Search results for '1984, Orwell' (try it on Scholar)

19 found
Order:
  1. Douglas Kellner, From 1984 to One-Dimensional Man: Critical Reflections on Orwell and Marcuse.
    Occasionally literary and philosophical metaphors and images enter the domain of popular discourse and consciousness. Images in Uncle Tom's Cabin of humane and oppressed blacks contrasted (...)to inhumane slave owners and overseers shaped many people's negative images of slavery. And in nineteenth century Russia, Chernyshevsky's novel What is to be Done? shaped a generation of young Russian's views of oppressive features of their society, including V.I. Lenin who took the question posed by Chernyshevsky's novel as the title of one of his early revolutionary treatises. In the twentieth century, George Orwell's vision of totalitarian society in his novel 1984 has had a major impact on how many people see, understand, and talk about contemporary social trends. {1} Subsequently, Herbert Marcuse's analyses and images of a "onedimensional man" in a "one-dimensional society" shaped many young radicals' ways of seeing and experiencing life in advanced capitalist society during the 1960s and 1970s --though to a more limited extent and within more restricted circles than Orwell's writings which are among the most widely read and discussed works of the century. (shrink)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2.  26
    Steven Blakemore (1984). Language and Ideology in Orwell's 1984. Social Theory and Practice 10 (3):349-356.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3.  5
    Patricia Hill (1984). Religion and Myth in Orwell's 1984. Social Theory and Practice 10 (3):273-287.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4.  18
    Peter S. Wenz (1986). The Critique of Berkeley's Empiricism In Orwell's 1984. Idealistic Studies 16 (2):133-152.
  5.  23
    Valerie J. Simms (1974). A Reconsideration of Orwell's 1984: The Moral Implications of Despair. Ethics 84 (4):292-306.
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6.  1
    D. P. Leinster Mackay (1985). Some Etonian Thoughts and Contrary Imaginations: Thring (1884) and Orwell (1984). British Journal of Educational Studies 33 (1):70 - 85.
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7.  2
    Dp Leinster Mackay (1985). Some Etonian Thoughts and Contrary Imaginations: Thring (1884) and Orwell (1984). British Journal of Educational Studies 33 (1):70-85.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8.  1
    Dp Leinster & Western Australia (1985). Some Etonian Thoughts and Contrary Imaginations: Thring (1884) and Orwell (1984). British Journal of Educational Studies 33 (1):70-85.
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9.  0
    Jay Bergman (1998). Reading Fiction to Understand the Soviet UnionSoviet Dissidents on Orwell’s 1984. History of European Ideas 23 (5-6):173-192.
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. Corey Abel (2003). Love and Friendship in Utopia: Brave New World and 1984. In Eduardo Velasquez (ed.), Love and Friendship: Rethinking Politics and Affection in Modern Times.
    Contrary to many "political" interpretations, of "Brave New World" and "1984" this paper stresses that the evil of totalitarian government is not simply in the presence of great and arbitrary power, but in the particular ways that such power erodes love and friendship, the bases of social life. The crisis represented by the destruction of all possibility of love and friendship is placed in the context of Dostoevsky's meditations on "The Grand Inquisitor," and reflections by noted political theorists on the (...)
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Peter van Inwagen (2008). Was George Orwell a Metaphysical Realist? Philosophia Scientiae 12 (1):161-185.
    The core of George Orwell’s novel 1984 is the debate between Winston Smith and O’Brien in the cells of the Ministry of Love. It is natural to read this debate as a debate between a realist and an anti-realist. I offer a few representative passages from the book that demonstrate, I believe, that if this is not the only possible way to understand the debate, it is one very natural way.RésuméLe coeur de la nouvelle de George Orwell, 1984, (...)
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12.  61
    Charles R. Pigden (2010). Coercive Theories of Meaning or Why Language Shouldn't Matter (So Much) to Philosophy. Logique Et Analyse 53 (210):151.
    This paper is a critique of coercive theories of meaning, that is, theories (or criteria) of meaning designed to do down ones opponents by representing their views as meaningless or unintelligible. Many philosophers from Hobbes through Berkeley and Hume to the pragmatists, the logical positivists and (above all) Wittgenstein have devised such theories and criteria in order to discredit their opponents. I argue 1) that such theories and criteria are morally obnoxious, a) because they smack of the totalitarian linguistic tactics (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13.  1
    Fritz W. Schulze (1984). Imaginative Geschichts-,Prophetie' bei Huxley und Orwell. Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 36 (3):204-222.
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14.  13
    Stephen Jay Gould, The Return of Hopeful Monsters.
    Big Brother, the tyrant of George Orwell's 1984, directed his daily Two Minutes Hate against Emmanuel Goldstein, enemy of the people. When I studied evolutionary biology in graduate school during the mid-1960s, official rebuke and derision focused upon Richard Goldschmidt, a famous geneticist who, we were told, had gone astray. Although 1984 creeps up on us, I trust that the world will not be in Big Brother's grip by then. I do, however, predict that during this decade Goldschmidt will (...)
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  15.  88
    Alex Byrne & Michael Thau (1996). In Defence of the Hybrid View. Mind 105 (417):139-149.
    argument fails, and the purpose of this note is to bring out that failure. The view in question which Heck calls the Hybrid Vie~istinguishes between the meanings of names and the contents of beliefs which are expressible using names. According to the Hybrid View the meaning of a name is its referent: names do not have senses. Thus (a) "George Orwell wrote 1984" means the same as (b) "Eric Blair wrote 1984". However, the Hybrid View tells a different story (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16.  7
    Karen D. Hoffman (2004). Responses to Despair. Teaching Philosophy 27 (4):337-350.
    Whereas many philosophy courses focus upon the problem that skeptical doubts can play in knowledge claims, Kierkegaard suggests that the problem of despair is a much more significant as it encompasses not only the intellect but the entire person. This paper details this problem in the context of Kierkegaard’s “The Sickness Unto Death”, Camus’s “The Plague”, and Orwell’s “1984” . While the author discusses how this problem was broached in a seminar on Kierkegaard, themes of this course could be (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17.  29
    Stephen Jay Gould, Return of the Hopeful Monster.
    ig Brother, the tyrant of George Orwell's 1984, directed his daily Two Minutes Hate against Emmanuel Goldstein, enemy of the people. When I studied evolutionary biology in graduate school during the mid 1960s, official rebuke and derision focused upon Richard Goldschmidt , a famous geneticist who, we were told, had gone astray. Although 1984 creeps up on us, I trust that the world will not be in Big Brother's grip by then. I do, however, predict that during this decade (...)
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18.  1
    Steven Carter (2002). A Do-It-Yourself Dystopia: The Americanization of Big Brother. Upa.
    The essence of life in an oligarchy like George Orwell presents in '1984' is that freedom of choice is virtually non-existent. But what happens when so many trivial and meaningless choices inundate a culture such as our own and freedom itself becomes devalued? In 'A Do-It-Yourself Dystopia', through a variety of essays, Steven Carter addresses this and other issues in a wide-ranging search for hidden oligarchies of the American self.
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19.  0
    John Wilson (1982). ‘The Customary Meanings Of Words Were Changed’ – Or Were They? A Note On Thucydides 3.82.4. Classical Quarterly 32 (1):18-20.
    All editors and translators that I know of render the first part of this passage along the lines of ‘They changed the usual meanings of words‘. Thus Weil and Romilly talk of ‘le sens usuel des mots’,1 Stahl of ‘usitatam vocabulorum significationem’,2 Bloomfield of ‘the accustomed acceptation of names’;3 the most popular modern English translation gives ‘words... had to change their usual meanings’,4 and the best-known modern commentary the phrase in my title – ‘the customary meanings of words were changed’.5 (...)
    No categories
    Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography