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Andrew Edgar [60]Andrew Robert Edgar [7]A. Edgar [5]
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Profile: Andrew Edgar (Cardiff University)
  1.  16
    Andrew Edgar (2013). Sport and Art: An Essay in The Hermeneutics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):1 - 9.
    (2013). Sport and Art: an Essay in The Hermeneutics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 1-9. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761879.
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  2.  20
    David Hume, Stephen Copley & Andrew Edgar (1993). Selected Essays. Monograph Collection (Matt - Pseudo).
    In his writings, David Hume set out to bridge the gap between the learned world of the academy and the marketplace of polite society. This collection, drawing largely on his Essays Moral, Political, and Literary, which was even more popular than his famous Treatise of Human Nature, comprehensively shows how far he succeeded. From `Of Essay Writing' to `Of the Rise and Progress of the Arts and Sciences' Hume embraces a staggering range of social, cultural, political, demographic, and historical concerns. (...)
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  3. Andrew Edgar, Celia Kitzinger & Jenny Kitzinger (2015). Interpreting Chronic Disorders of Consciousness: Medical Science and Family Experience. Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 21 (3):374-379.
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  4. Andrew Edgar (1998). Bowling, A.: 1997, Measuring Health; a Review of Quality of Life Measurement Scales (2nd Ed.). [REVIEW] Medicine, Healthcare and Philosophy 1 (2):181-182.
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  5.  30
    Andrew Edgar (2009). The Hermeneutic Challenge of Genetic Engineering: Habermas and the Transhumanists. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 12 (2):157-167.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the impact that developments in transhumanist technologies may have upon human cultures, and to do so by exploring a potential debate between Habermas and the transhumanists. Transhumanists, such as Nick Bostrom, typically see the potential in genetic and other technologies for positively expanding and transcending human nature. In contrast, Habermas is a representative of those who are fearful of this technology, suggesting that it will compound the deleterious effects of the colonisation of (...)
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  6.  24
    Andrew Edgar (2004). A Response to Nordenfelt's “The Varieties of Dignity”. Health Care Analysis 12 (2):83-89.
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  7.  3
    Stephen Pattison & Andrew Edgar (forthcoming). Prospects for Flourishing in Contemporary Health Care. Health Care Analysis:1-4.
    This special issue of Health Care Analysis originated in an conference, held in Birmingham in 2014, and organised by the group Think about Health. We introduce the issue by briefly reviewing the understandings of the concept of ‘flourishing’, and introducing the contributory papers, before offering some reflections on the remaining issues that reflection on flourishing poses for health care provision.
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  8.  3
    Andrew Edgar & Stephen Pattison (forthcoming). Flourishing in Health Care. Health Care Analysis:1-13.
    The purpose of this paper is to offer an account of ‘flourishing’ that is relevant to health care provision, both in terms of the flourishing of the individual patient and carer, and in terms of the flourishing of the caring institution. It is argued that, unlike related concepts such as ‘happiness’, ‘well-being’ or ‘quality of life’, ‘flourishing’ uniquely has the power to capture the importance of the vulnerability of human being. Drawing on the likes of Heidegger and Nussbaum, it is (...)
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  9.  7
    Søren Holm & Andrew Robert Edgar (2008). Best Interest: A Philosophical Critique. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (3):197-207.
    On one conception of “best interest” there can only be one course of action in a given situation that is in a person’s best interest. In this paper we will first consider what theories of “best interest” and rational decision-making that can lead to this conclusion and explore some of the less commonly appreciated implications of these theories. We will then move on to consider what ethical theories that are compatible with such a view and explore their implications. In the (...)
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  10.  2
    Andrew Edgar (2005). Philosophy of Habermas. Acumen.
    Critical overview of the work of Jurgen Habermas, discussing his contributions to both philosophy and social theory.
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  11.  11
    Andrew Edgar & Stephen Pattison (2011). Integrity and the Moral Complexity of Professional Practice. Nursing Philosophy 12 (2):94-106.
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  12.  2
    Andrew Robert Edgar (2011). Professional Values, Aesthetic Values, and the Ends of Trade. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (2):195-201.
    Professionalism is initially understood as a historical process, through which certain commercial services sought to improve their social status (and economic reward) by separating themselves from mere crafts or trades. This process may be traced clearly with the aspiration of British portrait painters (headed by Sir Joshua Reynolds), in the eighteenth century, to acquire a social status akin to that of already established professionals, such as clerics and doctors. This may be understood, to a significant degree, as a process of (...)
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  13.  50
    A. Edgar (2012). Sport as Liturgy: Towards a Radical Orthodoxy of Sport. Studies in Christian Ethics 25 (1):20-34.
    The purpose of this paper is to suggest that sport can be understood as a form of engagement with the fundamental contingency and vulnerability of the human condition, and as such that it expresses a yearning for meaning in a modern society that offers only the illusion of meaning. Sport, at its most profound, is argued to be a negative liturgy, in the sense that it highlights an absence of meaning, rather than offering a positive alternative. The paper draws on (...)
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  14.  2
    Andrew Edgar (2009). The Challenge of Transplants to an Intersubjectively Established Sense of Personal Identity. Health Care Analysis 17 (2):123-133.
    Face transplants have been performed, in a small number, since 2005. Popular concern over the morality of the face transplant has tended to focus on the role that one’s face plays in one’s sense of self or one’s personal identity. In order to address this concern, the current paper will explore the significance of face transplants in the light of a theory of the self that draws on symbolic interactionism, narrative theory, and accounts of embodiment. The paper will respond to (...)
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  15.  26
    Andrew Edgar (2013). The Aesthetics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):80 - 99.
    (2013). The Aesthetics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 80-99. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761885.
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  16.  9
    A. Edgar & S. Pattison (2006). Need Humanities Be so Useless? Justifying the Place and Role of Humanities as a Critical Resource for Performance and Practice. Medical Humanities 32 (2):92-98.
    Justifying the existence, position, and relevance of academic humanities scholarship may be difficult in the face of chronic practical needs in health care. Such scholarship may seem parasitic on human activity and performance that directly contributes to human wellbeing and health care. Here, a possible and partial justification for the importance of scholarship in the humanities as a critical resource for practice and performance is undertaken by two humanities scholars. Human identity and emotion are reflected and defined by performances, both (...)
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  17.  59
    Andrew Edgar (1990). An Introduction to Adorno's Aesthetics. British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (1):46-56.
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  18.  29
    A. Edgar (2012). Who Needs Classical Music? Cultural Choice and Musical Value. British Journal of Aesthetics 52 (2):209-211.
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  19.  7
    Andrew Edgar (2003). Velázquez and the Representation of Dignity. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 6 (2):111-121.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the visual representation of dignity, through the particular example of the seventeenth century Spanish painter Diego Velázquez. Velázquez works at a point in Western history when modern conceptions of dignity are beginning to be formed. It is argued that Velázquez' portraits of royalty and aristocracy articulate a tension between a feudal conception of majesty and a modern conception of the dignity of merit. On this level, modern conceptions of dignity of merit are (...)
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  20.  4
    A. Edgar (1998). Health Care Allocation, Public Consultation and the Concept of 'Health'. Health Care Analysis 6 (3):193-198.
    By comparing models of market-based allocation with state-controlled national health care systems, it will be suggested that the way in which different communicaties deal with the allocation of health care is central to their expression of what might be called a moral self-understanding. That is to say that the provision of health care may be expected to be a focus of communal debate, not simply about morally acceptable and unacceptable actions, but also about the community’s understanding of what it is (...)
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  21. Andrew Edgar (2005). The Expert Patient: Illness as Practice. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 8 (2):165-171.
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  22.  12
    Andrew Edgar (2013). Sport and Philosophy. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):10 - 29.
    (2013). Sport and Philosophy. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 10-29. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761882.
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  23. Andrew Edgar (1999). Culture and Criticism: Adorno. In Simon Glendinning (ed.), The Edinburgh Encylopedia of Continental Philosophy. Edinburgh University Press
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  24.  9
    Andrew Edgar (2013). The Beauty of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):100 - 120.
    (2013). The Beauty of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 100-120. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761886.
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  25.  4
    Andrew Robert Edgar & S. Pattison (2011). The Problem with Integrity. Nursing Philosophy 12 (2):81-82.
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  26.  19
    Andrew Edgar (2007). Sport as Strategic Action: A Habermasian Perspective. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 1 (1):33 – 46.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the moral status of sport through a conceptual structure borrowed from Jürgen Habermas's philosophy and social theory. Habermas distinguishes between communicative and strategic action as two ways in which social action may be coordinated. While the former relies on the building of mutual understanding between social agents, the latter entails one agent manipulating others, as if they were mere objects to be treated instrumentally. In an initial model of sporting practice, it is (...)
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  27.  5
    Andrew Robert Edgar (2011). The Uncanny, Alienation and Strangeness: The Entwining of Political and Medical Metaphor. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 14 (3):313-322.
    This paper offers a critical response to Fredrik Svenaeus’ use of the Heideggerian uncanny to analyse the experience of illness. It is argued that the uncanny is part of a culture of concepts through which the condition of modernity has been analysed by philosophers, social theorists, writers and artists. All centre upon the idea of alienation, and thus not being at home in the society that should be one’s home. This association will be exploited to offer a reinterpretation of Svenaeus’ (...)
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  28.  15
    Andrew Edgar (2007). The Art of Useless Suffering. Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 10 (4):95-405.
    The purpose of this paper is to explore the role that modernism in the arts might have in articulating the uselessness and incomprehensibility of physical and mental suffering. It is argued that the experience of illness is frequently resistant to interpretation, and as such, it will be suggested, to conventional forms of artistic expression and communication. Conventional narratives, and other beautiful or conventionally expressive aesthetic structures, that presuppose the possibility and desirability of an harmonious and meaningful resolution to conflicts and (...)
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  29.  11
    Andrew Edgar (2013). The Dominance of Big Pharma: Power. [REVIEW] Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 16 (2):295-304.
    The purpose of this paper is to provide a normative model for the assessment of the exercise of power by Big Pharma. By drawing on the work of Steven Lukes, it will be argued that while Big Pharma is overtly highly regulated, so that its power is indeed restricted in the interests of patients and the general public, the industry is still able to exercise what Lukes describes as a third dimension of power. This entails concealing the conflicts of interest (...)
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  30.  18
    Andrew Edgar (1999). Adorno and Musical Analysis. Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (4):439-449.
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  31.  13
    Andrew Edgar (1990). Book Reviews. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (2):196-198.
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  32.  1
    Andrew Edgar (2015). Football and the Poetics of Space. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 9 (2):153-165.
    This paper explores space as a core source of aesthetic pleasure in various codes of football. The paper begins by applying Kant’s distinction between the agreeable and the pleasurable to sport, arguing that the appreciation of sport entails more than just excitement. Pleasure comes from an appreciation of the rules, strategies and history of the game. The significance of the rules of various codes of football in articulating our experience of space will be taken as fundamental to such appreciation. Drawing (...)
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  33.  1
    Andrew Edgar, Adorno and the Question of Schubert's Sexuality.
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  34.  7
    Andrew Edgar (2013). A Hermeneutics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):140 - 167.
    (2013). A Hermeneutics of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 140-167. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2012.761893.
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  35.  4
    Andrew Edgar (2013). Conclusion. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):168 - 171.
    (2013). Conclusion. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 168-171. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761895.
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  36.  4
    Andrew Edgar (2013). The Modernism of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):121 - 139.
    (2013). The Modernism of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 121-139. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2012.761887.
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  37.  4
    Andrew Edgar (2005). Sport, Rules and Values: Philosophical Investigations Into the Nature of Sport By Graham McFee. Published 2004 by Routledge, London and New York. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 32 (1):119-121.
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  38.  3
    Andrew Edgar (2013). The Birth of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy 7 (1):55 - 79.
    (2013). The Birth of Sport. Sport, Ethics and Philosophy: Vol. 7, Sport and Art: An Essay in the Hermeneutics of Sport, pp. 55-79. doi: 10.1080/17511321.2013.761883.
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  39.  1
    Andrew Edgar (1994). Confidentiality and Personal Integrity. Nursing Ethics 1 (2):86-95.
    This paper uses the social theory of Erving Goffman in order to argue that confidentiality should be understood in relation to the mundane social skills by which individuals present and respect specific self-images of themselves and others during social interaction. The breaching of confidentiality is analysed in terms of one person's capacity to embarrass another, and so to expose that person as incompetent. Respecting confidentiality may at once serve to protect the vulnerable from an unjust society, and yet also protect (...)
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  40.  6
    Andrew Edgar (1995). Enterprise Association or Civil Association? The Uk National Health Service. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 20 (6):669-688.
    This paper falls into three parts. In the first part I will briefly review the current process of reform that the United Kingdom National Health Service is undergoing. Two fundamental motivations for reform, the desire for increased efficiency and for an increased responsiveness to patients' needs and preferences will be discussed in greater detail. The second part attempts to provide a perspective on the moral debate concerning health care reform by introducing the distinction between ‘civil association’ and ‘enterprise association’ as (...)
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  41.  2
    Andrew Edgar (2012). The Aesthetics of The Olympic Art Competitions. Journal of the Philosophy of Sport 39 (2):185-199.
    In the Olympic Art Competitions (1912?1948) Pierre de Coubertin expresses his conception of both sport and art as instruments of moral renewal. In this paper, this conception is criticised for failing to appreciate art and sport as necessary manifestations of modernism. The Art Competitions were informed by a traditionalist aesthetic, and thus played a highly conservative role within Olympism. A modernist art about sport, in contrast, would have been a source of critical reflection, potentially protecting the Olympic movement from corrupting (...)
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  42.  3
    Andrew Edgar (1995). Discourse Ethics and Paternalism. Social Philosophy Today 11:253-269.
  43. Andrew Edgar (2004). Alexander Broadie, Ed., The Cambridge Companion to The Scottish Enlightenment Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 24 (2):86-89.
     
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  44. Andrew Edgar, Adorno and the Frankurt School.
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  45. Andrew Edgar, Sam Salek, Darren Shickle, David Cohen & Paul Menzel (1999). Book Reviews-The Ethical QALY: Ethical Issues in Healthcare Resource Allocations. Bioethics 13 (5):436.
     
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  46. Andrew Edgar (1995). Communitarianism and its Critics. Philosophical Books 36 (1):66-67.
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  47. Andrew Edgar & Stephen Pattison (2008). Guest Editorial. Genomics, Society and Policy 4:ii-iii.
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  48. Andrew Edgar (2005). Habermas: A Very Short Introduction. [REVIEW] Radical Philosophy 133.
     
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  49. A. Edgar (1998). Health Care Allocation, Public Consultation and the Concept of ‘Health’. Health Care Analysis 6 (3):193-198.
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  50. Andrew Edgar (1990). "Intellectuals in Power: A Genealogy of Critical Humanism": Paul A. Bové. [REVIEW] British Journal of Aesthetics 30 (2):196.
     
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