaning, Translation, and Commentary. Islamic Books.
    Aphoristic work, with translation and commentary on Vedanta philosophy.
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  39. Chinmayananda (1997). Discourses on Aṣṭāvakra Gītā: Original Upaniṣad Text in Devanāgrī with Transliteration in Roman Letters, Word-for-Word Meaning in Text Order with Translation and Commentary. Central Chinmaya Mission Trust.
     
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  40. Alberto Cortes (1973). Frege On Sentence Making Vs Word Meaning. Southwest Philosophical Studies.
     
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  41. M. Imai & D. Gentner (1997). A Crosslinguistic Study on Constraints on Early Word Meaning: Linguistic Influence Vs. Universal Ontology. Cognition 62:169-200.
     
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  42. Īśvarakr̥ṣṇa (1995). Sāṁkhya Kārika of Īśvara Kr̥ṣṇa: With the Tattva Kaumudī of Śrī Vācaspati Miśra ; with Sanskrit Text of the Kārikā, Transliteration and Word-for-Word Meaning, and a Free Rendering Into English of the Tattva Kaumudi with Notes. Sri Ramakrishna Math.
     
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  43. Eun-su Cho (1997). Language and Meaning: Buddhist Interpretations of "the Buddha's Word" in Indian and Chinese Perspectives. Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    This is a comparative study of the discourses on the nature of sacred language found in Indian Abhidharma texts and their counterparts by seventh century Chinese Buddhist scholars who, unlike the Indian Buddhists, questioned "the essence of the Buddha's teaching," and developed intellectual dialogues through their texts. ;In the Indian Abhidharma texts, Sa ngitiparyaya, Jnanaprasthana, Mahavibhasa, Abhidharmakosa, and Nyayanusara, the nature of the Buddha's word was either "sound," the oral component of speech, or "name," the component of language that conveys (...)
     
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  44.  8
    Barry J. Devereux, Kirsten I. Taylor, Billi Randall, Jeroen Geertzen & Lorraine K. Tyler (2016). Feature Statistics Modulate the Activation of Meaning During Spoken Word Processing. Cognitive Science 40 (2):325-350.
    Understanding spoken words involves a rapid mapping from speech to conceptual representations. One distributed feature-based conceptual account assumes that the statistical characteristics of concepts’ features—the number of concepts they occur in and likelihood of co-occurrence —determine conceptual activation. To test these claims, we investigated the role of distinctiveness/sharedness and correlational strength in speech-to-meaning mapping, using a lexical decision task and computational simulations. Responses were faster for concepts with higher sharedness, suggesting that shared features are facilitatory in tasks like lexical (...)
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  45.  27
    R. L. Abrams & Anthony G. Greenwald (2000). Parts Outweigh the Whole (Word) in Unconscious Analysis of Meaning. Psychological Science 11 (2):118-124.
  46.  22
    Sam Scott (2001). The Other Way to Learn the Meaning of a Word. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (6):1117-1118.
    Bloom's book can be viewed as a long argument for an anti-Whorfian conclusion. According to Bloom, word learning is usually a process of mapping new words to pre-existing concepts. But an exception to this generalization – the learning of words from linguistic context – poses a problem for Bloom's anti-Whorfian argument.
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  47.  11
    Michael Storck (2010). The Meaning of the Word Art. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 84:263-273.
    In this paper I investigate how works of fine art differ from products of craft. I argue that historical and institutional definitions are incomplete becausethey fail to explain what is common to everything we call art. I then consider the way in which Francis J. Kovach and Jacques Maritain define art. I argue thatKovach’s four-fold division fails on logical grounds. Maritain’s division, however, makes the distinction between fine and useful art a matter of degree, not a division into separate species. (...)
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  48. M. S. Barbieri & A. Devescovi (1985). Explaining a Word to a Child: Lexical Meaning in Natural Interaction. In G. A. J. Hoppenbrouwers, Pieter A. M. Seuren & A. J. M. M. Weijters (eds.), Meaning and the Lexicon. Foris Publications 370--379.
     
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  49. James Risser (2007). Saying and Hearing the Word: Language and the Experience of Meaning in Gadamer's Hermeneutics. In B. K. Dalai (ed.), Ultimate Reality and Meaning. Centre of Advanced Study in Sanskrit, University of Pune 30--2.
     
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  50. Lynne C. Nygaard, Allison E. Cook & Laura L. Namy (2009). Sound to Meaning Correspondences Facilitate Word Learning. Cognition 112 (1):181-186.
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