Search results for 'A. H. Hanson' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Adrienne Asch, Erika Blacksher, David A. Buehler, Ellen L. Csikai, Francesco Demartis, Joseph J. Fins, Nina Glick Schiller, Mark J. Hanson, H. Eugene Hern Jr & Kenneth V. Iserson (1998). Monica Arruda is a Candidate for the BSN/MSN in the University of Penn-Sylvania School of Nursing and Senior Research Assistant in the Center for Bioethics at Penn. Her Previous Work has Focused on the Commercialization of Genetic Testing. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7:7-8.score: 1260.0
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  2. T. Van der Sar, Z. H. Wang, M. S. Blok, H. Bernien, T. H. Taminiau, D. M. Toyli, D. A. Lidar, D. D. Awschalom, R. Hanson & V. V. Dobrovitski (2012). Decoherence-Protected Quantum Gates for a Hybrid Solid-State Spin Register. In Jeffrey Kastner (ed.), Nature. Mit Press. 82-86.score: 1260.0
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  3. H. A. Cunningham, M. Pavel & A. J. Hanson (1988). Using Mental Models in a Visual-Motor Adaptation Task. Bulletin of the Psychonomic Society 26 (6):501-501.score: 1260.0
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  4. Virginia H. Dale, Linda A. Joyce, Steve McNulty, Ronald P. Neilson, Matthew P. Ayres, Michael D. Flannigan, Paul J. Hanson, Lloyd C. Irland, Ariel E. Lugo & Chris J. Peterson (2001). Overview Articles-a Special Section on Climate Change and Forest Ecosystems-Climate Change and Forest Disturbances. BioScience 51 (9):723-734.score: 1260.0
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  5. William H. Hanson & James Hawthorne (1985). Validity in Intensional Languages: A New Approach. Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 26 (1):9-35.score: 900.0
    Although the use of possible worlds in semantics has been very fruitful and is now widely accepted, there is a puzzle about the standard definition of validity in possible-worlds semantics that has received little notice and virtually no comment. A sentence of an intensional language is typically said to be valid just in case it is true at every world under every model on every model structure of the language. Each model structure contains a set of possible worlds, and models (...)
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  6. William H. Hanson (2003). Logic, the a Priori, and the Empirical. Theoria 18 (2):171-177.score: 900.0
    The time-honored view that logic is a non-empirical enterprise is still widely accepted, but it is not always recognized that there are (at least) two distinct ways in which this view can be made precise. One way focuses on the knowledge we can have of logical matters, the other on the nature of the logical consequence relation itself. More specifically; the first way embodies the claim that knowledge of whether the logical consequence relation holds in a particular case is knowledge (...)
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  7. A. H. Hanson (1965). Political Philosophy or Political Science? [Leeds, Eng.]Leeds University Press.score: 870.0
  8. Norwood R. Hanson, G. B. Keene, J. L. Ackrill, J. R. Lucas, Thomas McPherson, E. J. Lemmon, W. von Leyden, C. H. Whiteley, Renford Bambrough, A. C. MacIntyre, W. Gerber & M. Kneale (1958). New Books. [REVIEW] Mind 67 (266):272-288.score: 810.0
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  9. William H. Hanson (2002). The Formal-Structural View of Logical Consequence: A Reply to Gila Sher. Philosophical Review 111 (2):243-258.score: 810.0
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  10. William H. Hanson (1971). Review: Lennart Aqvist, A Binary Primitive in Deontic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (3):519-519.score: 810.0
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  11. Virginia H. Dale, Linda A. Joyce, Steve Mcnulty, Ronald P. Neilson, Matthew P. Ayres, Michael D. Flannigan, Paul J. Hanson, Lloyd C. Irland, Ariel E. Lugo, Chris J. Peterson, Daniel Simberloff, Frederick J. Swanson, Brian J. Stocks & B. Michael Wotton (2001). Climate Change and Forest Disturbances. BioScience 51 (9):723.score: 810.0
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  12. Virginia H. Dale, Linda A. Joyce, Steve McNulty, Ronald P. Neilson, Matthew P. Ayres, Michael D. Flannigan, Paul J. Hanson, Lloyd C. Irland, Ariel E. Lugo & Chris J. Peterson (2001). Climate Change and Forest Disturbances Climate Change Can Affect Forests by Altering the Frequency, Intensity, Duration, and Timing of Fire, Drought, Introduced Species, Insect and Pathogen Outbreaks, Hurricanes, Windstorms, Ice Storms, or Landslides. BioScience 51 (9):723-734.score: 810.0
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  13. William H. Hanson (1966). A Logic of Commands. Logique Et Analyse 9:329-343.score: 810.0
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  14. William H. Hanson (1971). Review: Jan Berg, A Note on Deontic Logic. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 36 (1):182-182.score: 810.0
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  15. William H. Hanson (2014). Logical Truth in Modal Languages: Reply to Nelson and Zalta. [REVIEW] Philosophical Studies 167 (2):327-339.score: 720.0
    Does general validity or real world validity better represent the intuitive notion of logical truth for sentential modal languages with an actuality connective? In (Philosophical Studies 130:436–459, 2006) I argued in favor of general validity, and I criticized the arguments of Zalta (Journal of Philosophy 85:57–74, 1988) for real world validity. But in Nelson and Zalta (Philosophical Studies 157:153–162, 2012) Michael Nelson and Edward Zalta criticize my arguments and claim to have established the superiority of real world validity. Section 1 (...)
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  16. William H. Hanson (2006). Actuality, Necessity, and Logical Truth. Philosophical Studies 130 (3):437 - 459.score: 630.0
    The traditional view that all logical truths are metaphysically necessary has come under attack in recent years. The contrary claim is prominent in David Kaplan’s work on demonstratives, and Edward Zalta has argued that logical truths that are not necessary appear in modal languages supplemented only with some device for making reference to the actual world (and thus independently of whether demonstratives like ‘I’, ‘here’, and ‘now’ are present). If this latter claim can be sustained, it strikes close to the (...)
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  17. William H. Hanson (1999). Ray on Tarski on Logical Consequence. Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (6):605-616.score: 450.0
    In "Logical consequence: A defense of Tarski" (Journal of Philosophical Logic, vol. 25, 1996, pp. 617-677), Greg Ray defends Tarski's account of logical consequence against the criticisms of John Etchemendy. While Ray's defense of Tarski is largely successful, his attempt to give a general proof that Tarskian consequence preserves truth fails. Analysis of this failure shows that de facto truth preservation is a very weak criterion of adequacy for a theory of logical consequence and should be replaced by a stronger (...)
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  18. William H. Hanson (1990). Second-Order Logic and Logicism. Mind 99 (393):91-99.score: 450.0
    Some widely accepted arguments in the philosophy of mathematics are fallacious because they rest on results that are provable only by using assumptions that the con- clusions of these arguments seek to undercut. These results take the form of bicon- ditionals linking statements of logic with statements of mathematics. George Boolos has given an argument of this kind in support of the claim that certain facts about second-order logic support logicism, the view that mathematics—or at least part of it—reduces to (...)
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  19. William H. Hanson (1989). Two Kinds of Deviance. History and Philosophy of Logic 10 (1):15-28.score: 450.0
    In this paper I argue that there can be genuine (as opposed to merely verbal) disputes about whether a sentence form is logically true or an argument form is valid. I call such disputes ?cases of deviance?, of which I distinguish a weak and a strong form. Weak deviance holds if one disputant is right and the other wrong, but the available evidence is insufficient to determine which is which. Strong deviance holds if there is no fact of the matter. (...)
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  20. A. Bayart (1970). Review: William H. Hanson, On Some Alleged Decision Procedures for S4. [REVIEW] Journal of Symbolic Logic 35 (2):326-326.score: 219.0
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  21. Peter K. Machamer (1970). Recent Work on Perception. American Philosophical Quarterly 7 (January):1-22.score: 162.0
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  22. Steven Dellaportas (2006). Making a Difference with a Discrete Course on Accounting Ethics. Journal of Business Ethics 65 (4):391 - 404.score: 126.0
    Calls for the expansion of ethics education in the business and accounting curricula have resulted in a variety of interventions including additional material on ethical cases, the code of conduct, and the development of new courses devoted to ethical development [Lampe, J.: 1996]. The issue of whether ethics should be taught has been addressed by many authors [see for example: Hanson, K. O.: 1987; Huss, H. F. and D. M. Patterson: 1993; Jones, T. M.: 1988–1989; Kerr, D. S. and (...)
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  23. Paisley Livingston (2010). Teaching & Learning Guide For: Cinema as Philosophy. Philosophy Compass 5 (4):359-362.score: 81.0
    The idea that films can be philosophical, or in some sense 'do' philosophy, has recently found a number of prominent proponents. What is at stake here is generally more than the tepid claim that some documentaries about philosophy and related topics convey philosophically relevant content. Instead, the contention is that cinematic fictions, including popular movies such as The Matrix , make significant contributions to philosophy. Various more specific claims are linked to this basic idea. One, relatively weak, but pedagogically important (...)
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  24. Belle Cushing (2011). The Poetry of Alessandro De Francesco. Continent 1 (4).score: 81.0
    continent. 1.4 (2011): 286—310. This mad play of writing —Stéphane Mallarmé Somewhere in between mathematics and theory, light and dark, physicality and projection, oscillates the poetry of Alessandro De Francesco. The texts hold no periods or commas, not even a capital letter for reference. Each piece stands as an individual construction, and yet the poetry flows in and out of the frame. Images resurface from one poem to the next, haunting the reader with reincarnations of an object lost in the (...)
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  25. Sidney Morgenbesser (1967). Philosophy of Science Today. New York, Basic Books.score: 81.0
    The nature and aim of science, by E. Nagel.--Truth and provability, by L. Henkin.--Completeness, by L. Henkin.--Computability, by S. C. Kleene.--Necessary truth, by W. V. Quine.--What is a scientific theory? By P. Suppes.--Science and simplicity, by N. Goodman.--Scientific explanation, by C. G. Hempel.--Observation and interpretation, by N. R. Hanson.--Probability and confirmation, by H. Putnam.--Utility and acceptance of hypotheses, by I. Levi.--Space and time, by A. Grünbaum.--Problems of microphysics, by P. Feyerabend.--Aspects of explanation in biological theory, by M. Beckner.--Psychologism and (...)
     
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