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  1.  25 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1988). Mario Labate: L'arte di farsi amare: Modelli culturali e progetto didascalico nell'elegia ovidiana. (Biblioteca di 'Materiali e discussioni per l'analisi dei testi classici' diretta da Maurizio Bettini e Gian Biagio Conte.) Pp. 232. Pisa: Giardini, 1984. Paper. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (02):413-.
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  2.  15 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1977). Ovid's Metamorphoses G. Karl Galinsky: Ovid's Metamorphoses: An Introduction to the Basic Aspects. Pp. Xi + 285; 1 Plate. Oxford: Blackwell, 1975. Cloth, £6. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 27 (01):24-25.
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  3.  10 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1991). Ovid's Heroides Englished Harold Isbell (Tr.): Ovid, Heroides, Translated with Introduction and Notes. (Penguin Classics.) Pp. Xx + 254. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1990. Paper, £5.99. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 41 (01):60-62.
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  4.  6 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1994). Cornelia M. Hintermeier: Die Briefpaare in Ovids Heroides: Tradition Und Innovation. (Palingenesia, 41.) Pp. Xiii+218; 7 Photographs. Stuttgart: Franz Steiner, 1993. Paper, DM 86. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 44 (02):403-404.
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  5.  3 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1981). The Ceyx Legend in Ovid, Metamorphoses, Book XI. Classical Quarterly 31 (01):147-.
    The saga of Ceyx, king of Trachis, begins at Met. 11.266 and continues to 11.748. Ceyx' adventures form the longest single episode in the Metamorphoses , slightly longer than the Phaethon legend . Three metamorphoses take place in the course of the Ceyx narrative. The first is that of Ceyx' brother Daedalion who is transformed into a hawk. The second transformation occurs in the course of the exiled Peleus' visit to Ceyx when a wolf attacks Peleus' cattle and sheep and (...)
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  6.  2 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1986). Hyginus, Fabula 89 (Laomedon). Classical Quarterly 36 (02):541-.
    Neptunus et Apollo dicuntur Troiam muro cinxisse; his rex Laomedon uouit quod regno suo pecoris eo anno natum esset immolaturum. id uotum auaritia fefellit. alii dicunt †parum eum promisisse. The story that Neptune and Apollo together built the walls of Troy for Laomedon is well known from Homer. At the end of their year's service the perfidious king refused to pay the agreed wages. Ovid tells the familiar story in one of his transitional sections in the Metamorphoses. Hyginus' account poses (...)
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  7.  0 DLs
    A. H. F. Griffin (1988). Amatory Persuasion Nicholas P. Gross: Amatory Persuasion in Antiquity. Studies in Theory and Practice. Pp. 192; 1 Illustration. London and Toronto: Associated University Presses, 1985. £20.95. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 38 (01):56-57.
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