Search results for 'A. C. S. McDermott' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. A. C. S. McDermott (1975). Towards a Pragmatics of Mantra Recitation. Journal of Indian Philosophy 3 (3-4):283-298.score: 2610.0
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  2. A. C. S. McDermott (1970). Empty Subject Terms in Late Buddhist Logic. Journal of Indian Philosophy 1 (1):22-29.score: 2010.0
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  3. Ryan McDermott (2012). John Henry Newman and the Oratory School Latin Plays. Newman Studies Journal 9 (2):6-12.score: 1200.0
    This essay describes Newman’s adaptations of plays by Plautus (c. 254–184 BC) and Terence (195/185–159 BC) for performance at the Birmingham Oratory School. Because Newman believed in the value of Latin plays for students, he expended a great deal of energy on their adaptation and production while carefully editing the plays to omit any questionable content.
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  4. Tom Burke (1994). Dewey's New Logic: A Reply to Russell. University of Chicago Press.score: 438.0
    John Dewey is celebrated for his work in the philosophy of education and acknowledged as a leading proponent of American pragmatism. His philosophy of logic, on the other hand, is largely unheard of. In Dewey's New Logic, Burke analyzes portions of the debate between Dewey and Bertrand Russell that followed the 1938 publication of Dewey's Logic: The Theory of Inquiry. Burke shows how Russell failed to understand Dewey, and how Dewey's philosophy of logic is centrally relevant to contemporary developments in (...)
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  5. Heikki A. Kovalainen (2010). New Morning: Emerson in the Twenty-First Century (Review). Transactions of the Charles S. Peirce Society 46 (4):650-655.score: 216.0
    This timely anthology contains five pieces of republished poetry (and one original poem) and eleven essays of varying length taking mostly contemporary stances on—and thus hoping to spur the on-going reception into the twenty-first century of—the work of Ralph Waldo Emerson. The assortment of the texts is heterogeneous, yet showing a slight philosophical emphasis: among the eleven essays, half a dozen are by authors trained in philosophy, a couple by literary scholars, and another couple by poets. The prose pieces are (...)
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  6. Michael Novak (1968). American Philosophy and the Future. New York, Scribner.score: 198.0
    To be human is to humanize; a radically empirical aesthetic, by J. J. McDermott.--Dream and nightmare; the future as revolution, by R. C. Pollock.--William James and metaphysical risk, by P. M. Van Buren.--Knowing as a passionate and personal quest; C. S. Peirce, by D. B. Burrell.--The fox alone is death; Whitehead and speculative philosophy, by A. J. Reck.--A man and a city; George Herbert Mead in Chicago, by R. M. Barry.--Royce; analyst of religion as community, by J. Collins.--Human experience (...)
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  7. Vincent G. Potter (ed.) (1988). Doctrine and Experience: Essays in American Philosophy. Fordham University Press.score: 192.0
    This collection of thirteen essays, when viewed together, offers a unique perspective on the history of American philosophy. It illuminates for the first time in book form, how thirteen major American philosophical thinkers viewed a problem of special interest in the American philosophical tradition: the relationship between experience and reflection. Written by well-known authorities on the figure about which he or she writes, the essays are arranged chronologically to highlight the changes and developments in thought from Puritanism to Pragmatism to (...)
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  8. Philip L. Quinn (2003). Honoring Jonathan Edwards. Journal of Religious Ethics 31 (2):299 - 321.score: 192.0
    In this response to the papers on Jonathan Edwards's ethical thought by Stephen A. Wilson, Gerald R. McDermott, William C. Spohn, and Roland A. Delattre, I comment on their efforts to show that ideas drawn from Edwards can be successfully appropriated for use in contemporary ethics. I conclude that the four authors build a strong cumulative case for the view that some elements of Edwards's thought can serve as resources for our ethical reflections. But I also argue for a (...)
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