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Profile: Andy Fine
  1.  55
    Arthur Fine (1996). The Shaky Game: Einstein, Realism, and the Quantum Theory. University of Chicago Press.
    In this new edition, Arthur Fine looks at Einstein's philosophy of science and develops his own views on realism. A new Afterword discusses the reaction to Fine's own theory. "What really led Einstein . . . to renounce the new quantum order? For those interested in this question, this book is compulsory reading."--Harvey R. Brown, American Journal of Physics "Fine has successfully combined a historical account of Einstein's philosophical views on quantum mechanics and a discussion of some of the philosophical (...)
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  2.  9
    Alex B. Fine & T. Florian Jaeger (2013). Evidence for Implicit Learning in Syntactic Comprehension. Cognitive Science 37 (3):578-591.
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  3. Arthur Fine (1986). Unnatural Attitudes: Realist and Instrumentalist Attachments to Science. Mind 95 (378):149-179.
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  4.  69
    Arthur I. Fine (1984). The Natural Ontological Attitude. In J. Leplin (ed.), Scientific Realism. University of California Press 261--77.
  5.  37
    Arthur Fine (1993). Fictionalism. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 18 (1):1-18.
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  6.  9
    Alex B. Fine & T. Florian Jaeger (2013). Evidence for Implicit Learning in Syntactic Comprehension. Cognitive Science 37 (3):578-591.
  7. Arthur Fine (1989). Correlations and Efficiency: Testing the Bell Inequalities. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 19 (5):453-478.
    This paper examines the efficiency problem involved in experimental tests of so-called “local” hidden variables. It separates the phenomenological locality at issue in the Bell case from Einstein's different conception of locality, and shows how phenomenological locality also differs from the factorizability needed to derive the Bell inequalities in the stochastic case. It then pursues the question of whether factorizable, local models (or, equivalently, deterministic ones) exist for the experiments designed to test the Bell inequalities, thus rendering the experimental argument (...)
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  8.  0
    Alan Fine (1988). The Ethics of Fetal Tissue Transplants. Hastings Center Report 18 (3):5-8.
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  9.  64
    Arthur Fine (1991). Inequalities for Nonideal Correlation Experiments. Foundations of Physics 21 (3):365-378.
    This paper addresses the “inefficiency loophole” in the Bell theorem. We examine factorizable stochastic models for the Bell inequalities, where we allow the detection efficiency to depend both on the “hidden” state of the measured system and also its passage through an analyzer. We show that, nevertheless, if the efficiency functions are symmetric between the two wings of the experiment, one can dispense with supplementary assumptions and derive new inequalities that enable the models to be tested even for highly inefficient (...)
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  10.  74
    Arthur Fine & Paul Teller (1978). Algebraic Constraints on Hidden Variables. Foundations of Physics 8 (7-8):629-636.
    In the contemporary discussion of hidden variable interpretations of quantum mechanics, much attention has been paid to the “no hidden variable” proof contained in an important paper of Kochen and Specker. It is a little noticed fact that Bell published a proof of the same result the preceding year, in his well-known 1966 article, where it is modestly described as a corollary to Gleason's theorem. We want to bring out the great simplicity of Bell's formulation of this result and to (...)
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  11. Arthur Fine (1973). Probability and the Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 24 (1):1-37.
  12. James T. Cushing, Arthur Fine & Sheldon Goldstein (1996). Bohmian Mechanics and Quantum Theory: An Appraisal. Springer.
     
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  13.  40
    Arthur Fine (1991). Piecemeal Realism. Philosophical Studies 61 (1-2):79 - 96.
    Faced with realist-resistant sciences and the no-nonsense attitude of the times realism has moved away from the rather grandiose program that had traditionally been characteristic of its school. The objective of the shift seems to be to protect some doctrine still worthy of the "realist" name. The strategy is to relocate the school to where conditions seem optimal for its defense, and then to insinuate that the case for such a " piecemeal realism" could be made elsewhere too, were there (...)
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  14.  94
    Arthur Fine (2003). Quantum Life. Journal of Philosophy 100 (2):80-97.
  15.  41
    Arthur Fine (2009). Science Fictions: Comment on Godfrey-Smith. Philosophical Studies 143 (1):117 - 125.
    This is a comment on Peter Godfrey-Smith’s, “Models and Fictions in Science”. The comments explore problems he raises if we treat model systems as fictions in a naturalized and deflationary framework.
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  16.  45
    Arthur Fine, The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen Argument in Quantum Theory. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    In the May 15, 1935 issue of Physical Review Albert Einstein co-authored a paper with his two postdoctoral research associates at the Institute for Advanced Study, Boris Podolsky and Nathan Rosen. The article was entitled “Can Quantum Mechanical Description of Physical Reality Be Considered Complete?” (Einstein et al. 1935). Generally referred to as “EPR”, this paper quickly became a centerpiece in the debate over the interpretation of the quantum theory, a debate that continues today. The paper features a striking case (...)
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  17.  63
    Arthur Fine (1975). How to Compare Theories: Reference and Change. Noûs 9 (1):17-32.
  18.  34
    Arthur Fine (1982). Some Local Models for Correlation Experiments. Synthese 50 (2):279 - 294.
    This paper constructs two classes of models for the quantum correlation experiments used to test the Bell-type inequalities, synchronization models and prism models. Both classes employ deterministic hidden variables, satisfy the causal requirements of physical locality, and yield precisely the quantum mechanical statistics. In the synchronization models, the joint probabilities, for each emission, do not factor in the manner of stochastic independence, showing that such factorizability is not required for locality. In the prism models the observables are not random variables (...)
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  19.  31
    Maximilian Schlosshauer & Arthur Fine (2005). On Zurek's Derivation of the Born Rule. Foundations of Physics 35 (2):197-213.
  20. Axel Mueller & Arthur Fine, Realism, Beyond Miracles.
    Two things about Hilary Putnam have not changed throughout his career: some (including Putnam himself) have regarded him as a “realist” and some have seen him as a philosopherwho changed his positions (certainly with respect to realism) almost continually. Apparently, what realism meant to him in the 1960s, in the late seventies and eighties, and in the nineties, respectively, are quite different things. Putnam indicates this by changing prefixes: scientific, metaphysical, internal, pragmatic, commonsense, but always realism. Encouraged by Putnam’s own (...)
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  21.  47
    Arthur Fine (1984). And Not Anti-Realism Either. Noûs 18 (1):51-65.
    This paper develops lines of criticism directed at two currently popular versions of anti-realism: the putnam-rorty-kuhn version that is centered on an acceptance theory of truth, and the van fraassen version that is centered on empiricist strictures over warranted beliefs. the paper continues by elaborating and extending a stance, called "the natural ontological attitude", that is neither realist nor anti-realist.
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  22.  9
    Arthur Fine (1980). Correlations and Physical Locality. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1980:535 - 562.
    Two principles of locality used in discussions about quantum mechanics are distinguished. The intuitive no-action-at-a distance requirement is called physical locality. There is also a mathematical requirement of a kind of factorizability which is referred to as "locality". It is argued in this paper that factorizability is not necessary for physical locality. Ways of producing models that are physically local although not factorizable which are concerned with correlations between the behavior of pairs of particles are suggested. These models can account (...)
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  23.  26
    Arthur Fine (1974). On the Completeness of Quantum Theory. Synthese 29 (1-4):257 - 289.
  24. Arthur Fine (2008). Epistemic Instrumentalism, Exceeding Our Grasp. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 137 (1):135 - 139.
    In the concluding chapter of Exceeding our Grasp Kyle Stanford outlines a positive response to the central issue raised brilliantly by his book, the problem of unconceived alternatives. This response, called "epistemic instrumentalism", relies on a distinction between instrumental and literal belief. We examine this distinction and with it the viability of Stanford's instrumentalism, which may well be another case of exceeding our grasp.
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  25.  8
    Mara Beller & Arthur Fine (1994). Bohr's Response to EPR. In Jan Faye & Henry J. Folse (eds.), Niels Bohr and Contemporary Philosophy. Kluwer Academic Publishers 1--31.
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  26.  30
    Arthur Fine (1998). The Viewpoint of No-One in Particular. Proceedings and Adresses of the Apa 72 (2):9-20.
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  27.  66
    Arthur Fine (1999). Fine Sense of Mischief. The Philosophers' Magazine 5 (5):47-48.
  28.  83
    D. Fine & A. Fine (1997). Gauge Theory, Anomalies and Global Geometry: The Interplay of Physics and Mathematics. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B 28 (3):307-323.
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  29.  14
    A. Fine (1990). Einstein and Ensembles: Response. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 20 (8):967-989.
    This article reexamines Einstein's views concerning ensembles and the quantum state function, by way of responding to criticism on this topic. The response calls attention to the range of interpretations found in Einstein's writings, and their function, and emphasizes the nonspecificity of his discussions. It also offers some guidelines for scholarship and criticism in this area.
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  30.  19
    Arthur Fine (2007). Relativism, Pragmatism, and the Practice of Science. In C. J. Misak (ed.), New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press 50--68.
    "But science in the making, science as an end to be pursued, is as subjective and psychologically conditioned as any other branch of human endeavor-- so much so that the question, What is the purpose and meaning of science? receives quite different answers at different times and from different sorts of people" (Einstein 1934, p. 112).
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  31.  11
    Arthur Fine (1999). Locality and the Hardy Theorem. In Jeremy Butterfield & Constantine Pagonis (eds.), From Physics to Philosophy. Cambridge University Press 1.
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  32.  2
    Arthur Fine (1977). Conservation, the Sum Rule and Confirmation. Philosophy of Science 44 (1):95-106.
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  33. Arthur Fine (1987). With Complacency or Concern: Solving the Quantum Measurement Problem. In P. Achinstein & R. Kagon (eds.), Kelvin's Baltimore Lectures and Modern Theoretical Physics. MIT Press 491--505.
     
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  34.  12
    Arthur Fine (1982). Antinomies of Entanglement: The Puzzling Case of the Tangled Statistics. Journal of Philosophy 79 (12):733-747.
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  35.  40
    Arthur Fine (2001). The Scientific Image Twenty Years Later. Philosophical Studies 106 (1-2):107 - 122.
    What we represent to ourselves behind the appear- ances exists only in our understanding . . . [having] only the value of memoria technica or formula whose form, because it is arbitrary and irrelevant, varies . . . with the standpoint of our culture.
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  36.  53
    Arthur I. Fine (1968). Logic, Probability, and Quantum Theory. Philosophy of Science 35 (2):101-111.
    The aim of this paper is to present and discuss a probabilistic framework that is adequate for the formulation of quantum theory and faithful to its applications. Contrary to claims, which are examined and rebutted, that quantum theory employs a nonclassical probability theory based on a nonclassical "logic," the probabilistic framework set out here is entirely classical and the "logic" used is Boolean. The framework consists of a set of states and a set of quantities that are interrelated in a (...)
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  37.  33
    John Earman & Arthur Fine (1977). Against Indeterminacy. Journal of Philosophy 74 (9):535-538.
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  38.  30
    Laszlo E. Szabo & Arthur Fine (2002). A Local Hidden Variable Theory for the GHZ Experiment. Physics Letters A 295:229–240.
    A recent analysis by de Barros and Suppes of experimentally realizable GHZ correlations supports the conclusion that these correlations cannot be explained by introducing local hidden variables. We show, nevertheless, that their analysis does not exclude local hidden variable models in which the inefficiency in the experiment is an effect not only of random errors in the detector equipment, but is also the manifestation of a pre-set, hidden property of the particles ("prism models"). Indeed, we present an explicit prism model (...)
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  39. Arthur Fine (1989). Do Correlations Need to Be Explained? In James T. Cushing & Ernan McMullin (eds.), Philoophical Consequences of Quantum Theory. University of Notre Dame Press 175--194.
     
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  40.  4
    Arthur Fine (2008). Epistemic Instrumentalism, Exceeding Our Grasp. Philosophical Studies 137 (1):135-139.
    In the concluding chapter of Exceeding our Grasp Kyle Stanford outlines a positive response to the central issue raised brilliantly by his book, the problem of unconceived alternatives. This response, called "epistemic instrumentalism", relies on a distinction between instrumental and literal belief. We examine this distinction and with it the viability of Stanford's instrumentalism, which may well be another case of exceeding our grasp.
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  41.  70
    Arthur Fine (1993). Measurement and Quantum Silence. In S. French & H. Kamminga (eds.), Correspondence, Invariance and Heuristics. Kluwer 279--294.
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  42.  51
    Arthur Fine (1964). Physical Geometry and Physical Laws. Philosophy of Science 31 (2):156-162.
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  43.  68
    Arthur Fine, Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.
    (Draft copy published as “Science Made Up: Constructivist Sociology of Scientific Knowledge.” In P. Galison and D. Stump (eds.) The Disunity of Science: Boundaries, Contexts, and Power. Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1996, pp. 231-54.).
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  44.  14
    Arthur Fine (1979). How to Count Frequencies: A Primer for Quantum Realists. Synthese 42 (1):145 - 154.
  45.  25
    A. Fine (1996). Science as Child's Play: Tales From the Crib. Philosophy of Science 63 (4):534-37.
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  46.  1
    Arthur Fine & Micky Forbes (1986). Grünbaum on Freud: Three Grounds for Dissent. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (2):237.
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  47.  20
    Arthur Fine (1978). Conceptual Change in Mathematics and Science: Lakatos' Stretching Refined. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1978:328 - 341.
  48. A. Fine, M. Forbes & L. Wessels (eds.) (1991). Psa 1990. Philosophy of Science Association.
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  49.  9
    Arthur Fine (2007). Relativism, Pragmatism, and the Practice of Science. In Cheryl J. Misak (ed.), New Pragmatists. Oxford University Press 50--67.
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  50.  9
    Arthur Fine (1971). Reflections on a Relational Theory of Space. Synthese 22 (3-4):448 - 481.
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