Search results for 'A. David Gordon' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. E. G. Turner, M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven, E. Boswinkel, E. P. Wegener, A. H. R. E. Paap, M. Hombert & Cl Preaux (1953). Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. I. The Warren PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. II. Einige Wiener PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. III. Some Oxford PapyriPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. IV. De Herodoti reliquiis in papyris et membranis Aegyptiis servatisPapyrologica Lugduno-Batava, edidit Institutum Papyrologicum Universitatis Lugduno-Batavae, moderantibus M. David, B. A. van Groningen, J. C. van Oven. V. Recherches sur le Recensement dans l'Egypte romaine (P. Brux. Inv. E7616)Papyrologica Lugduno-Batava,. [REVIEW] Journal of Hellenic Studies 73:163.score: 480.0
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  2. John‐Stewart Gordon (2014). Moral Philosophers Are Moral Experts! A Reply to David Archard. Bioethics 28 (4):203-206.score: 420.0
    In his article ‘Why Moral Philosophers Are Not and Should Not Be Moral Experts’ David Archard attempts to show that his argument from common-sense morality is more convincing than other competing arguments in the debate. I examine his main line of argumentation and eventually refute his main argument in my reply.
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  3. Robert Gordon, Autism and the "Theory of Mind" Debate Robert M. Gordon and John A. Barker.score: 420.0
    With this understanding, children are better able to anticipate the behavior of others and to attune their own behavior accordingly. In mentally retarded children with Down's syndrome, attainment of such competence is delayed, but it is generally acquired by the time they reach the mental age of 4, as measured by tests of nonverbal intelligence. Thus from a developmental perspective, attainment of the mental age of 4 appears to be of profound significance for acquisition of what we shall call psychological (...)
     
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  4. Thomas Frangenberg & Ludovico David (1994). The Geometry of a Dome: Ludovico David 's Dichiarazione Della Pittura Della Capella Del Collegio Clementino di Roma. Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes 57:191-208.score: 390.0
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  5. W. M. Gordon (1989). David Johnston: On a Singular Book of Cervidius Scaevola. (Freiburger Rechtsgeschichtliche Abhandlungen, N.F. 10.) Pp. 103. Berlin and Munich: Duncker & Humblot, 1987. Paper, DM 54. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 39 (01):146-147.score: 390.0
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  6. Joy Gordon (2002). United States Economic Statecraft for Survival, 1933–1991: Of Sanctions and Strategic Embargoes, Alan P. Dobson (New York: Routledge, 2002), 384 Pp., $95 Cloth.Sanctions and the Search for Security: Challenges to UN Action, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, with Linda Gerber (Boulder, Colo.: Lynne Rienner, 2002), 249 Pp., $49.95 Cloth, $18.95 Paper.Smart Sanctions: Targeting Economic Statecraft, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, Eds. (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), 276 Pp., $72 Cloth, $27.95 Paper.United States Economic Sanctions: Theory and Practice, Michael P. Malloy (New York: Kluwer Law International, 2001), 738 Pp., $212 Cloth.Economic Warfare: Sanctions, Embargo Busting, and Their Human Cost, R. T. Naylor, (Boston: Northeastern University Press, 2001), 480 Pp., $55 Cloth, $24.95 Paper.Sanctions Beyond Borders: Multinational Corporations and U.S. Economic Statecraft, Kenneth A. Rodman (Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2001), 272 Pp., $75 Cloth, $26.95 Paper. [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):177-181.score: 390.0
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  7. Joy Gordon (2002). United States Economic Statecraft for Survival, 1933–1991: Of Sanctions and Strategic Embargoes, Alan P. Dobson (New York: Routledge, 2002), 384 Pp., $95 Cloth. Sanctions and the Search for Security: Challenges to UN Action, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, with Linda Gerber (Boulder, Colo.: Lynne Rienner, 2002), 249 Pp., $49.95 Cloth, $18.95 Paper. Smart Sanctions: Targeting Economic Statecraft, David Cortright and George A. Lopez, Eds.(Lanham, Md.: Rowman & Littlefield, 2002), 276 Pp., $72 Cloth ... [REVIEW] Ethics and International Affairs 16 (2):177-181.score: 390.0
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  8. John Michael Kittross & A. David Gordon (2003). The Academy and Cyberspace Ethics. Journal of Mass Media Ethics 18 (3 & 4):286 – 307.score: 290.0
    This article discusses ethical implications for the academy in the use of cyberspace and virtual reality in conducting its teaching and research responsibilities. It identifies important cyberspace ethics concerns as they intersect with the academy and provides an ethical framework for coming to grips with them. Topics discussed here include the sine qua non of academic collegiality and civility, concerns about digital alteration of images and sounds, and issues pertaining to academic administration and infrastructure.
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  9. William Kluback, David B. Burrell, H. Kimmerle, Robert C. Roberts, Sanford Krolick, Glenn Hewitt, Merold Westphal, Haim Gordon, Brendan E. A. Liddell, Donald W. Musser & Dan Magurshak (1984). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 16 (2):165-188.score: 270.0
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  10. Brian R. Clack (1994). Robert W. Brockway. Myth From the Ice Age to Mickey Mouse. Pp. X + 187. (Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993.) $16.95.Don Cupitt. After All: Religion Without Alienation. Pp. 121. (London: SCM Press, 1994.) £9·95 Pb.Adina Davidovich. Religion as a Province of Meaning: The KantianFoundations of Modern Theology. Pp. Xvii + 338. (Minneapolis: Fortress Press, 1993.)Immanuel Kant. The One Possible Basis for a Demonstration of theExistence of God. Translated and Introduced by Gordon Treash. Pp. 247. (Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, 1994.) £11.95 Pb.William H. Poteat. The Primacy of Persons and the Language of Culture. (Essays by William H. Poteat, Edited by J. M. Nickell and J. W. Stines.) Pp. 343.(Columbia and London: University of Missouri Press, 1993.) £44·95.Luber Velecky. Aquinas' Five Arguments in the Summa Theologiae Ia 2, 3. Pp. Xi + 140. (Kampen, The Netherlands: Kok Pharos Publishing House, 1994.) Dfl. 65.David Wisdo. The Life of Irony and the Ethics O. [REVIEW] Religious Studies 30 (4):539.score: 81.0
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  11. David Bakhurst, F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky & V. V. Davydov (1995). Social Being and the Human Essence: An Unresolved Issue in Soviet Philosophy. A Dialogue with Russian Philosophers Conducted by David Bakhurst. Studies in East European Thought 47 (1/2):3 - 60.score: 60.0
    This is a transcription of a debate on the concept of a person conducted in Moscow in 1983. David Bakhurst argues that Evald Ilyenkov's social constructivist conception of personhood, founded on Marx's thesis that the human essence is 'the ensemble of social relations', is either false or trivially true. F. T. Mikhailov, V. S. Bibler, V. A. Lektorsky and V. V. Davydov critically assess Bakhurst's arguments, elucidate and contextualize Ilyenkov's views, and defend, in contrasting ways, the claim that (...)
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  12. Anthony Skelton (2013). Sidgwick’s Argument for Utilitarianism and His Moral Epistemology: A Reply to David Phillips. Revue d'Etudes Benthamiennes 12.score: 54.0
    David Phillips’s Sidgwickian Ethics is a penetrating contribution to the scholarly and philosophical understanding of Henry Sidgwick’s The Methods of Ethics. This note focuses on Phillips’s understanding of (aspects of) Sidgwick’s argument for utilitarianism and the moral epistemology to which he subscribes. In § I, I briefly outline the basic features of the argument that Sidgwick provides for utilitarianism, noting some disagreements with Phillips along the way. In § II, I raise some objections to Phillips’s account of the epistemology (...)
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  13. José L. Tasset (2013). Razones para una buena muerte (La justificación de la eutanasia en la tradición utilitarista: De David Hume a Peter Singer). Télos 18 (1-2):153-195.score: 54.0
    There are good moral reasons to support euthanasia, and these reasons are fundamentally of a utilitarian root. There are few moral reasons to oppose euthanasia in its strict sense, and they are clearly outweighed by the reasons argumented from a utilitarian perspective. Such teleological and consequentialist good reasons were originally advanced by David Hume in his brief and brilliant essay "Of Suicide" (1757), the true source for current Bioethics. Hume's arguments have been expanded in scope by some contemporary utilitarians, (...)
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  14. Karl E. Peters (2013). A Christian Naturalism: Developing the Thinking of Gordon Kaufman. Zygon 48 (3):578-591.score: 54.0
    This essay develops a theological naturalism using Gordon Kaufman's nonpersonal idea of God as serendipitous creativity in contrast to the personal metaphorical theology of Sallie McFague. It then develops a Christian theological naturalism by using Kaufman's idea of historical trajectories, specifically Jesus trajectory1 and Jesus trajectory2. The first is the trajectory in the early Christian church assuming a personal God in the framework of Greek philosophy that results in the Trinity. The second is the naturalistic-humanistic trajectory of creativity (God) (...)
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  15. Deborah Cheney (2010). Dr Mary Louisa Gordon (1861–1941): A Feminist Approach in Prison. [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 18 (2):115-136.score: 54.0
    This article discusses the work of Dr Mary Louisa Gordon, who was appointed as the first English Lady Inspector of Prisons in 1908, and remained in post until 1921. Her attitude towards and treatment of women prisoners, as explained in her 1922 book Penal Discipline, stands in sharp contrast to that of her male contemporaries, and the categorisation of her approach as ‘feminist’ is reinforced by her documented connections with the suffragette movement. Yet her feminist and suffragist associations also (...)
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  16. Jennifer A. Herdt (2012). David Hume: A Dissertation on the Passions; The Natural History of Religion. Hume Studies 36 (2):233-235.score: 51.0
    The present volume is the fifth out of eight total projected for the Clarendon Edition of the Works of David Hume. Its editor, Tom Beauchamp, is one of the general editors of the Clarendon Hume, together with David Fate Norton and M. A. Stewart. Beauchamp served as the editor for the Clarendon editions of An Enquiry concerning the Principle of Morals (1998) and An Enquiry concerning Human Understanding (2000), both of which have garnered critical acclaim. Like the previous (...)
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  17. David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2007). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature (Two-Volume Set). Clarendon Press.score: 51.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of Hume's Treatise, one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This set comprises the two volumes of texts and editorial material, which are also available for purchase separately. -/- David Hume (1711 - 1776) is one of the greatest of philosophers. Today he probably ranks highest of all British philosophers in terms of influence and philosophical standing. His philosophical work ranges across morals, the mind, metaphysics, epistemology, religion, and (...)
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  18. A. Tellings (1998). A Virtue Approach Instead of a Kantian Approach as a Solution to Major Dilemmas in Meta-Ethics? A Criticism of David Carr. Studies in Philosophy and Education 17 (1):47-56.score: 51.0
    This contribution is a criticism of some points David Carr brings forward both in his 1991 book (Educating the Virtues) but even more so in his 1996 article in this journal (After Kohlberg: Some Implications of an Ethics of Virtue for the Theory of Moral Education and Development). With the help of a virtue approach Carr tries to solve the moral objectivism-moral relativism dilemma and the deontologism-consequentialism dilemma in ethics. I will argue that his attempt, though very interesting, suffers (...)
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  19. David Nikkel (2010). A Response to David Rutledge. Tradition and Discovery 37 (2):16-19.score: 51.0
    This appreciative response to David Rutledge’s review of my book, Radical Embodiment, deals with the natureof categorization/generalization with respect to and in light of postmodernism, with the issue of the articulation of tacit knowledge, with Mark C. Taylor’s current a/theological stance regarding the concept of God, and finally with my model of divine embodiment that rejects special providence and revelation.
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  20. David Hume, David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2007). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts. Clarendon Press.score: 51.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature (1739/40), followed by the short Abstract (1740) in which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh (1745), Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers seeking (...)
     
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  21. David Hume, David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2007). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 2: Editorial Material. Clarendon Press.score: 51.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This second volume begins with their 'Historical Account' of the Treatise, an account that runs from the beginnings of the work to the period immediately following Hume's death in 1776, followed by an account of the Nortons' editorial procedures and policies and a record of the differences between the first-edition text of the Treatise and the critical text that follows. The volume (...)
     
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  22. David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2011). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 1: Texts. OUP Oxford.score: 51.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This first volume contains the critical text of David Hume's Treatise of Human Nature (1739/40), followed by the short Abstract (1740) in which Hume set out the key arguments of the larger work; the volume concludes with A Letter from a Gentleman to his Friend in Edinburgh (1745), Hume's defence of the Treatise when it was under attack from ministers seeking (...)
     
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  23. David Fate Norton & Mary J. Norton (eds.) (2011). David Hume: A Treatise of Human Nature: Volume 2: Editorial Material. OUP Oxford.score: 51.0
    David and Mary Norton present the definitive scholarly edition of one of the greatest philosophical works ever written. This second volume begins with their 'Historical Account' of the Treatise, an account that runs from the beginnings of the work to the period immediately following Hume's death in 1776, followed by an account of the Nortons' editorial procedures and policies and a record of the differences between the first-edition text of the Treatise and the critical text that follows. The volume (...)
     
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  24. Mike Thicke (2013). REVIEW: David Tyfield, The Economics of Science: A Critical Realist Overview, Volumes 1 and 2. [REVIEW] Spontaneous Generations: A Journal for the History and Philosophy of Science 7 (1):94-96.score: 51.0
    David Tyfield’s two-volume The Economics of Science is an ambitious and valuable attempt to explain recent developments in economics of science using a critical realist/Marxian framework, and at the same time to unite critical realism with science and technology studies.
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  25. Jeremy Joyner White & John A. Gueguen (1998). A Humean Critique of David Hume's Theory of Knowledge. University Press of America.score: 51.0
    A Humean Critique of David Hume's Theory of Knowledge provides the first full-length Aristotilian-Thomistic critique of Hume's most mature and familiar work.
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  26. Francis J. Beckwith (2006). Defending Abortion Philosophically: A Review of David Boonin's a Defense of Abortion. [REVIEW] Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 31 (2):177 – 203.score: 48.0
    This article is a critical review of David Boonin's book, A Defense of Abortion (Cambridge University Press, 2002), a significant contribution to the literature on this subject and arguably the most important monograph on abortion published in the past twenty years. Boonin's defense of abortion consists almost exclusively of sophisticated critiques of a wide variety of pro-life arguments, including ones that are rarely defended by pro-life advocates. This article offers a brief presentation of the book's contents with extended assessments (...)
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  27. Robin P. Cubitt & Robert Sugden (2003). Common Knowledge, Salience and Convention: A Reconstruction of David Lewis' Game Theory. Economics and Philosophy 19 (2):175-210.score: 48.0
    David Lewis is widely credited with the first formulation of common knowledge and the first rigorous analysis of convention. However, common knowledge and convention entered mainstream game theory only when they were formulated, later and independently, by other theorists. As a result, some of the most distinctive and valuable features of Lewis' game theory have been overlooked. We re-examine this theory by reconstructing key parts in a more formal way, extending it, and showing how it differs from more recent (...)
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  28. Charles Pigden & Rebecca E. B. Entwisle (2012). Spread Worlds, Plenitude and Modal Realism: A Problem for David Lewis. In James Maclaurin (ed.), Rationis Defensor.score: 48.0
    In his metaphysical summa of 1986, The Plurality of Worlds, David Lewis famously defends a doctrine he calls ‘modal realism’, the idea that to account for the fact that some things are possible and some things are necessary we must postulate an infinity possible worlds, concrete entities like our own universe, but cut off from us in space and time. Possible worlds are required to account for the facts of modality without assuming that modality is primitive – that there (...)
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  29. Michael Ruse (2011). Making Room for Faith in an Age of Science: A Response to David Wisdo. Zygon 46 (3):655-672.score: 48.0
    Abstract. I respond to the criticisms of David Wisdo of my position on the relationship between science and religion. I argue that although he gives a full and fair account of my position, he fails to grasp fully my use of the metaphorical basis of modern science in my argument that, because of its mechanistic commitment, there are some questions that science not only does not answer but that science does not even attempt to answer. Hence, my position stands (...)
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  30. Wilfried Sieg & Mark Ravaglia, David Hilbert and Paul Bernays, Grundlagen der Mathematik I and II: A Landmark.score: 48.0
    Wilfred Sieg and Mark Ravaglia. David Hilbert and Paul Bernays, Grundlagen der Mathematik I and II: A Landmark.
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  31. Michael Ruse (2010). David Hull: A Memoir. Biology and Philosophy 25 (5):739-747.score: 48.0
    David Hull: a memoir Content Type Journal Article DOI 10.1007/s10539-010-9236-0 Authors Michael Ruse, Department of Philosophy, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32306, USA Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
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  32. Knud Haakonssen (1981). The Science of a Legislator: The Natural Jurisprudence of David Hume and Adam Smith. Cambridge University Press.score: 48.0
    Combining the methods of the modern philosopher with those of the historian of ideas, Knud Haakonssen presents an interpretation of the philosophy of law which Adam Smith developed out of - and partly in response to - David Hume's theory of justice. While acknowledging that the influences on Smith were many and various, Dr Haakonssen suggests that the decisive philosophical one was Hume's analysis of justice in A Treatise of Human Nature and the second Enquiry. He therefore begins with (...)
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  33. Peter Slezak (1994). A Second Look at David Bloor's: Knowledge and Social Imagery. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 24 (3):336-361.score: 48.0
    The recent republication of David Bloor's Knowledge and Social Imagery in a second edition provides an occasion to reappraise the celebrated work which launched the so-called Strong Programme in the sociology of scientific knowledge. This work embodies the general outlook and foundational principles in a way that is still characteristic of its descendents. Above all, the recent republication of Bloor's original book is evidence of the continuing interest and importance of the work, but it also provides the clearest evidence (...)
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  34. Sandra D. Hojniak (2011). David E. Fisher: Much Ado About (Practically) Nothing. A History of the Noble Gases. [REVIEW] Foundations of Chemistry 13 (2):167-169.score: 48.0
    David E. Fisher: Much Ado about (Practically) Nothing. A History of the Noble Gases Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-3 DOI 10.1007/s10698-011-9114-0 Authors Sandra D. Hojniak, Department of Chemistry, Laboratory of Coordination Chemistry, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, Celestijnenlaan 200F, 3001 Leuven, Belgium Journal Foundations of Chemistry Online ISSN 1572-8463 Print ISSN 1386-4238.
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  35. Steven M. Rosen (1986). Time and Higher-Order Wholeness: A Response to David Bohm. In David Ray Griffin (ed.), Physics and the Ultimate Significance of Time. State University of New York Press. 219--230.score: 48.0
    This paper explores the meaning of time from three points of view: (1) David Bohm’s concepts of ‘vertical implicate order’ and ‘holomovement’; (2) Alfred North Whitehead’s idea of the ‘actual occasion’; and (3) the author’s notion of ‘nondual duality.’ The author argues that Bohm and Whitehead alike implicitly divide time into dual and nondual aspects and that, in failing to adequately reconcile these, time, in effect, is denied. The alternative offered seeks to thoroughly integrate dual and nondual (holistic) modalities (...)
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  36. Anne Zavalkoff (2004). Dis/Located in Nature? A Feminist Critique of David Abram. Ethics and the Environment 9 (1):121-139.score: 48.0
    : This paper draws on Mary Daly's creative, connective use of the written word to challenge David Abram's central argument in The Spell of the Sensuous: that alphabetic writing and literacy are primarily responsible both for dulling human sensory perception and for severing a deep connection between humans and the natural world. It does so by outlining Abram's central claim, investigating the parallels and important differences between Abram's and Daly's work, and examining the strategies for reconnecting with the living (...)
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  37. Tomis Kapitan (1997). Acting and the Open Future: A Brief Rejoinder to David Hunt. Religious Studies 33 (3):287-292.score: 48.0
    I have argued that since (i) intentional agency requires intention-acquisition, (ii) intentionacquisition implies a sense of an open future, and (iii) a sense of an open future is incompatible with complete foreknowledge, then (iv) no agent can be omniscient. Alternatively, an omniscient being is omniimpotent.i David Hunt continues to oppose this reasoning, most recently, in Religious Studies 32 (March 1996). It is increasingly clear that the debate turns on larger issues concerning necessity and knowledge, but let me here offer (...)
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  38. Christian Coseru (2007). A Review of Buddhism, Virtue, and Environment, by David E. Cooper and Simon P. James. [REVIEW] Sophia 46 (2):75-77.score: 48.0
    Do Buddhist ‘moral’ principles, such as generosity, equanimity, and compassion, consistently map onto Greek and, more generally, Western ‘virtues’? In other words, is it at all possible to talk about a Buddhist ‘virtue ethics’? Should equanimity, for instance, be understood as having the same function in Buddhist moral thought as temperance has for Plato, Aristotle, or the Stoics? Does the Buddha’s effort to embody certain cardinal virtues (sīla) resemble the classical Greek and Roman pursuit of a life of personal flourishing (...)
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  39. S. Olsaretti (2013). Coercion and Libertarianism: A Reply to Gordon Barnes. Analysis 73 (2):295-299.score: 48.0
    Libertarians oppose coercion and champion a free-market society. Are these two commitments, as libertarians claim, wholly consistent with one another, or is there, by contrast, a tension between them? This paper defends the latter view. Replying to an article by Gordon Barnes, the paper casts doubts on the success of an argument aimed at establishing that, while coercion is justice-disrupting, all non-coercive but forced transactions that occur in a free market are justice-preserving.
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  40. Jordan Howard Sobel (2008). Walls and Vaults: A Natural Science of Morals (Virtue Ethics According to David Hume). John Wiley & Sons, Inc..score: 48.0
    The work is a charitable study on what the internationally renowned presenter and author, Howard Sobel, views to be largely the truth about moral thought and talk. Discussions and observations from David Humes own writings oftentimes reinforce and elaborate the authors notions and there is an assertive attempt to weave logical thinking into the book. Applications to such mathematical concepts as game theory, decision-making, and conditionals are dispersed throughout so as to enlighten the theory behind the ideas.
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  41. Walter E. Block, 35. “David Friedman and Libertarianism: A Critique”.score: 48.0
    David Friedman attacks deontological or principled libertarianism from a utilitarian point of view. The present essay is an attempt to refute his critique of this philosophy, and to cast aspersions on the utilitarian version of libertarianism he favors.
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  42. Noel Castree & Derek Gregory (eds.) (2006). David Harvey: A Critical Reader. Blackwell Pub..score: 48.0
    This book critically interrogates the work of David Harvey, one of the world’s most influential geographers, and one of its best known Marxists. Considers the entire range of Harvey’s oeuvre, from the nature of urbanism to environmental issues. Written by contributors from across the human sciences, operating with a range of critical theories. Focuses on key themes in Harvey’s work. Contains a consolidated bibliography of Harvey’s writings.
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  43. Adolf Grünbaum (2010). David Malament and the Conventionality of Simultaneity: A Reply. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 40 (9-10):1285-1297.score: 48.0
    In 1977, David Malament proved the valuable technical result that the simultaneity relation of standard synchrony $\epsilon=\frac{1}{2}$ with respect to an inertial observer O is uniquely definable in terms of the relation κ of causal connectibility. And he claimed that this definability undermines my own version of the conventionality of metrical simultaneity within an inertial frame.But Malament’s proof depends on the imposition of several supposedly “innocuous” constraints on any candidate for the simultaneity relation relative to O. Relying on Allen (...)
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  44. Frederik Herzberg (2010). The Consistency of Probabilistic Regresses. A Reply to Jeanne Peijnenburg and David Atkinson. Studia Logica 94 (3):331 - 345.score: 48.0
    In a recent paper, Jeanne Peijnenburg and David Atkinson [ Studia Logica , 89(3):333-341 (2008)] have challenged the foundationalist rejection of infinitism by giving an example of an infinite, yet explicitly solvable regress of probabilistic justification. So far, however, there has been no criterion for the consistency of infinite probabilistic regresses, and in particular, foundationalists might still question the consistency of the solvable regress proposed by Peijnenburg and Atkinson.
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  45. Derek Matravers (2005). Two Comments and a Problem for David Davies' Performance Theory. Acta Analytica 20 (4):32-40.score: 48.0
    This paper considers the view, recently put forward by David Davies in Art and Performance , that works of art should be identified with the generative performances that result in the object, rather than with the object. It attempts to disarm two of Davies arguments by, first, providing a criterion by which the contextualist can accommodate all and only the relevant generative properties as properties of the work, and, second, providing an alternative explanation for his modal intuitions. Finally, it (...)
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  46. David A. Nicolas, David A. NICOLAS [Back to Homepage].score: 48.0
    In ‘Essential stuff’ (2008) and ‘Stuff’ (2009), Kristie Miller argues that two generally accepted theses, often formulated as follows, are incompatible: - (Temporal) mereological essentialism for stuff (or matter), the thesis that any portion of stuff has the same parts at every time it exists.
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  47. Tomis Kapitan (1994). The Incompatibility of Omniscience and Intentional Action: A Reply to David P. Hunt. Religious Studies 30 (1):55 - 66.score: 48.0
    In "Omniprescient Agency" (Religious Studies 28, 1992) David P. Hunt challenges an argument against the possibility of an omniscient agent. The argument—my own in "Agency and Omniscience" (Religious Studies 27, 1991)—assumes that an agent is a being capable of intentional action, where, minimally, an action is intentional only if it is caused, in part, by the agent's intending. The latter, I claimed, is governed by a psychological principle of "least effort," viz., that no one intends without antecedently feeling that (...)
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  48. K. B. Wharton (2010). A Novel Interpretation of the Klein-Gordon Equation. Foundations of Physics 40 (3):313-332.score: 48.0
    The covariant Klein-Gordon equation requires twice the boundary conditions of the Schrödinger equation and does not have an accepted single-particle interpretation. Instead of interpreting its solution as a probability wave determined by an initial boundary condition, this paper considers the possibility that the solutions are determined by both an initial and a final boundary condition. By constructing an invariant joint probability distribution from the size of the solution space, it is shown that the usual measurement probabilities can nearly be (...)
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  49. Maria Pia Paganelli (2009). David Hume on Monetary Policy: A Retrospective Approach. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 7 (1):65-85.score: 48.0
    Monetary policy is a modern idea of which David Hume is generally considered a precursor. Moreover, thanks to Milton Friedman and Robert Lucas, he is often presented as one of the first and most illustrious endorser of monetarism. This paper argues against this view, and in agreement with Joseph Schumpeter, that Hume's contribution to economics, while not insignificant, cannot claim any real novelties. It offers an interpretation of Hume as a descendant of a pre-modern understanding of money rather than (...)
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  50. O. Schulte (2000). Discussion. What to Believe and What to Take Seriously: A Reply to David Chart Concerning the Riddle of Induction. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 51 (1):151-153.score: 48.0
    In his commentary on my paper, “Means-Ends Epistemology”, David Chart constructs a Riddle of Induction with the following feature: Means-ends analysis, as I formulated it in the paper, selects “all emeralds are grue” as the optimal conjecture after observing a sample of all green emeralds. Chart’s construction is rigorous and correct. If we disagree, it is in the philosophical morals to be drawn from his example. Such morals are best discussed by elucidating some of the larger epistemological issues involved. (...)
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