7 found
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A. H. B. Allen [6]A. H. Burlton Allen [1]
  1.  82
    A. H. B. Allen (1952). Other Minds. Mind 61 (243):328-348.
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  2.  7
    A. H. B. Allen (1955). The Meaning of Beauty. Philosophy 30 (113):112 - 130.
    Theories of beauty are often divided into the objective and the subjective. I am doubtful whether a rigid distinction between the two can be maintained. It is difficult for an objective theory to assert that the impression of beauty is received quite passively, without any reaction or co-operation on the part of the subject, which is likely to be similar in the various cases.
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  3.  4
    A. H. B. Allen (1942). The Nature of Tragedy: A Psychological Essay. Philosophy 17 (66):144 - 158.
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  4.  2
    A. H. Burlton Allen (1930). Pleasure and Instinct: A Study in the Psychology of Human Action. Routledge.
    Description from a book review by J. G. Beebe-Center: "Mr. Allen's book develops in detail the view that pleasure and unpleasure are essentially manifestations of the progression and thwarting of impulses. Part one is a brief summary of the principal theories of feeling. Part two is devoted to "sensory" or "bodily" pleasure and unpleasure. These forms of feeling, it is argued, 'depend on an analogue of conation existing in the organism, a nisus to maintain, or to carry out to the (...)
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  5. A. H. B. Allen (1955). The Meaning Of Beauty. Philosophy 30 (113):112.
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  6. A. H. B. Allen (1942). The Nature of Tragedy: A Psychological Essay: PHILOSOPHY. Philosophy 17 (66):144-158.
    The nature of tragedy has always been felt to be a problem, not only by the philosopher, but also, and perhaps even more, by the ordinary man. The question so often asked is: why, if there is so much suffering already in the world, do we want to go to a theatre or read a story describing more suffering? Why indeed should the spectacle of suffering ever be pleasing to us? Yet it is obvious that olarge numbers of ordinary people (...)
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  7. A. H. B. Allen (1937). The Self in Psychology. Philosophy 12 (47):378-378.