Search results for 'A level philosophy' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Greg Dewar (2009). AS and A Level Religious Studies: Philosophy & Ethics Through Diagrams: Oxford Revision Guides. OUP Oxford.score: 101.0
    This series builds on the fact that pictures are easier to memorize than words. Each topic is summarized on a single page using annotated diagrams and concise notes with a full index for easy reference. -/- Expert authors have taken the content of the AS and A Level specifications and presented them in a refreshingly clear and concise format.
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  2. Trevor Eaton (1987). Teaching Philosophy at A-Level. Cogito 1 (2):21-22.score: 87.0
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  3. R. Scott Kretchmar (1980). Social Philosophy of Athletics: A Pluralistic and Practice-Oriented Philosophical Analysis of Top Level Amateur Sport. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 7 (1):59-64.score: 84.0
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  4. Clinton J. Humbolt (1973). An Inquiry Into the Piagetian Tradition in America as a Basis for a Philosophy of Education at the Community College Level: A Quasi-Experimental Approach. [Washington,Educational Resources Information Center.score: 81.0
     
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  5. Gerard Radnitzky (1974). Towards a System Philosophy of Scientific Research. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 4 (3):369-398.score: 74.0
    Can research be studied in a way that is neither logical reconstruction nor empirical psychology or sociology of science? In contemporary philosophy of science this is usually denied—in spite of the recent 'paradigm shift' there. A system-philosophy approach in theory of research is outlined by means of some models : a research enterprise is viewed as a productive, innovative system, the research process as a transformation of complexes of knowledge-problems-instruments (software and hard ware). The direction this development takes (...)
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  6. Elizabeth Burns & Michael Lacewing (2004). Essay Writing and Exam Preparation. In Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.), Philosophy for as and A. Routledge.score: 72.0
  7. Matthew Lamb (2011). Philosophy as a Way of Life: Albert Camus and Pierre Hadot. Sophia 50 (4):561-576.score: 72.0
    This paper compares Pierre Hadot’s work on the history of philosophy as a way of life to the work of Albert Camus. I will argue that in the early work of Camus, up to and including the publication of The Myth of Sisyphus , there is evidence to support the notions that, firstly, Camus also identified these historical moments as obstacles to the practice of ascesis, and secondly, that he proceeded by orienting his own work toward overcoming these obstacles, (...)
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  8. María G. Navarro (2012). Review of 'New Waves in Philosophy of Action' Edited by Jesús H. Aguilar, Andrei A. Buckareff and Keith Frankish. [REVIEW] Metapsychology Online Reviews 16 (51).score: 72.0
    New Waves in Philosophy, a book collection that stands out for giving a snapshot of research in all areas of philosophy is a successful editorial project addressed by Vincent F. Hendricks and Duncan Pritchard. New Waves in Philosophy of Action is one of its last titles, edited by Jesús H. Aguilar, Andrei A. Buckareff and Keith Frankish. -/- The book is aimed at the researchers of all fields and readers in general interested in this sub-discipline of (...) very difficult to localize (is it part of a sub-discipline such as metaphysics or maybe part of the philosophy of mind?). What is and how can we know the nature of intentions and its role in action? (shrink)
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  9. Zhongjian Mou (2007). A Preliminary Discussion on Daoist Bionomy: On the Basis of Chen Yingning's Philosophy of Immortals. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (2):206-218.score: 72.0
    From the modern point of view, the Daoist regimen culture in China is actually a kind of oriental bionomy. Although it is less developed than the Western life sciences in terms of details and techniques, it has unique advantages in terms of its comprehensive grasp and dynamic observation of life, as well as its emphasis on the development of life potentiality and on the self adjustment and improvement of living bodies. Chen Yingning reestablished a Daoist bionomy through Xianxue 仙学 ( (...) of Immortals) which involves religious faith, philosophy and sciences, leaving us a valuable legacy. To establish a new bionomy system required by the modern society through learning from the Daoist bionomy, the academic circle has to seriously explore the four issues: (1) at the level of faith, to turn the Daoist faith in deities and gods into a pursuit of ideal personality; (2) with respect to the principles of regimen, to extend the dual cultivation into a kind of universal concept; (3) as with the way of regimen, to learn from the regimen thought of Daoism and combine the inner cultivation with the outer one, and static exercise with dynamic exercise; and (4) with regard to the ways of treatment of diseases, to combine the Daoist medicine with the Western medicine. (shrink)
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  10. William Bechtel (2009). Constructing a Philosophy of Science of Cognitive Science. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 1 (3):548-569.score: 71.0
    Philosophy of science is positioned to make distinctive contributions to cognitive science by providing perspective on its conceptual foundations and by advancing normative recommendations. The philosophy of science I embrace is naturalistic in that it is grounded in the study of actual science. Focusing on explanation, I describe the recent development of a mechanistic philosophy of science from which I draw three normative consequences for cognitive science. First, insofar as cognitive mechanisms are information-processing mechanisms, cognitive science needs (...)
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  11. Matthew Taylor (2007). Philosophy of Religion for as and A. Routledge.score: 71.0
    Endorsed by OCR for use with the OCR AS and A2 Religious Studies specifications. This tailor-made, up-to-date guide sets a new standard within the field. Written by an experienced teacher and edited by an experienced A-level examiner, this lively and student-friendly textbook strictly follows the OCR syllabus, covering all the areas integral to the course. Each chapter includes features such as explanations of key terminology, example examination questions, suggestions for activities and discussion, and recommended further reading. Philosophy of (...)
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  12. Klaus M. Meyer-Abich (1979). Toward a Practical Philosophy of Nature. Environmental Ethics 1 (4):293-308.score: 71.0
    The application of the polluter-pays principle in environmental policy depends on answers to the philosophical questions about what is good or detrimental with respect to nature. Science and the economy constitute a functional circle of “observing” nature’s unity as well as its utility. Based on a concept of nature as a system of causally related objects or - complementary to this - as a bunch of “resources,” however, the human interest and responsibility in nature do not seem to be properly (...)
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  13. H. Rosa (2004). Four Levels of Self-Interpretation: A Paradigm for Interpretive Social Philosophy and Political Criticism. Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (5-6):691-720.score: 71.0
    If we are to find the criteria for critical analyses of social arrangements and processes not in some abstract, universalist framework, but from the guiding ‘self-interpretations’ of the societies in question, as contemporary contextualist and ‘communitarian’ approaches to social philosophy suggest, the vexing question arises as to where these self-interpretations can be found and how they are identified. The paper presents a model according to which there are four interdependent as well as partially autonomous spheres or ‘levels’ of socially (...)
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  14. Elizabeth Burns & Stephen Law (eds.) (2004). Philosophy for as and A. Routledge.score: 69.0
    Philosophy for AS and A2 is the definitive textbook for students of Advanced Subsidiary or Advanced Level courses, structured directly around the specification of the AQA - the only exam board to offer these courses. Following a lively foreword by Nigel Warburton, author of Philosophy: The Basics , a team of experienced teachers devote a chapter each to the six themes covered by the syllabus: AS * Theory of Knowledge * Moral Philosophy * Philosophy of (...)
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  15. Anita Konzelmann Ziv (2008). Naturalized Rationality – A Glance at Bolzano's Philosophy of Mind. The Baltic International Yearbook of Cognition, Logic and Communication 4 (1):1-21.score: 69.0
    Bernard Bolzano's philosophy of mind is closely related to his metaphysical conceptions of substance, adherence and force. Questions as to how the mind is working are treated in terms of efficient (causal) faculties producing simple and complex representations, conclusive and non-conclusive judgments, and meta-representational attitudes such as believing and knowing. My paper outlines the proximity of Bolzano's account of "mental forces" to contemporary accounts of faculty psychology such as Modularity Theory and Simple Heuristics. While the modularist notions of domain (...)
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  16. K. Brad Wray (2013). Specialization in Philosophy: A Preliminary Study. Scientometrics.score: 69.0
    I examine the degree of specialization in various sub-fields of philosophy, drawing on data from the PhilPapers Survey. The following three sub-fields are highly specialized: Ancient philosophy, seventeenth/eighteenth century philosophy, and philosophy of physics. The following sub-fields have a low level of specialization: metaphilosophy, philosophy of religion, philosophy of probability, philosophy of the social sciences, decision theory, and philosophy of race and gender. Highly specialized sub-fields tend to require extensive knowledge in (...)
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  17. Ana Bazac (2011). Philosophy and Reform: A Word About Current Philosophy – Religion Dialogue Within the Romanian Educational System. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 10 (28):108-128.score: 69.0
    Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-ansi-language:#0400; mso-fareast-language:#0400; mso-bidi-language:#0400;} The analysis aims at showing that the position of philosophy in society depends upon two factors: the real spirit of reform born from philosophy and the appetence of society for reform. The first part of the present study provides a short historical illustration of the genuine character of (...)
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  18. Michael W. Austin (ed.) (2007). Running & Philosophy: A Marathon for the Mind. Blackwell Pub..score: 69.0
    A unique anthology of essays exploring the philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run. It features writings from some of America’s leading philosophers, including Martha Nussbaum, Charles Taliaferro, and J.P. Moreland. A first-of-its-kind collection of essays exploring those gems of philosophical wisdom runners contemplate when out for a run Topics considered include running and the philosophy of friendship; the freedom of the long distance runner; running as aesthetic experience, and “Could a Zombie Run a Marathon?” Contributing essayists (...)
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  19. James Fieser & Norman Lillegard (eds.) (2002). A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides. Oxford University Press.score: 69.0
    Featuring a unique pedagogical apparatus, A Historical Introduction to Philosophy: Texts and Interactive Guides provides selections from the most influential primary works in philosophy from the Presocratics through the twentieth century, integrating them with substantial commentary and study questions. It offers extensive treatment of the Hellenistic and Renaissance periods--which are typically given only minimal coverage in other anthologies--and devotes substantial chapters to nineteenth- and twentieth-century philosophy. The selections are organized historically and are presented in short and manageable (...)
     
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  20. Zuzana Parusnikova (1992). Is a Postmodern Philosophy of Science Possible? Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 23 (1):21-37.score: 68.0
    Two main tendencies in postmodernism can be identified, neither providing much scope for developing a postmodern philosophy of science. According to the first, the world is fragmented into a plurality of autonomous local discourses, implying that any advice to scientists can be given only from within science and not from philosophers who stand outside ( above') science. According to the second, the meaning of signs is fundamentally elusive (poststructuralism and deconstruction). A deconstructive philosophy of science might be conceived (...)
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  21. William J. Rapaport (1986). Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence: A Course Outline. Teaching Philosophy 9 (2):103-120.score: 66.0
    In the Fall of 1983, I offered a junior/senior-level course in Philosophy of Artificial Intelligence, in the Department of Philosophy at SUNY Fredonia, after returning there from a year’s leave to study and do research in computer science and artificial intelligence (AI) at SUNY Buffalo. Of the 30 students enrolled, most were computerscience majors, about a third had no computer background, and only a handful had studied any philosophy. (I might note that enrollments have subsequently increased (...)
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  22. Kwasi Wiredu, W. E. Abraham, Abiola Irele & Ifeanyi Menkiti (eds.) (2004/2006). A Companion to African Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    This volume of newly commissioned essays provides comprehensive coverage of African philosophy, ranging across disciplines and throughout the ages. Offers a distinctive historical treatment of African philosophy. Covers all the main branches of philosophy as addressed in the African tradition. Includes accounts of pre-colonial African philosophy and contemporary political thought.
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  23. Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (eds.) (1997). A Companion to the Philosophy of Language. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    Written by an international assembly of leading philosophers, this volume provides a survey of contemporary philosophy of language.
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  24. Enrique Dussel (2009). A New Age in the History of Philosophy: The World Dialogue Between Philosophical Traditions. Philosophy and Social Criticism 35 (5):499-516.score: 66.0
    This article argues the following points. (1) It is necessary to affirm that all of humanity has always sought to address certain `core universal problems' that are present in all cultures. (2) The rational responses to these `core problems' first acquire the shape of mythical narratives. (3) The formulation of categorical philosophical discourses is a subsequent development in human rationality, which does not, however, negate all mythical narratives. These discourses arose in all the great urban neolithic cultures (even if only (...)
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  25. Roberta L. Millstein (2006). Natural Selection as a Population-Level Causal Process. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 57 (4):627-653.score: 66.0
    Recent discussions in the philosophy of biology have brought into question some fundamental assumptions regarding evolutionary processes, natural selection in particular. Some authors argue that natural selection is nothing but a population-level, statistical consequence of lower-level events (Matthen and Ariew [2002]; Walsh et al. [2002]). On this view, natural selection itself does not involve forces. Other authors reject this purely statistical, population-level account for an individual-level, causal account of natural selection (Bouchard and Rosenberg [2004]). I (...)
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  26. Garry Hagberg & Walter Jost (eds.) (2010). A Companion to the Philosophy of Literature. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 66.0
    This monumental collection of new and recent essays from an international team of eminent scholars represents the best contemporary critical thinking relating to both literary and philosophical studies of literature. Helpfully groups essays into the field's main sub-categories, among them ‘Relations Between Philosophy and Literature’, ‘Emotional Engagement and the Experience of Reading’, ‘Literature and the Moral Life’, and ‘Literary Language’ Offers a combination of analytical precision and literary richness Represents an unparalleled work of reference for students and specialists alike, (...)
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  27. Tommy Lee Lott & John P. Pittman (eds.) (2003/2006). A Companion to African-American Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    This wide-ranging, multidisciplinary collection of newly commissioned articles brings together distinguished voices in the field of Africana philosophy and African-American social and political thought. Provides a comprehensive critical survey of African-American philosophical thought. Collects wide-ranging, multidisciplinary, newly commissioned articles in one authoritative volume. Serves as a benchmark work of reference for courses in philosophy, social and political thought, cultural studies, and African-American studies.
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  28. Mary Louise Gill & Pierre Pellegrin (eds.) (2006). A Companion to Ancient Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    A Companion to Ancient Philosophy provides a comprehensive and current overview of the history of ancient Greek and Roman philosophy from its origins until late antiquity. Comprises an extensive collection of original essays, featuring contributions from both rising stars and senior scholars of ancient philosophy Integrates analytic and continental traditions Explores the development of various disciplines, such as mathematics, logic, grammar, physics, and medicine, in relation to ancient philosophy Includes an illuminating introduction, bibliography, chronology, maps and (...)
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  29. W. Newton-Smith (ed.) (2000). A Companion to the Philosophy of Science. Blackwell Publishers.score: 66.0
    Taken as a whole, the volume provides an unparalleled survey of all the topical areas, major methods, and stances in the philosophy of science.
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  30. Sahotra Sarkar & Anya Plutynski (eds.) (2008). A Companion to the Philosophy of Biology. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    Comprised of essays by top scholars in the field, this volume offers concise overviews of philosophical issues raised by biology. Brings together a team of eminent scholars to explore the philosophical issues raised by biology Addresses traditional and emerging topics, spanning molecular biology and genetics, evolution, developmental biology, immunology, ecology, mind and behaviour, neuroscience, and experimentation Begins with a thorough introduction to the field Goes beyond previous treatments that focused only on evolution to give equal attention to other areas, such (...)
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  31. Alex Voorhoeve (2001). Review of Alex Rosenberg's Philosophy of Science: A Contemporary Introduction. Routledge, London, 2000. Pp. 191. For Philosophy Today, 2001. [REVIEW] Philosophy Today 14:8-9.score: 66.0
    Philosophy of Science is a mid-level text for students with some grounding in philosophy. It introduces the questions that drive enquiry in the philosophy of science, and aims to educate readers in the main positions, problems and arguments in the field today. Alex Rosenberg is certainly well qualified to write such an introduction. His works cover a large area of the philosophy of natural and social sciences. In addition, the author of the argument that the (...)
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  32. Aloysius Martinich & David Sosa (eds.) (2001). A Companion to Analytic Philosophy. Blackwell.score: 66.0
    This volume is a vital resource for anyone interested in analytic philosophy.
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  33. Nikolay Milkov (2013). Kant’s Transcendental Turn as a Second Phase in the Logicization of Philosophy. In Stefano Bacin (ed.), Kant and Philosophy in a Cosmopolitan Sense, vol. 1. de Gruyter. 653-666.score: 66.0
    This paper advances an assessment of Kant’s Critique of Pure Reason made from a bird’s eye view. Seen from this perspective, the task of Kant’s work was to ground the spontaneity of human reason, preserving at the same time the strict methods of science and mathematics. Kant accomplished this objective by reviving an old philosophical discipline: the peirastic dialectic of Plato and Aristotle. What is more, he managed to combine it with logic. From this blend, Kant’s transcendental idealism appeared as (...)
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  34. Steven M. Nadler (ed.) (2002). A Companion to Early Modern Philosophy. Blackwell Pub..score: 66.0
    These newly commissioned essays span a wide range of philosophical areas and problems, including metaphysics, epistemology, philosophy of science, ethics, ...
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  35. Christian Lotz (2009). Representation or Sensation? A Critique of Deleuze’s Philosophy of Painting. Sympsium. Canadian Journal for Continental Philosophy 13 (1):59-73.score: 66.0
    In this paper I shall present an argument against Deleuze’s philosophy of painting. Deleuze’s main thesis in Logic of Sensation is twofold: [1] he claims that painting is based on a non-representational level; and [2] he claims that this level comes out of the materiality of painting. I shall claim that Deleuze’s theses should be rejected for the following reasons: first, the difference between non-intentional life and the representational world is too strict. I submit that the non-intentional (...)
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  36. Mamta Swaroop, Sagar C. Galwankar, Stanislaw P. A. Stawicki, Jayaraj M. Balakrishnan, Tamara Worlton, Ravi S. Tripathi, David P. Bahner, Sanjeev Bhoi, Colin Kaide & Thomas J. Papadimos (2014). The 9th Annual INDUS-EM 2013 Emergency Medicine Summit, “Principles, Practices, and Patients,” a Level One International Meeting, Kerala University of Health Sciences and Jubilee Mission Medical College and Research Institute, Thrissur, Kerala, India, October 23–27, 2013. [REVIEW] Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 9 (1):8.score: 66.0
    INDUS-EM is India’s only level one conference imparting and exchanging quality knowledge in acute care. Specifically, in general and specialized emergency care and training in trauma, burns, cardiac, stroke, environmental and disaster medicine. It provides a series of exchanges regarding academic development and implementation of training tools related to developing future academic faculty and residents in Emergency Medicine in India. The INDUS-EM leadership and board of directors invited scholars from multiple institutions to participate in this advanced educational symposium that (...)
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  37. Charles E. Zimmerman Jr (2007). There's a Deaf Student in Your Philosophy Class—Now What? Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):421-442.score: 66.0
    Having a deaf student in class can pose a tremendous challenge for both the professor and the student, but it can also be an incredibly rewarding experience. To help make it so, this article briefly covers the differences between American Sign Language and English and then identifies aspects of linguistic skills where the deaf student may encounter difficulty in dealing with Philosophy. Those discussed are inadequate vocabulary, problems in reading and writing, insufficient background or “life” information, and difficulty in (...)
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  38. Willem A. deVries & Timm Triplett (2000). Knowledge, Mind, and the Given: A Reading of Sellars’ “Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind”. Hackett.score: 66.0
    This is a careful explication of and commentary on Wilfrid Sellars's classic essay "Empiricism and the Philosophy of Mind" [EPM]. It is appropriate for upper-level undergraduates and beyond. The full text of EPM is included in the volume.
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  39. Jerome Gellman (2011). I Called to God From a Narrow Place a Wide Future for Philosophy of Religion. European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 3 (1):43 - 66.score: 66.0
    I urge philosophers of religion to investigate far more vigorously than they have until now the acceptability of varied components of the world religions and their epistemological underpinnings. By evaluating "acceptability" I mean evaluation of truth, morality, spiritual efficacy and human flourishing, in fact, any value religious devotees might think significant to their religious lives. Secondly, I urge that philosophers of religion give more attention to what scholars have called the "esoteric" level of world religions, including components of strong (...)
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  40. Massimo Pigliucci (2008). A Transcendental Philosophy of Science. Philosophy Now 66:48.score: 65.0
    Can there be a transcendental philosophy of science? What would it be good for?
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  41. Drucilla K. Barker & Edith Kuiper (eds.) (2003). Toward a Feminist Philosophy of Economics. Routledge.score: 65.0
    Feminist economists have demonstrated that interrogating hierarchies based on gender, ethnicity, class and nation results in an economics that is biased and more faithful to empirical evidence than are mainstream accounts. This rigorous and comprehensive book examines many of the central philosophical questions and themes in feminist economics including: · History of economics · Feminist science studies · Identity and agency · Caring labor · Postcolonialism and postmodernism With contributions from such leading figures as Nancy Folbre, Julie Nelson and Sandra (...)
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  42. Anthony F. Beavers & Derek Jones (2014). Philosophy in the Age of Information: A Symposium on Luciano Floridi's The Philosophy of Information. [REVIEW] Minds and Machines 24 (1):1-3.score: 65.0
    This special issue of Minds and Machines contains a number of responses to Luciano Floridi’s groundbreaking Philosophy of Information (Oxford 2011). The essays contained here have been grouped by topic; essays 1–5 concern epistemological features of Floridi’s approach, and essays 6–8 address his metaphysics.In “On Floridi’s Method of Levels ofion”, Jan van Leeuwen addresses Floridi’s operational definition of a level of abstraction. Emphasizing the link between Floridi’s notion of abstraction and that used in computer science, van Leeuven notes (...)
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  43. Matthew C. Halteman (2002). Toward a Continental Philosophy of Religion: Derrida, Responsibility, and Non-Dogmatic Faith. In Philip Goodchild (ed.), Rethinking Philosophy of Religion: Approaches from Continental Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 63.0
    From its inception in Kant's efforts to articulate a "religion within the limits of reason alone," the Continental tradition has maintained a strict division of labor between theological and philosophical reflection on religion. In what follows, I examine this continental legacy in the context of Jacques Derrida's recent work on the concept of responsibility. First I discuss three guiding themes (the limits of speculative analysis, the idea of nondogmatic religion, and the importance of the other) that characterize the continental tradition's (...)
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  44. Joseph Shieber (2010). On the Nature of Thought Experiments and a Core Motivation of Experimental Philosophy. Philosophical Psychology 23 (4):547-564.score: 63.0
    In this paper I discuss some underlying motivations common to most strands of experimental philosophy, noting that most forms of experimental philosophy have a commitment to the claim that certain empirical evidence concerning the level of agreement on intuitive judgments across cultures, ethnic groups or socioeconomic strata impugns the role that intuitions play in traditional “armchair” philosophy. I then develop an argument to suggest that, even if one were to grant the truth of the data adduced (...)
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  45. Stuart R. Hameroff (1998). "Funda-Mentality": Is the Conscious Mind Subtly Linked to a Basic Level of the Universe? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 2 (4):119-124.score: 63.0
    Age-old battle lines over the puzzling nature of mental experience are shaping a modern resurgence in the study of consciousness. On one side are the long-dominant "physicalists" who view consciousness as an emergent property of the brain's neural networks. On the alternative, rebellious side are those who see a necessary added ingredient: proto-conscious experience intrinsic to reality, perhaps understandable through modern physics (panpsychists, pan-experientialists, "funda-mentalists"). It is argued here that the physicalist premise alone is unable to solve completely the difficult (...)
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  46. Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.score: 63.0
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible (...) for explanations of memory, consciousness and attention. Bickle presents a fascinating set of experimental cases of such molecule-to-mind explanations. This book qualifies as a showcase of naturalism in the philosophy of mind. Naturally, many of the traditional conceptual approaches in the philosophy of mind are given short shrift, but - in Bickle's metascientific scheme - the role of philosophy of science also seems reduced to explicating laboratory findings. The present reviewers think that this reductionism suffers from overstretching; in particular, the idea of 'explanation in a single bound' from molecule to mind is a bit too ruthless. Still, Bickle's arguments are worth serious attention. (shrink)
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  47. Tudor Baetu (forthcoming). Defining Species: A Multi-Level Approach. Acta Biotheoretica.score: 63.0
    Abstract Different concepts define species at the pattern-level grouping of organisms into discrete clusters, the level of the processes operating within and between populations leading to the formation and maintenance of these clusters, or the level of the inner-organismic genetic and molecular mechanisms that contribute to species cohesion or promote speciation. I argue that, unlike single-level approaches, a multi-level framework takes into account the complex sequences of cause-effect reinforcements leading to the formation and maintenance of (...)
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  48. Arnon Keren (2011). Disagreement, Democracy, and the Goals of Science: Is a Normative Philosophy of Science Possible, If Ethical Inquiry Is Not? Philosophy 86 (04):525-544.score: 63.0
    W.V.Quine and Philip Kitcher have both developed naturalistic approaches to the philosophy of science which are partially based on a skeptical view about the possibility of rational inquiry into certain questions of value. Nonetheless, both Quine and Kitcher do not wish to give up on the normative dimension of the philosophy of science. I argue that Kitcher's recent argument against the specification of the goal of science in terms of truth raises a problem for Quine's account of the (...)
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  49. A. Chalmers (2002). Experiment Versus Mechanical Philosophy in the Work of Robert Boyle: A Reply to Anstey and Pyle. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 33 (1):187-193.score: 63.0
    We can distinguish 'mechanical' in the strict sense of the mechanical philosophers from 'mechanical' in the common sense. My claim is that Boyle's experimental science owed nothing to, and offered no support for, the mechanical philosophy in the strict sense. The attempts by my critics to undermine my case involve their interpreting 'mechanical' in something like the common sense. I certainly accept that Boyle's experimental science was productively informed by mechanical analogies, where 'mechanical' is interpreted in a common sense. (...)
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  50. Kurtis G. Hagen, Confucian Constructivism: A Reconstruction and Application of the Philosophy of Xunzi.score: 63.0
    In Part 1, I offer a "constructivist" interpretation of Xunzi's philosophy. On the constructivist view, there is no privileged description of the world. Concepts, categories, and norms as social constructs help us effectively manage our way through the world, rather than reveal or express univocal knowledge of it. In the opening chapter, I argue that dao should be understood as open ended and that Xunzi's worldview allows for a plurality of legitimate daos-at least at the theoretical level. Chapter (...)
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