Search results for 'A. Hooker' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Michael Hooker (1976). Page 86 a Mistake Concerning Conception/Hooker. In Stephen Francis Barker & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), Thomas Reid: Critical Interpretations. University City Science Center. 3--86.score: 390.0
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  2. Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science II: Learning How to Learn Across a Revolution in Early Ape Language Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (2):222-255.score: 330.0
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper I (Farrell and Hooker, a) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning. The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape language research. Paper I examined the basic features of SDAL in relation to the early history of ape-language research. In this second paper we examine the reconceptualization of (...)
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  3. Wayne David Christensen & Cliff A. Hooker (2001). Self-Directed Agents. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 31 (Supplement):19-52.score: 270.0
    Wayne D. Christensen and Cliff A. Hooker.
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  4. Brad Hooker (2000). Ideal Code, Real World: A Rule-Consequentialist Theory of Morality. Oxford University Press.score: 240.0
    What are the appropriate criteria for assessing a theory of morality? In this enlightening work, Brad Hooker begins by answering this question. He then argues for a rule-consequentialist theory which, in part, asserts that acts should be assessed morally in terms of impartially justified rules. In the end, he considers the implications of rule-consequentialism for several current controversies in practical ethics, making this clearly written, engaging book the best overall statement of this approach to ethics.
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  5. Cliff A. Hooker (1997). Dynamical Systems in Development: Review Essay of Linda V. Smith & Esther Thelen (Eds) a Dynamics Systems Approach to Development: Applications. Philosophical Psychology 10 (1):103 – 112.score: 240.0
    This book focuses on showing how the ideas central to the new wave oj dynamic systems studies may also form the basis for a new and distinctive theory of human development where both global order and local variability in behaviour emerge together from the same organising dynamical interactions. This also sharpens our understanding of the weaknesses of the traditional formal, structuralist theories. Conversely, dynamical models have their own matching set of problems, many of which are consiously explored here. Less readily (...)
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  6. Robert P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2007). Applying Self-Directed Anticipative Learning to Science I: Agency, Error, and the Interactive Exploration of Possibility Space in Early Ape-Langugae Research. Perspectives on Science 15 (1):87-124.score: 240.0
    : The purpose of this paper and its sister paper (Farrell and Hooker, b) is to present, evaluate and elaborate a proposed new model for the process of scientific development: self-directed anticipative learning (SDAL). The vehicle for its evaluation is a new analysis of a well-known historical episode: the development of ape-language research. In this first paper we outline five prominent features of SDAL that will need to be realized in applying SDAL to science: 1) interactive exploration of possibility (...)
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  7. C. A. Hooker (1981). Towards a General Theory of Reduction. Part III: Cross-Categorical Reduction. Dialogue 20 (03):496-529.score: 210.0
  8. C. A. Hooker (1981). Towards a General Theory of Reduction. Part II: Identity in Reduction. Dialogue 20 (02):201-236.score: 210.0
  9. C. A. Hooker (1981). Towards a General Theory of Reduction. Part I: Historical and Scientific Setting. Dialogue 20 (01):38-59.score: 210.0
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  10. Cliff A. Hooker & Wayne D. Christensen (1998). Towards a New Science of the Mind: Wide Content and the Metaphysics of Organizational Properties in Nonlinear Dynamic Models. Mind and Language 13 (1):98-109.score: 210.0
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  11. C. A. Hooker (1979). Hollis and Nell's Rational Economic Man: A Philosophical Critique of Neo-Classical Economics:Rational Economic Man: A Philosophical Critique of Neo-Classical Economics M. Hollis, E. Nell. Philosophy of Science 46 (3):470-.score: 210.0
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  12. C. A. Hooker, H. B. Penfold & R. J. Evans (1992). Control, Connectionism and Cognition: Towards a New Regulatory Paradigm. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 43 (4):517-536.score: 210.0
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  13. C. A. Hooker (1987). Book Review:Popper and the Human Sciences G. Currie, A. Musgrave. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 54 (2):313-.score: 210.0
  14. J. T. Hooker, W. M. Calder & D. A. Traill (1988). Myth, Scandal, and History: The Heinrich Schliemann Controversy and a First Edition of the Mycenaean Diary. Journal of Hellenic Studies 108:258.score: 210.0
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  15. C. A. Hooker (1979). Review: Hollis and Nell's Rational Economic Man: A Philosophical Critique of Neo-Classical Economics. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 46 (3):470 - 490.score: 210.0
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  16. C. A. Hooker (1995). Reason, Regulation, and Realism: Towards a Regulatory Systems Theory of Reason and Evolutionary Epistemology. State University of New York Press.score: 210.0
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  17. C. A. Hooker, H. B. Penfold & R. J. Evans (1992). Towards a Theory of Cognition Under a New Control Paradigm. Topoi 11 (1):71-88.score: 210.0
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  18. Cuff A. Hooker (1995). Adaptation in Systems: A Review Essay. Philosophical Psychology 8 (3):287 – 299.score: 210.0
    Adaptation in Natural and Artificial Systems . J. H. Holland Cambridge, MA, Bradford/MIT Press, 1992.
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  19. C. A. Hooker (1986). STICH, STEPHEN P. [1983]: From Folk Psychology to Cognitive Science. MIT Press (a Bradford Book). Xii + 266 Pp. ISBN 0-262-19215-2. [REVIEW] British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 37 (2):238-242.score: 210.0
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  20. W. D. Christensen, J. D. Collier & C. A. Hooker (forthcoming). Adaptiveness and Adaptation: A New Autonomy-Theoretic Analysis and Critique. Biology and Philosophy.score: 210.0
     
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  21. W. D. Christensen & C. A. Hooker (forthcoming). A General Interactivist-Constructivist Model of Intentionality. Contemporary Naturalist Theories of Evolution and Intentionality, Canadian Journal of Philosophy, Special Supplementary Volume.score: 210.0
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  22. W. E. Herfel & C. A. Hooker (1999). From Formal Machine to Social Colony: Toward a Complex Dynamical Philosophy of Science. In. In Maria Luisa Dalla Chiara (ed.), Language, Quantum, Music. 7--18.score: 210.0
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  23. C. A. Hooker (1987). A Naturalist Realism in Nouvelles Tendances du Réalisme: La Perspective Australienne. Revue Internationale de Philosophie 41 (160):5-28.score: 210.0
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  24. C. A. Hooker (1987). A Realistic Theory of Science. State University of New York Press.score: 210.0
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  25. C. A. Hooker (1973). Physics and Metaphysics: A Prolegomenon for the Riddles of Quantum Theory'. In , Contemporary Research in the Foundations and Philosophy of Quantum Theory. Boston,D. Reidel. 174--304.score: 210.0
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  26. C. A. Hooker (1992). Piaget's Psychology, Biology and Evolutionary Epistemology: A Regulatory Systems Approach. Biology and Philosophy 9:197-244.score: 210.0
     
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  27. Brad Hooker & Guy Fletcher (2008). Variable Versus Fixed-Rate Rule-Utilitarianism. Philosophical Quarterly 58 (231):344–352.score: 150.0
    Fixed-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism evaluate rules in terms of the expected net value of one particular level of social acceptance, but one far enough below 100% social acceptance to make salient the complexities created by partial compliance. Variable-rate versions of rule-consequentialism and rule-utilitarianism instead evaluate rules in terms of their expected net value at all different levels of social acceptance. Brad Hooker has advocated a fixed-rate version. Michael Ridge has argued that the variable-rate version is better. The (...)
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  28. Wayne D. Christensen & Clifford A. Hooker (1999). The Organization of Knowledge: Beyond Campbell's Evolutionary Epistemology. Philosophy of Science 66 (3):249.score: 150.0
    Donald Campbell has long advocated a naturalist epistemology based on a general selection theory, with the scope of knowledge restricted to vicarious adaptive processes. But being a vicariant is problematic because it involves an unexplained epistemic relation. We argue that this relation is to be explicated organizationally in terms of the regulation of behavior and internal state by the vicariant, but that Campbell's selectionist approach can give no satisfactory account of it because it is opaque to organization. We show how (...)
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  29. Brad Hooker (2007). Rule-Consequentialism and Internal Consistency: A Reply to Card. Utilitas 19 (4):514-519.score: 150.0
    Rule-consequentialism has been accused of either collapsing into act-consequentialism or being internally inconsistent. I have tried to develop a form of rule-consequentialism without these flaws. In this June's issue of Utilitas, Robert Card argued that I have failed. Here I assess his arguments.
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  30. Brad Hooker (1991). Rule-Consequentialism and Demandingness: A Reply to Carson. Mind 100 (2):269-276.score: 150.0
    This paper replies to Carson's attacks on an earlier paper of Hooker's. Carson argued that rule-consequentialism--the theory that an act is morally right if and only if it is allowed by the set of rules and corresponding virtues the having of which by everyone would bring about the best consequences considered impartially--can and does require the comfortably off to make enormous sacrifices in order to help the needy. Hooker defends rule-consequentialism against Carson's arguments.
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  31. C. A. Hooker (2004). Asymptotics, Reduction and Emergence. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 55 (3):435-479.score: 150.0
    All the major inter-theoretic relations of fundamental science are asymptotic ones, e.g. quantum theory as Planck's constant h 0, yielding (roughly) Newtonian mechanics. Thus asymptotics ultimately grounds claims about inter-theoretic explanation, reduction and emergence. This paper examines four recent, central claims by Batterman concerning asymptotics and reduction. While these claims are criticised, the discussion is used to develop an enriched, dynamically-based account of reduction and emergence, to show its capacity to illuminate the complex variety of inter-theory relationships in physics, and (...)
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  32. C. A. Hooker (1994). Regulatory Constructivism: On the Relation Between Evolutionary Epistemology and Piaget's Genetic Epistemology. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 9 (2):197-244.score: 150.0
    It is argued that fundamental to Piaget''s life works is a biologically based naturalism in which the living world is a nested complex of self-regulating, self-organising (constructing) adaptive systems. A structuralist-rationalist overlay on this core position is distinguished and it is shown how it may be excised without significant loss of content or insight. A new and richer conception of the nature of Piaget''s genetic epistemology emerges, one which enjoys rich interrelationships with evolutionary epistemology. These are explored and it is (...)
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  33. C. A. Hooker (1971). Sharp and the Refutation of the Einstein, Podolsky, Rosen Paradox. Philosophy of Science 38 (2):224-233.score: 150.0
    D. H. Sharp has recently argued that Einstein, Podolsky, and Rosen failed to make good their claim that elementary quantum theory provides only an incomplete description of physical reality. Sharp expounds in detail three criticisms (a fourth is mentioned) which focus largely on formal features of the quantum theory. I argue, on grounds centered largely in our search for an adequate physical understanding of the micro domain, that each of these criticisms must be rejected. The original criticism of quantum theory (...)
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  34. R. P. Farrell & C. A. Hooker (2009). Error, Error-Statistics and Self-Directed Anticipative Learning. Foundations of Science 14 (4):249-271.score: 150.0
    Error is protean, ubiquitous and crucial in scientific process. In this paper it is argued that understanding scientific process requires what is currently absent: an adaptable, context-sensitive functional role for error in science that naturally harnesses error identification and avoidance to positive, success-driven, science. This paper develops a new account of scientific process of this sort, error and success driving Self-Directed Anticipative Learning (SDAL) cycling, using a recent re-analysis of ape-language research as test example. The example shows the limitations of (...)
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  35. C. A. Hooker (1994). Idealisation, Naturalism, and Rationality: Some Lessons From Minimal Rationality. Synthese 99 (2):181 - 231.score: 150.0
    In his bookMinimal Rationality (1986), Christopher Cherniak draws deep and widespread conclusions from our finitude, and not only for philosophy but also for a wide range of science as well. Cherniak's basic idea is that traditional philosophical theories of rationality represent idealisations that are inaccessible to finite rational agents. It is the purpose of this paper to apply a theory of idealisation in science to Cherniak's arguments. The heart of the theory is a distinction between idealisations that represent reversible, solely (...)
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  36. J. C. Skewes & C. A. Hooker (2009). Bio-Agency and the Problem of Action. Biology and Philosophy 24 (3):283 - 300.score: 150.0
    The Aristotle-Kant tradition requires that autonomous activity must originate within the self and points toward a new type of causation (different from natural efficient causation) associated with teleology. Notoriously, it has so far proven impossible to uncover a workable model of causation satisfying these requirements without an increasingly unsatisfying appeal to extra-physical elements tailor-made for the purpose. In this paper we first provide the essential reason why the standard linear model of efficient causation cannot support the required model of agency: (...)
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  37. C. A. Hooker (1975). Philosophy and Meta-Philosophy of Science: Empiricism, Popperianism and Realism. Synthese 32 (1-2):177 - 231.score: 150.0
    An explicit philosophy and meta-philosophy of positivism, empiricism and popperianism is provided. Early popperianism is argued to be essentially a form of empiricism, the deviations from empiricism are traced. In contrast, the meta-philosophy and philosophy of an evolutionary naturalistic realism is developed and it is shown how the maximal conflict of this doctrine with all forms of empiricism at the meta-philosophical level both accounts for the form of its development at the philosophical level and its defense against attack from nonrealist (...)
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  38. W. D. Christensen & C. A. Hooker (2000). An Interactivist-Constructivist Approach to Intelligence: Self-Directed Anticipative Learning. Philosophical Psychology 13 (1):5 – 45.score: 150.0
    This paper outlines an original interactivist-constructivist (I-C) approach to modelling intelligence and learning as a dynamical embodied form of adaptiveness and explores some applications of I-C to understanding the way cognitive learning is realized in the brain. Two key ideas for conceptualizing intelligence within this framework are developed. These are: (1) intelligence is centrally concerned with the capacity for coherent, context-sensitive, self-directed management of interaction; and (2) the primary model for cognitive learning is anticipative skill construction. Self-directedness is a capacity (...)
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  39. C. A. Hooker (2009). Interaction and Bio-Cognitive Order. Synthese 166 (3):513 - 546.score: 150.0
    The role of interaction in learning is essential and profound: it must provide the means to solve open problems (those only vaguely specified in advance), but cannot be captured using our familiar formal cognitive tools. This presents an impasse to those confined to present formalisms; but interaction is fundamentally dynamical, not formal, and with its importance thus underlined it invites the development of a distinctively interactivist account of life and mind. This account is provided, from its roots in the interactivist (...)
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  40. Brad Hooker (1994). Is Rule-Consequentialism a Rubber Duck? Analysis 54 (2):92 - 97.score: 150.0
    Some things aren't what their names suggest. This is true of rubber ducks, stool pigeons, clay pigeons, hot dogs, and clothes horses. Frances Howard-Snyder's "Rule Consequentialism is a Rubber Duck" ("APQ", 30 (1993) 271-78) argues that the answer is Yes. Howard-Snyder thinks rule-consequentialism is a form of deontology, not a form of consequentialism. This thought is understandable: many recent definitions of consequentialism are such as to invite it. Thinking rule-consequentialism inferior to act-consequentialism, many philosophers, when discussing consequentialism, have had act-consequentialism (...)
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  41. C. A. Hooker (1975). On Global Theories. Philosophy of Science 42 (2):152-179.score: 150.0
    Contrary to the Empiricist model of science, successful sufficiently fundamental theories not only fit and unify their data fields but also prescribe the general terms in which relevantly to describe observation; specify what is and is not observable; specify the conditions under which what is observable, is observable; specify the instrumental means and reliability by which what is measurable is measured; specify what is causally, statistically, and merely accidentally connected. Moreover, such theories typically require all or most of the entire (...)
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  42. C. A. Hooker (1998). Being There: Putting Philosopher, Researcher and Student Together Again. [REVIEW] Metascience 7 (1):70-95.score: 150.0
    A SLOW revolution in cognitive science is banishing this century's technological conception of mind as disembodied pure thought, namely a material symbol manipulation, and replacing it with next century's conception: mind as the organisation of bodily interaction, intelligent robotics. Here is Clark: Intelligence and understanding are rooted not in the presence and manipulation of explicit, language-like data structures, but in something more earthy: the tuning of basic responses to a real world that enables an embodied organism to sense, act and (...)
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  43. C. A. Hooker (1991). Projection, Physical Intelligibility, Objectivity and Completeness: The Divergent Ideals of Bohr and Einstein. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 42 (4):491-511.score: 150.0
    It is shown how the development of physics has involved making explicit what were homocentric projections which had heretofore been implicit, indeed inexpressible in theory. This is shown to support a particular notion of the invariant as the real. On this basis the divergence in ideals of physical intelligibility between Bohr and Einstein is set out. This in turn leads to divergent, but explicit, conceptions of objectivity and completeness for physical theory. *I am indebted to Dr. G. McLelland. Professor F. (...)
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  44. Brad Hooker (1996). Does Moral Virtue Constitute a Benefit to the Agent? In Roger Crisp (ed.), How Should one Live? Oxford University Press.score: 150.0
    Theories of individual well‐being fall into three main categories: hedonism, the desire‐fulfilment theory, and the list theory (which maintains that there are some things that can benefit a person without increasing the person's pleasure or desire‐fulfilment). The paper briefly explains the answers that hedonism and the desire‐fulfilment theory give to the question of whether being virtuous constitutes a benefit to the agent. Most of the paper is about the list theory's answer.
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  45. C. A. Hooker (1975). Remarks on the Principle of the Identity of Indiscernibles. Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 6 (3):129-153.score: 150.0
    The relationship of the identity of indiscernibles principle to other major metaphysical principles (e.g., relational doctrine of space and time, elimination of singular terms) is discussed, the aim being to outline the necessary requirements of a systematic metaphysics incorporating the former principle. the conclusion is that no adequate systematic metaphysics of this sort is defensible. throughout special attention is paid to modern logical formulation of the principle and to its role in quine's philosophy.
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  46. Juliet Hooker (2009). Race and the Politics of Solidarity. OUP USA.score: 150.0
    Solidarity-the reciprocal relations of trust and obligation between citizens that are essential for a thriving polity-is a basic goal of all political communities. Yet it is extremely difficult to achieve, especially in multiracial societies. In an era of increasing global migration and democratization, that issue is more pressing than perhaps ever before. In the past few decades, racial diversity and the problems of justice that often accompany it have risen dramatically throughout the world. It features prominently nearly everywhere: from the (...)
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  47. Anthony A. Derksen & C. A. Hooker (1996). The Scientific Realism of Rom Harre. British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 47 (4):647-653.score: 150.0
     
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  48. R. Heath, B. Hayes, A. Heathcote & C. Hooker (eds.) (1999). Dynamical Cognitive Science: Proceedings of the Fourth Australasian Cognitive Science Conference. University of Newcastle.score: 150.0
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  49. C. A. Hooker (1988). From Logical Formalism to Control Structure: The Evolution of Methodological Understanding. PSA: Proceedings of the Biennial Meeting of the Philosophy of Science Association 1988:211 - 221.score: 150.0
    The thesis of this paper is that scientific method is to be thought of as a complex many-leveled regulatory hierarchy of principles, interacting with theory also viewed as a complex many-leveled hierarchy. This conception of method is illustrated in particular through one episode in the contemporary development of plasma physics, and related to others. It provides for method-theory interaction and for the development of method itself as science develops.
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  50. Brad Hooker (2005). The Golden Rule. Think 4 (10):25-29.score: 150.0
    Should you always do unto others as you would have them do unto you? Brad Hooker investigates a seemingly plausible-looking moral principle: the Golden Rule.
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