Search results for 'A level philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Greg Dewar (2009). AS and A Level Religious Studies: Philosophy & Ethics Through Diagrams: Oxford Revision Guides. OUP Oxford.
    This series builds on the fact that pictures are easier to memorize than words. Each topic is summarized on a single page using annotated diagrams and concise notes with a full index for easy reference. -/- Expert authors have taken the content of the AS and A Level specifications and presented them in a refreshingly clear and concise format.
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  2.  6
    Trevor Eaton (1987). Teaching Philosophy at A-Level. Cogito 1 (2):21-22.
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  3.  2
    R. Scott Kretchmar (1980). Social Philosophy of Athletics: A Pluralistic and Practice-Oriented Philosophical Analysis of Top Level Amateur Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 7 (1):59-64.
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  4. Clinton J. Humbolt (1973). An Inquiry Into the Piagetian Tradition in America as a Basis for a Philosophy of Education at the Community College Level: A Quasi-Experimental Approach. [Washington,Educational Resources Information Center.
     
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  5. Kizel Arie (2016). Kizel, A. (2016). “Pedagogy Out of Fear of Philosophy as a Way of Pathologizing Children”. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning, Vol. 10, No. 20, Pp. 28 – 47. Journal of Unschooling and Alternative Learning 10 (20):28 – 47.
    The article conceptualizes the term Pedagogy of Fear as the master narrative of educational systems around the world. Pedagogy of Fear stunts the active and vital educational growth of the young person, making him/her passive and dependent upon external disciplinary sources. It is motivated by fear that prevents young students—as well as teachers—from dealing with the great existential questions that relate to the essence of human beings. One of the techniques of the Pedagogy of Fear is the internalization of the (...)
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  6.  1
    Michael Lacewing (2006). Revise Philosophy for as Level. Routledge.
    _Revise Philosophy for AS Level_ is the definitive revision guide for students of the Advanced Subsidiary level syllabus. Following the AQA syllabus, it helps students revise using past exam questions, examiner's reports, and tips on revision for the examination. Also included are a helpful glossary and annotated further reading. It covers all three units of the AS Level syllabus: Unit 1: Theory of Knowledge Unit 2: Moral Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion Unit 3: Texts. The (...)
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  7.  12
    Gerard Radnitzky (1974). Towards a System Philosophy of Scientific Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (3):369-398.
    Can research be studied in a way that is neither logical reconstruction nor empirical psychology or sociology of science? In contemporary philosophy of science this is usually denied—in spite of the recent 'paradigm shift' there. A system-philosophy approach in theory of research is outlined by means of some models : a research enterprise is viewed as a productive, innovative system, the research process as a transformation of complexes of knowledge-problems-instruments (software and hard ware). The direction this development takes (...)
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  8.  14
    Klaus M. Meyer-Abich (1979). Toward a Practical Philosophy of Nature. Environmental Ethics 1 (4):293-308.
    The application of the polluter-pays principle in environmental policy depends on answers to the philosophical questions about what is good or detrimental with respect to nature. Science and the economy constitute a functional circle of “observing” nature’s unity as well as its utility. Based on a concept of nature as a system of causally related objects or - complementary to this - as a bunch of “resources,” however, the human interest and responsibility in nature do not seem to be properly (...)
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  9. William Bechtel (2009). Constructing a Philosophy of Science of Cognitive Science. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):548-569.
    Philosophy of science is positioned to make distinctive contributions to cognitive science by providing perspective on its conceptual foundations and by advancing normative recommendations. The philosophy of science I embrace is naturalistic in that it is grounded in the study of actual science. Focusing on explanation, I describe the recent development of a mechanistic philosophy of science from which I draw three normative consequences for cognitive science. First, insofar as cognitive mechanisms are information-processing mechanisms, cognitive science needs (...)
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  10.  98
    Roberta L. Millstein (2006). Natural Selection as a Population-Level Causal Process. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (4):627-653.
    Recent discussions in the philosophy of biology have brought into question some fundamental assumptions regarding evolutionary processes, natural selection in particular. Some authors argue that natural selection is nothing but a population-level, statistical consequence of lower-level events (Matthen and Ariew [2002]; Walsh et al. [2002]). On this view, natural selection itself does not involve forces. Other authors reject this purely statistical, population-level account for an individual-level, causal account of natural selection (Bouchard and Rosenberg [2004]). I (...)
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  11.  2
    Joshua I. Weinstein (2015). Yishuv Medinah and a Rabbinic Alternative to Greek Political Philosophy. Journal of Jewish Thought and Philosophy 23 (2):161-195.
    _ Source: _Volume 23, Issue 2, pp 161 - 195 The Greek tradition of political philosophy, with its prominent focus on the forms of government, should be distinguished from the discourse typical of many rabbinic sources, with its concern for collective goals. This discourse commonly deploys broad, mid-level goals to mediate between abstract theology and practical law. Among these goals, yishuv medinah focuses on the economic and social development of a region or district, articulating the character of local (...)
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  12.  12
    Zhongjian Mou (2007). A Preliminary Discussion on Daoist Bionomy: On the Basis of Chen Yingning's Philosophy of Immortals. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):206-218.
    From the modern point of view, the Daoist regimen culture in China is actually a kind of oriental bionomy. Although it is less developed than the Western life sciences in terms of details and techniques, it has unique advantages in terms of its comprehensive grasp and dynamic observation of life, as well as its emphasis on the development of life potentiality and on the self adjustment and improvement of living bodies. Chen Yingning reestablished a Daoist bionomy through Xianxue 仙学 ( (...) of Immortals) which involves religious faith, philosophy and sciences, leaving us a valuable legacy. To establish a new bionomy system required by the modern society through learning from the Daoist bionomy, the academic circle has to seriously explore the four issues: (1) at the level of faith, to turn the Daoist faith in deities and gods into a pursuit of ideal personality; (2) with respect to the principles of regimen, to extend the dual cultivation into a kind of universal concept; (3) as with the way of regimen, to learn from the regimen thought of Daoism and combine the inner cultivation with the outer one, and static exercise with dynamic exercise; and (4) with regard to the ways of treatment of diseases, to combine the Daoist medicine with the Western medicine. (shrink)
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  13.  22
    Matthew Taylor (2007). Philosophy of Religion for as and A. Routledge.
    Endorsed by OCR for use with the OCR AS and A2 Religious Studies specifications. This tailor-made, up-to-date guide sets a new standard within the field. Written by an experienced teacher and edited by an experienced A-level examiner, this lively and student-friendly textbook strictly follows the OCR syllabus, covering all the areas integral to the course. Each chapter includes features such as explanations of key terminology, example examination questions, suggestions for activities and discussion, and recommended further reading. Philosophy of (...)
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  14.  84
    Steven French & Kerry McKenzie (2012). Thinking Outside the Toolbox: Towards a More Productive Engagement Between Metaphysics and Philosophy of Physics. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 8 (1):42-59.
    he relationship between metaphysics and science has recently become the focus of increased attention. Ladyman and Ross, in particular, have accused even naturalistically inclined metaphysicians of pursuing little more than the philosophy of A-level chemistry and have suggested that analytic metaphysics should simply be discontinued. In contrast, we shall argue, first of all, that even metaphysics that is disengaged from modern science may offer a set of resources that can be appropriated by philosophers of physics in order to (...)
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  15.  5
    Mamta Swaroop, Sagar C. Galwankar, Stanislaw P. A. Stawicki, Jayaraj M. Balakrishnan, Tamara Worlton, Ravi S. Tripathi, David P. Bahner, Sanjeev Bhoi, Colin Kaide & Thomas J. Papadimos (2014). The 9th Annual INDUS-EM 2013 Emergency Medicine Summit, “Principles, Practices, and Patients,” a Level One International Meeting, Kerala University of Health Sciences and Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur, Kerala, India, October 23–27, 2013. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):8.
    INDUS-EM is India’s only level one conference imparting and exchanging quality knowledge in acute care. Specifically, in general and specialized emergency care and training in trauma, burns, cardiac, stroke, environmental and disaster medicine. It provides a series of exchanges regarding academic development and implementation of training tools related to developing future academic faculty and residents in Emergency Medicine in India. The INDUS-EM leadership and board of directors invited scholars from multiple institutions to participate in this advanced educational symposium that (...)
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  16.  21
    Anita Konzelmann-Ziv (2008). Naturalized Rationality. A Glance At Bolzano's Philosophy Of Mind. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1):1-21.
    Bernard Bolzano's philosophy of mind is closely related to his metaphysical conceptions of substance, adherence and force. Questions as to how the mind is working are treated in terms of efficient faculties producing simple and complex representations, conclusive and non-conclusive judgments, and meta-representational attitudes such as believing and knowing. My paper outlines the proximity of Bolzano's account of "mental forces" to contemporary accounts of faculty psychology such as Modularity Theory and Simple Heuristics. While the modularist notions of domain specificity (...)
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  17.  9
    Ana Bazac (2011). Philosophy and Reform: A Word About Current Philosophy – Religion Dialogue Within the Romanian Educational System. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (28):108-128.
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} The analysis aims at showing that the position of philosophy in society depends upon two factors: the real spirit of reform born from philosophy and the appetence of society for reform. The first part of the present study provides a short historical illustration of the genuine character of (...)
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  18.  8
    K. Brad Wray (2013). Specialization in Philosophy: A Preliminary Study. Scientometrics.
    I examine the degree of specialization in various sub-fields of philosophy, drawing on data from the PhilPapers Survey. The following three sub-fields are highly specialized: Ancient philosophy, seventeenth/eighteenth century philosophy, and philosophy of physics. The following sub-fields have a low level of specialization: metaphilosophy, philosophy of religion, philosophy of probability, philosophy of the social sciences, decision theory, and philosophy of race and gender. Highly specialized sub-fields tend to require extensive knowledge in (...)
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  19. Michael W. Austin (ed.) (2007). Running & Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell Pub..
    A unique anthology of essays exploring the philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run. It features writings from some of America’s leading philosophers, including Martha Nussbaum, Charles Taliaferro, and J.P. Moreland. A first-of-its-kind collection of essays exploring those gems of philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run Topics considered include running and the philosophy of friendship; the freedom of the long distance runner; running as aesthetic experience, and “Could a Zombie Run a Marathon?” Contributing essayists (...)
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  20. Edward Stanley Bennett (1931). A Philosophy in Outline. London, K. Paul, Trench, Trubner & Co., Ltd..
    First published in 1931, this book provides a brief overview of the essentials of philosophy. It aims to combat the notion of the inaccessibility of philosophy by providing an introduction to its history and what the author believes to a ‘minimum dose…of incontrovertible philosophical truth’. The book merely assumes an ordinary level of adult education and offers an outline of the key areas of philosophy — consciousness, reality, experience, Life, God, love, aesthetics, conduct, logic — and (...)
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  21. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (eds.) (2002). A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides. Oxford University Press.
    Featuring a unique pedagogical apparatus, A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides provides selections from the most influential primary works in philosophy from the Presocratics through the twentieth century, integrating them with substantial commentary and study questions. It offers extensive treatment of the Hellenistic and Renaissance periods--which are typically given only minimal coverage in other anthologies--and devotes substantial chapters to nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy. The selections are organized historically and are presented in short and manageable (...)
     
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  22. Willem A. deVries & Timm Triplett (2000). Knowledge, Mind, and the Given: A Reading of Sellars’ “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind”. Hackett.
    This is a careful explication of and commentary on Wilfrid Sellars's classic essay "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind" [EPM]. It is appropriate for upper-level undergraduates and beyond. The full text of EPM is included in the volume.
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  23. William J. Rapaport (1986). Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence: A Course Outline. Teaching Philosophy 9 (2):103-120.
    In the Fall of 1983, I offered a junior/senior-level course in Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence, in the Department of Philosophy at SUNY Fredonia, after returning there from a year’s leave to study and do research in computer science and artificial intelligence (AI) at SUNY Buffalo. Of the 30 students enrolled, most were computerscience majors, about a third had no computer background, and only a handful had studied any philosophy. (I might note that enrollments have subsequently increased (...)
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  24.  36
    Morgan Thompson, Toni Adleberg, Sam Sims & Eddy Nahmias (2016). Why Do Women Leave Philosophy? Surveying Students at the Introductory Level. Philosophers' Imprint 16 (6).
    Although recent research suggests that women are underrepresented in philosophy after initial philosophy courses, there have been relatively few empirical investigations into the factors that lead to this early drop-off in women’s representation. In this paper, we present the results of empirical investigations at a large American public university that explore various factors contributing to women’s underrepresentation in philosophy at the undergraduate level. We administered climate surveys to hundreds of students completing their Introduction to Philosophy (...)
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  25.  58
    Enrique Dussel (2009). A New Age in the History of Philosophy: The World Dialogue Between Philosophical Traditions. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):499-516.
    This article argues the following points. (1) It is necessary to affirm that all of humanity has always sought to address certain `core universal problems' that are present in all cultures. (2) The rational responses to these `core problems' first acquire the shape of mythical narratives. (3) The formulation of categorical philosophical discourses is a subsequent development in human rationality, which does not, however, negate all mythical narratives. These discourses arose in all the great urban neolithic cultures (even if only (...)
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  26.  60
    V. V. Sokolov (1997). Philosophy in a Historical Perspective. Russian Studies in Philosophy 36 (2):54-73.
    The breadth and ambiguity of philosophical concepts opens the door to the most diverse interpretations of these concepts and their manifold relations. Often the ideological use of philosophical concepts and ideas descends to the level of everyday meanings in which vagueness and even primitivism become a regular phenomenon of spiritual everyday life. The basic task of professional philosophers is to define clearly the subject of their science. This task is, of course, very difficult, as is evident from the multitude (...)
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  27.  45
    Alex Voorhoeve (2001). Review of Alex Rosenberg's Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge, London, 2000. Pp. 191. For Philosophy Today, 2001. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today 14:8-9.
    Philosophy of Science is a mid-level text for students with some grounding in philosophy. It introduces the questions that drive enquiry in the philosophy of science, and aims to educate readers in the main positions, problems and arguments in the field today. Alex Rosenberg is certainly well qualified to write such an introduction. His works cover a large area of the philosophy of natural and social sciences. In addition, the author of the argument that the (...)
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  28.  15
    Charles E. Zimmerman Jr (2007). There's a Deaf Student in Your Philosophy Class—Now What? Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):421-442.
    Having a deaf student in class can pose a tremendous challenge for both the professor and the student, but it can also be an incredibly rewarding experience. To help make it so, this article briefly covers the differences between American Sign Language and English and then identifies aspects of linguistic skills where the deaf student may encounter difficulty in dealing with Philosophy. Those discussed are inadequate vocabulary, problems in reading and writing, insufficient background or “life” information, and difficulty in (...)
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  29.  20
    Christian Lotz (2009). Representation or Sensation? A Critique of Deleuze’s Philosophy of Painting. Sympsium. Canadian Journal for Continental Philosophy 13 (1):59-73.
    In this paper I shall present an argument against Deleuze’s philosophy of painting. Deleuze’s main thesis in Logic of Sensation is twofold: [1] he claims that painting is based on a non-representational level; and [2] he claims that this level comes out of the materiality of painting. I shall claim that Deleuze’s theses should be rejected for the following reasons: first, the difference between non-intentional life and the representational world is too strict. I submit that the non-intentional (...)
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  30.  20
    Christian Lotz (2009). Representation or Sensation? A Critique of Deleuze’s Philosophy of Painting. Symposium: The Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy 13 (1):59-72.
    In this paper, I shall present an argument against Deleuze’s philosophy of painting. Deleuze’s main thesis in Logic of Sensation is twofold: [1] he claims that painting is based on a non-representational level; and [2] he claims that this level comes out of the materiality of painting. I shall claim that Deleuze’s theses should be rejected for the following reasons: first, the difference between non-intentional life and the representational world is too strict. I submit that the nonintentional (...)
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  31.  17
    Barbara Grant (2002). “I Thought Philosophy Was a Girl Thing”. Teaching Philosophy 25 (3):213-226.
    This paper investigates why women in their first year enter philosophy at a representative level but their participation falls subsequently thereafter. Using data gathered from women students that are currently enrolled in a philosophy department at a university in Aotearoa New Zealand, the paper provides a set of recommendations for changing this pattern in women’s participation and how one particular department responded to these recommendations. In addition, the paper raises several reflective questions concerning the data gathered from (...)
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  32.  5
    Marina Santi (2015). Doing Philosophy in the Classroom as Community Activity: A Cultural-Historical Approach. Childhood and Philosophy 10 (20):283-304.
    One of the most traditional ways to teach philosophy in secondary school is a historical approach”, which takes a historicist view of philosophy and uses teaching practice based on teacher-centred lessons and textbook study by students. Only recently a debate on different approaches to teach philosophy is developing, considering the discipline as practical and dialogical activity to be fostered in the classroom. What could mean “doing philosophy” in the classroom from an instructional perspective? What are the (...)
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  33. Jerome Gellman (2011). I Called to God From a Narrow Place a Wide Future for Philosophy of Religion. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):43 - 66.
    I urge philosophers of religion to investigate far more vigorously than they have until now the acceptability of varied components of the world religions and their epistemological underpinnings. By evaluating "acceptability" I mean evaluation of truth, morality, spiritual efficacy and human flourishing, in fact, any value religious devotees might think significant to their religious lives. Secondly, I urge that philosophers of religion give more attention to what scholars have called the "esoteric" level of world religions, including components of strong (...)
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  34.  21
    Anthony F. Beavers & Derek Jones (2014). Philosophy in the Age of Information: A Symposium on Luciano Floridi's The Philosophy of Information. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 24 (1):1-3.
    This special issue of Minds and Machines contains a number of responses to Luciano Floridi’s groundbreaking Philosophy of Information (Oxford 2011). The essays contained here have been grouped by topic; essays 1–5 concern epistemological features of Floridi’s approach, and essays 6–8 address his metaphysics.In “On Floridi’s Method of Levels ofion”, Jan van Leeuwen addresses Floridi’s operational definition of a level of abstraction. Emphasizing the link between Floridi’s notion of abstraction and that used in computer science, van Leeuven notes (...)
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  35. Michael Lacewing (2006). Revise Philosophy for as Level. Routledge.
    _Revise Philosophy for AS Level_ is the definitive revision guide for students of the Advanced Subsidiary level syllabus. Following the AQA syllabus, it helps students revise using past exam questions, examiner's reports, and tips on revision for the examination. Also included are a helpful glossary and annotated further reading. It covers all three units of the AS Level syllabus: Unit 1: Theory of Knowledge Unit 2: Moral Philosophy and Philosophy of Religion Unit 3: Texts. The (...)
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  36. Diana Raffman (1986). Aesthetics Naturalized: Cognitivist Reflections on a Traditional Problem in the Philosophy of Art. Dissertation, Yale University
    The thesis develops a cognitivist account of the supposed ineffability of musical experience. It is contended that, when the ineffability is viewed as adhering to a certain kind of perceptual knowledge of a musical signal, its nature can be illuminated by the adoption of a recent cognitivist theory of perception in conjunction with a generative grammar for tonal music . On this two-headed view, music perception consists in a rule-governed process of computing a series of increasingly abstract mental representations of (...)
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  37. Joseph Shieber (2010). On the Nature of Thought Experiments and a Core Motivation of Experimental Philosophy. Philosophical Psychology 23 (4):547-564.
    In this paper I discuss some underlying motivations common to most strands of experimental philosophy, noting that most forms of experimental philosophy have a commitment to the claim that certain empirical evidence concerning the level of agreement on intuitive judgments across cultures, ethnic groups or socioeconomic strata impugns the role that intuitions play in traditional “armchair” philosophy. I then develop an argument to suggest that, even if one were to grant the truth of the data adduced (...)
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  38. Lars Svendsen (2008). A Philosophy of Fear. Reaktion Books.
    Surveillance cameras. Airport security lines. Barred store windows. We see manifestations of societal fears everyday, and daily news reports on the latest household danger or raised terror threat level continually stoke our sense of impending doom. In _A Philosophy of Fear_, Lars Svendsen now explores the underlying ideas and issues behind this powerful emotion, as he investigates how and why fear has insinuated itself into every aspect of modern life. Svendsen delves into science, politics, sociology, and literature to (...)
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  39.  5
    Dimitris Gakis (2016). Philosophy as Paradigms: An Account of a Contextual Metaphilosophical Perspective. Philosophical Papers 45 (1-2):209-239.
    The present paper aims at highlighting some of the main characteristics of a descriptive contextual approach to philosophy. Descriptive, in the sense that it centers not on the question of what philosophy should be, but on what philosophy is, has been, or may be. And contextual, in the sense that it treats philosophy as human praxis situated in and interacting with certain social and historical settings. In order to develop such an account, we engage closely with (...)
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  40.  16
    Katerina Ierodiakonou (2015). VI: Byzantine Philosophy. Section 3: A Sourcebook of Byzantine Philosophy. Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 56:23-27.
    : Byzantine philosophy is an unexplored field and one of the more neglected periods in the history of philosophy. Although Byzantine philosophers often have received credit for transmitting ancient philosophical texts, they have not been studied for their own philosophical merit. In order to make easier the study of Byzantine philosophy, to introduce it to a broader academic public and to promote teaching of the subject at the university level, I propose to edit a three-volume sourcebook (...)
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  41.  23
    Luciano Floridi (2010). The Philosophy of Information as a Conceptual Framework. Knowledge, Technology & Policy 23 (1):1-31.
    The article contains the replies to the collection of contributions discussing my research on the philosophy of information.
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  42.  85
    Stuart R. Hameroff (1998). "Funda-Mentality": Is the Conscious Mind Subtly Linked to a Basic Level of the Universe? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):119-124.
    Age-old battle lines over the puzzling nature of mental experience are shaping a modern resurgence in the study of consciousness. On one side are the long-dominant "physicalists" who view consciousness as an emergent property of the brain's neural networks. On the alternative, rebellious side are those who see a necessary added ingredient: proto-conscious experience intrinsic to reality, perhaps understandable through modern physics (panpsychists, pan-experientialists, "funda-mentalists"). It is argued here that the physicalist premise alone is unable to solve completely the difficult (...)
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  43.  7
    John Deely (2011). Postmodernity as the Unmasking of Objectivity: Identifying the Positive Essence of Postmodernity as a Distinct New Era in the History of Philosophy. Semiotica 2011 (183):31-57.
    The aim of this article is to show clearly what the terms “object” and “objectivity” as used over the centuries of modern philosophy — from the time of Descartes down to the time of Wittgenstein and Husserl, i.e., from early modern Rationalism and Empiricism to late modern Phenomenology and Analytic philosophy — have obscured. Objectivity, far from being “the ability to consider or represent facts, information, etc., without being influenced by personal feelings or opinions; impartiality; detachment,” as the (...)
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  44.  48
    Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible (...) for explanations of memory, consciousness and attention. Bickle presents a fascinating set of experimental cases of such molecule-to-mind explanations. This book qualifies as a showcase of naturalism in the philosophy of mind. Naturally, many of the traditional conceptual approaches in the philosophy of mind are given short shrift, but - in Bickle's metascientific scheme - the role of philosophy of science also seems reduced to explicating laboratory findings. The present reviewers think that this reductionism suffers from overstretching; in particular, the idea of 'explanation in a single bound' from molecule to mind is a bit too ruthless. Still, Bickle's arguments are worth serious attention. (shrink)
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  45.  54
    René Jagnow (2007). Lisa A. Shabel. Mathematics in Kant's Critical Philosophy: Reflections on Mathematical Practice. Studies in Philosophy Outstanding Dissertations, Robert Nozick, Ed. New York & London: Routledge, 2003. ISBN 0-415-93955-0. Pp. 178 (Cloth). [REVIEW] Philosophia Mathematica 15 (3):366-386.
    In this interesting and engaging book, Shabel offers an interpretation of Kant's philosophy of mathematics as expressed in his critical writings. Shabel's analysis is based on the insight that Kant's philosophical standpoint on mathematics cannot be understood without an investigation into his perception of mathematical practice in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. She aims to illuminate Kant's theory of the construction of concepts in pure intuition—the basis for his conclusion that mathematical knowledge is synthetic a priori. She does this (...)
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  46.  9
    Jarosław Sak (2008). Is a Disease Cognizable? Considerations on Philosophy of Medicine in Reference to the New Epistemology of Jan Srzednicki. Dialogue and Universalism 18 (1/3):157-163.
    The fundamental problem of Jan Srzednicki’s new epistemology is the question: how thoughts surpass the resistance of that what is ontologically present, how this process is possible? In Srzednicki’s opinion, thinking is a process of distancing from the pressure of ontological presence. His ideas offer a splendid inspiration for philosophy of medicine which attempts to answer the question “whether (and how) a disease is cognizable?” This question refers directly to and is translated into the question of the capacity to (...)
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  47.  9
    Enrique Dussel (2012). A New Age in the History of Philosophy. Journal of Philosophical Research 37 (Supplement):151-166.
    This paper argues the following points: (1) It is necessary to affirm that humanity has always sought to address certain “core universal problems” that are present in all cultures. (2) The rational responses to these “core problems” first appear as mythical narratives. (3) The formulation of categorical philosophical discourses is a subsequent development in human rationality, which does not however negate all mythical narratives. (4) Modern European philosophy confused its economic, political, and cultural domination, and the resulting crises in (...)
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  48.  8
    Marcelo Dascal, Reframing the Historiography of Philosophy: A Dialectic Approach.
    Kant considered it a scandal that philosophy, unlike science, had been spending its time in fruitless debates, which hindered its progress. In this session, we question Kant’s assessment, and suggest an approach to the history of philosophy that considers controversy as essential in the evolution of philosophical ideas. In his recent work on the Enlightenment, Jonathan Israel has demonstrated the role of the intense debate around radically new philosophical ideas in creating the conceptual underpinnings of revolution and of (...)
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  49.  2
    Tomaž Grušovnik (2009). A Distant View. Globalization Inside Philosophy. Synthesis Philosophica 24 (1):117-130.
    When tackling with the issue of globalization in the context of philosophy, this article takes somewhat different route than expected: it doesn’t ponder upon the meaning and the consequences of the processes we call ‘global’, but instead tries to find out how philosophy, theoretical and literary production themselves have been affected by globalization. Instead of an attempt to immediately “think the globalization” it tries to show what “globalization has done to thinking”. In order to illustrate this point three (...)
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  50. Michael W. Austin (ed.) (2010). Running and Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Wiley-Blackwell.
    A unique anthology of essays exploring the philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run. It features writings from some of America’s leading philosophers, including Martha Nussbaum, Charles Taliaferro, and J.P. Moreland. A first-of-its-kind collection of essays exploring those gems of philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run Topics considered include running and the philosophy of friendship; the freedom of the long distance runner; running as aesthetic experience, and “Could a Zombie Run a Marathon?” Contributing essayists (...)
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