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  1. A. Charles Catania (forthcoming). Autoclitic Processes and the Structure of Behavior. Behaviorism.
     
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  2. A. Charles Catania (forthcoming). The Concept of the Operant in the Analysis of Behavior. Behaviorism.
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  3. A. Charles Catania (forthcoming). The Myth of Self-Reinforcement. Behaviorism.
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  4. A. Charles Catania (2009). Cognitive Science at Fifty. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (2):141-141.
    Fifty years or so after the cognitive revolution, some cognitive accounts seem to be converging on treatments of how we come to know about ourselves and others that have much in common with behavior analytic accounts. Among the factors that keep the accounts separate is that behavioral accounts take a much broader view of what counts as behavior.
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  5. A. Charles Catania (2009). Language Evolution: Two Tracks Are Not Enough. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 32 (5):451-452.
    This commentary argues that Evans & Levinson (E&L) should expand their two-track model to a three-track model in which biological and cultural evolution interact with the evolution of an individual's language repertories in ontogeny. It also comments on the relevance of the argument from the poverty of the stimulus and offers a caveat, based on analogous issues in biology, on the metaphor of language as a container, whether of meanings or of other content.
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  6. A. Charles Catania (2008). Brain and Behavior: Which Way Does the Shaping Go? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (5):516-517.
    Evolutionary contingencies select organisms based on what they can do; brains and other evolved structures serve their behavior. Arguments that brains drive language structure get the direction wrong; with functional issues unacknowledged, interactions between central structures and periphery are overlooked. Evidence supports a peripherally driven central organization. If language modules develop like other brain compartments, then environmental consistencies can engender both structural and functional language units (e.g., the different phonemic, semantic, and grammatical structures of different languages).
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  7. A. Charles Catania (2005). Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): Delay-of-Reinforcement Gradients and Other Behavioral Mechanisms. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):419-424.
    Sagvolden, Johansen, Aase, and Russell (Sagvolden et al.) examine attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) at levels of analysis ranging from neurotransmitters to behavior. At the behavioral level they attribute aspects of ADHD to anomalies of delay-of-reinforcement gradients. With a normal gradient, responses followed after a long delay by a reinforcer may share in the effects of that reinforcer; with a diminished or steepened gradient they may fail to do so. Steepened gradients differentially select rapidly emitted responses (hyperactivity), and they limit the effectiveness (...)
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  8. A. Charles Catania (2005). Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD): One Process or Many? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (3):446-450.
    Some commentaries suggest that the attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) theory of this condition does not explain enough. Because the theory includes parameters of the delay gradient that vary across individuals and developmental modulation of behavioral outcomes by different environments, it accommodates a wide range of manifestations of ADHD symptoms. Thus, the argument could instead be made that the theory allows too many degrees of freedom. For many purposes, behavior is better defined in terms of function (e.g., consequences) than in terms of (...)
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  9. A. Charles Catania (2003). Verbal Governance, Verbal Shaping, and Attention to Verbal Stimuli. In Kennon A. Lattal (ed.), Behavior Theory and Philosophy. Springer. 301--321.
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  10. A. Charles Catania (2003). Why Behavior Should Matter to Linguists. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (6):670-672.
    Jackendoff's Foundations of Language: Brain, Meaning, Grammar, Evolution has many points of similarity with Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior, though the former emphasizes structure whereas the latter emphasizes function. The parallels are explored in the context of a selectionist account of behavior in general and of verbal behavior in particular. Part of the argument is that behavior drives evolution and therefore also drives brain organization. Another concerns itself with the nature of explanation. Recent experimental developments in behavior analysis are (...)
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  11. A. Charles Catania (2001). Selection as a Cause Versus the Causes of Selection. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (3):533-533.
    Hull et al. rightly point out the special character of selection as a causal mode, but ironically they seem to force selection back into traditional causal modes by decomposing it into replication, variation, and environmental interaction. Many processes are selective, and a taxonomy of a broad range of kinds of selection may be preferable to narrowing the applicability of the term.
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  12. A. Charles Catania (2000). Metaphors, Models, and Mathematics in the Science of Behavior. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):94-95.
    Metaphors and models involve correspondences between events in separate domains. They differ in the form and precision of how the correspondences are expressed. Examples include correspondences between phylogenic and ontogenic selection, and wave and particle metaphors of the mathematics of quantum physics. An implication is that the target article's metaphors of resistance to change may have heuristic advantages over those of momentum.
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  13. A. Charles Catania (1995). Single Words, Multiple Words, and the Functions of Language. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 18 (1):184-185.
    Wilkins & Wakefield assign importance to motor systems but skip from anatomy to cognitive structure with little attention to behavior. Organisms, no matter how sophisticated, that do not behave in accord with what they know will fall by the evolutionary wayside. Facts about behavior can supplement the authors' theory, whose hierarchical structures can accommodate an evolutionary scenario in which a million years or more of functionally varied utterances mainly limited to single words is followed by an explosion of linguistic diversity (...)
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  14. A. Charles Catania (1990). What Good is Five Percent of a Language Competence? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 13 (4):729-731.
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  15. A. Charles Catania & Eliot Shimoff (1988). Why Contingencies Won't Go Away. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (3):450.
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  16. Eliot Shimoff & A. Charles Catania (1988). Self-Control and the Panda's Thumb. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 11 (4):693.
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  17. A. Charles Catania (1986). Viewing Behaviorism Selectively. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (4):701.
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  18. A. Charles Catania (1984). Problems of Selection and Phytogeny, Terms and Methods of Behaviorism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):713.
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  19. A. Charles Catania (1984). The Operant Behaviorism of B. F. Skinner. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 7 (4):473.
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  20. A. Charles Catania (1983). Is Nonresponding Dehavior? Behavioral and Brain Sciences 6 (2):321.
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  21. A. Charles Catania (1982). Antimisrepresentationalism. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 5 (3):374.
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  22. A. Charles Catania (1980). The Explanation of Motivation and the Motivation of Explanation. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 3 (2):304.
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  23. A. Charles Catania (1978). What Constitutes Explanation in Psychology. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (1):55.
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  24. Mary Ann Fisher & A. Charles Catania (1977). Autoshaping: Relation of Feeder Color to Choice of Key Color. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 9 (6):439-442.
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  25. A. Charles Catania (1972). Chomsky's Formal Analysis of Natural Languages: A Behavioral Translation. Behaviorism 1 (1):1-15.
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