Search results for 'A. John Maule' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. D. L. A. (1926). Statement and Inference with Other Philosophical Papers. By John Cook Wilson, Sometime Wykeham Professor of Logic in the University of Oxford. Edited From the MSS. By A. S. L. Farquharson, Fellow of University College. With a Portrait, Memoir, and Selected Correspondence. (London: The Clarendon Press. 1925. 2 Vols. Pp. Clxiv + 901. Price 31s. 6d.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 1 (04):511-.score: 1260.0
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  2. Joseph D. John (2007). Experience as Medium: John Dewey and a Traditional Japanese Aesthetic. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 21 (2):83 - 90.score: 1260.0
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  3. G. P. A. (1887). Gai Iuli Caesaris de Bello Gallico Cominentarii, After the German of Kraner-Dittenberger. By Rev. John Bond, M.A., and A. S. Walpole, M.A. London. Macmillan. 6s. [REVIEW] The Classical Review 1 (08):233-.score: 1260.0
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  4. Tobin Nellhaus (2010). Paul Cobley (Ed.), Realism for the Twenty-First Century: A John Deely Reader. Scranton, Penn. Scranton University Press, 2009. [REVIEW] Journal of Critical Realism 10 (1):136-138.score: 176.0
    Reviews a collection of John Deely's articles. Deely is interested in the relationship between semiotics on the one hand, and the realism of Thomas Aquinas and John Poinsot on the other.
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  5. Thomas Douglas (2013). Moral Enhancement Via Direct Emotion Modulation: A Reply to John Harris. Bioethics 27 (3):160-168.score: 156.0
    Some argue that humans should enhance their moral capacities by adopting institutions that facilitate morally good motives and behaviour. I have defended a parallel claim: that we could permissibly use biomedical technologies to enhance our moral capacities, for example by attenuating certain counter-moral emotions. John Harris has recently responded to my argument by raising three concerns about the direct modulation of emotions as a means to moral enhancement. He argues (1) that such means will be relatively ineffective in bringing (...)
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  6. Matthew J. Brown, A Centennial Retrospective of John Dewey's "The Influence of Darwinism on Philosophy&Quot;.score: 156.0
    n 1909, the 50th anniversary of both the publication of Origin of the Species and his own birth, John Dewey published "The Influence of Darwin on Philosophy." This optimistic essay saw Darwin's advance not only as one of empirical or theoretical biology, but a logical and conceptual revolution that would shake every corner of philosophy. Dewey tells us less about the influence that Darwin exerted over philosophy over the past 50 years and instead prophesied the influence it would (or (...)
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  7. Huib L. de Jong & Maurice K. D. Schouten (2005). Ruthless Reductionism: A Review Essay of John Bickle's Philosophy and Neuroscience: A Ruthlessly Reductive Account. [REVIEW] Philosophical Psychology 18 (4):473-486.score: 156.0
    John Bickle's new book on philosophy and neuroscience is aptly subtitled 'a ruthlessly reductive account'. His 'new wave metascience' is a massive attack on the relative autonomy that psychology enjoyed until recently, and goes even beyond his previous (Bickle, J. (1998). Psychoneural reduction: The new wave. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.) new wave reductionsism. Reduction of functional psychology to (cognitive) neuroscience is no longer ruthless enough; we should now look rather to cellular or molecular neuroscience at the lowest possible level (...)
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  8. Peter Gan Chong Beng (2009). Union and Difference: A Dialectical Structuring of St. John of the Cross' Mysticism. Sophia 48 (1):43-57.score: 156.0
    This paper intends to append the frame of dialectic upon St. John of the Cross’ delineation of mysticism. Its underlying hypothesis is that the dialectical structuring of St. John’s mystical theology promises to unravel the web of relational concepts embedded within his immense writings on this unique phenomenon. It is hoped that as a consequence of this undertaking, relevant pairs of correlative opposites that figure prominently in mysticism can be elucidated and perhaps come to some form of resolution.
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  9. David Ellerman (forthcoming). Listen Libertarians!: A Review of John Tomasi's Free Market Fairness. [REVIEW] Conversations in Philanthropy.score: 156.0
    John Tomasi's new book, Free Market Fairness, has been well-received as "one of the very best philosophical treatments of libertarian thought, ever" (Tyler Cowen) and as a "long and friendly conversation between Friedrich Hayek and John Rawls—a conversation which, astonishingly, reaches agreement" (D. McCloskey). The book does present an authoritative state-of-the-debate across the spectrum from right-libertarianism on the one side to high liberalism (that shares some shades of opinion with democratic socialism) on the other side. My point is (...)
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  10. Brendan Peter Triffett (2012). Processio and The Place of Ontic Being: John Milbank and James K.A. Smith On Participation. Heythrop Journal 54 (5):n/a-n/a.score: 156.0
    James K.A. Smith argues that the ontology of participation associated with Radical Orthodoxy is incompatible with a Christian affirmation of the intrinsic being and goodness of creatures. In response, he proposes a Leibnizian view in which things are endowed with the innate dynamism of ‘force’. Creatures have a certain depth of being, and are intrinsically good, just because they each have an inner virtuality that they bring into expression. Such force is said to be a metaphysical component of the agent. (...)
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  11. Hannah Tierney (forthcoming). A Pilgrimage Through John Martin Fischer's Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-18.score: 156.0
    John Martin Fischer’s most recent collection of essays, Deep Control: Essays on Free Will and Value, is both incredibly wide-ranging and impressively detailed. Fischer manages to cover a staggering amount of ground in the free will debate, while also providing insightful and articulate analyses of many of the positions defended in the field. In this collection, Fischer focuses on the relationship between free will and moral responsibility. In the first section of his book, Fischer defends Frankfurt cases as an (...)
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  12. Luis Tomás Montilla Fernández & Johannes Schwarze (2013). John Rawls's Theory of Justice and Large-Scale Land Acquisitions: A Law and Economics Analysis of Institutional Background Justice in Sub-Saharan Africa. [REVIEW] Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 26 (6):1223-1240.score: 156.0
    During the 2007–2008 global food crisis, the prices of primary foods, in particular, peaked. Subsequently, governments concerned about food security and investors keen to capitalize on profit-maximizing opportunities undertook large-scale land acquisitions (LASLA) in, predominantly, least developed countries (LDCs). Economically speaking, this market reaction is highly welcome, as it should (1) improve food security and lower prices through more efficient food production while (2) host countries benefit from development opportunities. However, our assessment of the debate on the issues indicates critical (...)
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  13. Robert Greenleaf Brice (2008). A Reply to John Searle and Other Traditionalists. Multicultural Education 16 (2):37-40.score: 156.0
    One of the more recent pedagogical debates confronting university instructors is whether liberal education should be replaced with multiculturalism. John Searle has labeled these positions as “traditionalists” and “challengers,” respectively. While not finding “much that is objectionable in the [traditionalists’] assumptions,” Searle argues that the challengers’ assumptions are “weak” and “fallacious.” This negative outcome for the challengers however, is due in large part to Searle’s misrepresentation of their position. Searle presents a flawed, straw-man argument; he unfairly and inaccurately presents (...)
     
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  14. Nico Vorster (2012). The Secular and the Sacred in the Thinking of John Milbank: A Critical Evaluation. Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (32):109-131.score: 156.0
    This article examines John Milbank's deconstruction of secular social theory, and the counter master narrative that he proposes. Milbank depicts secular social theory as based on an ontology of 'violence'. Instead, he proposes a participatory Christian master narrative based on an ontology of peace. Two questions are posed in this article. First, is Milbank's description of secular thought as undergirded by an ontology of violence valid? Second, does the Christian counter narrative that he proposes provide an adequate and viable (...)
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  15. John Horton & Glen Newey (2006). John Gray: A Political Theorist Of and Against Our Times. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 9 (2):113--115.score: 150.0
    (2006). John Gray: A Political Theorist Of and Against Our Times. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy: Vol. 9, The Political Theory of John Gray, pp. 113-115.
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  16. A. Lubowski-Jahn (2011). A Comparative Analysis of the Landscape Aesthetics of Alexander von Humboldt and John Ruskin. British Journal of Aesthetics 51 (3):321-333.score: 150.0
    This article compares Alexander von Humboldt's and John Ruskin's writings on landscape art and natural landscape. In particular, Humboldt's conception of a habitat's essence as predominantly composed of vegetation as well as judgment of tropical American nature as the realm of nature of the highest aesthetic enjoyment is examined in the context of Ruskin's aesthetic theory. The magnitude of Humboldt's contribution to the natural sciences seems to have clouded our appreciation of his prominent status in the field of art (...)
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  17. Larry A. Hickman (1997). Inquiry: A Core Concept of John Dewey's Philosophy. Free Inquiry 17.score: 150.0
    This article contains a brief discussion of some of the key concepts of John Dewey's theory of inquiry. Dewey presented his theory of inquiry differently to different audiences, such as fellow philosophers, teachers, and the public. Nevertheless, his many accounts exhibit a common pattern: inquiry arises out of unsettled situations, proceeds by the formulation and testing of hypotheses, and contains an affective dimension. Proposed solutions must be tested in the domain of existential affairs. Even when they are accepted, their (...)
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  18. John J. Conley & Joseph W. Koterski (eds.) (1999). Prophecy and Diplomacy: The Moral Doctrine of John Paul Ii: A Jesuit Symposium. Fordham University Press.score: 150.0
    Stemming from two conferences, held in 1994, and 1996, Prophecy and Diplomacy: The Moral Doctrine of John Paul II explores the general orientations and the specific applications of the moral teaching of Pope John Paul II. The first part of the book places the Pope's moral theory within a broader theological framework, attempting to identify the overarching philosophical and theological attitudes that shape the Pope's fundamental moral perspective. In part two, the work studies the Pope's teaching in the (...)
     
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  19. John M. Robson (ed.) (2011). Collected Works of John Stuart Mill: Vii. System of Logic: Ratiocinative and Inductive Vol A. Routledge.score: 150.0
    The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill took thirty years to complete and is acknowledged as the definitive edition of J.S. Mill and as one of the finest works editions ever completed. Mill's contributions to philosophy, economics, and history, and in the roles of scholar, politician and journalist can hardly be overstated and this edition remains the only reliable version of the full range of Mill's writings. Each volume contains extensive notes, a new introduction and an index. Many of (...)
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  20. John M. Robson (ed.) (2010). Collected Works of John Stuart Mill: Iv. Essays on Economics and Society Vol A. Routledge.score: 150.0
    The Collected Works of John Stuart Mill took thirty years to complete and is acknowledged as the definitive edition of J.S. Mill and as one of the finest works editions ever completed. Mill's contributions to philosophy, economics, and history, and in the roles of scholar, politician and journalist can hardly be overstated and this edition remains the only reliable version of the full range of Mill's writings. Each volume contains extensive notes, a new introduction and an index. Many of (...)
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  21. William A. Edmundson (2003). Locke and Load: A Review of A. John Simmons, Justification and Legitimacy: Essays on Rights and Obligations. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 22 (2):195-216.score: 146.0
  22. A. W. (2003). A Review of A. John Simmons, Justification and Legitimacy: Essays on Rights and Obligations. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 22 (2):195-216.score: 146.0
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  23. William A. Edmundson (2003). A Review of A. John Simmons. [REVIEW] Law and Philosophy 22 (2):195-216.score: 146.0
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  24. E. Bach, E. Jelinek, A. Kratzer & B. H. Partee (1995). First, the Claim That Mohawk Does Not Have Quantificational NPs Requires Some Defense. In Fact, Mohawk Does Have Sentences That Are Near-Equiv-Alents of Sentences with Quantificational NPs in English.(1) Gives Examples in Which the Word Akweku Appears with Universal Force:(1) A. John Akweku Wa-Shako-Kv-'. [REVIEW] In Emmon Bach, Eloise Jelinek, Angelika Kratzer & Barbara Partee (eds.), Quantification in Natural Languages. Kluwer. 21.score: 146.0
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  25. Nythamar Fernandes de Oliveira, Draiton Gonzaga de Souza & John Rawls (eds.) (2009). Justiça Global E Democracia: Homenagem a John Rawls. Edipucrs.score: 146.0
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  26. John Hick (1990). A John Hick Reader. Trinity Press International.score: 146.0
     
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  27. Peter A. Schouls (1993). A. John Simmons, The Lockean Theory of Rights Reviewed By. Philosophy in Review 13 (3):118-120.score: 146.0
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  28. Elliott Sober (2008). Intelligent Design, Irreducible Complexity, and Minds—a Reply to John Beaudoin. Faith and Philosophy 25 (4):443-446.score: 144.0
    In my paper “Intelligent Design Theory and the Supernatural—the ‘God or Extra-Terrestrial’ Reply,” I argued that Intelligent Design (ID) Theory, when coupled with independently plausible further assumptions, leads to the conclusion that a supernatural intelligent designer exists. ID theory is therefore not neutral on the question of whether there are supernatural agents. In this respect, it differs from the Darwinian theory of evolution. John Beaudoin replies to my paper in his “Sober on Intelligent Design Theory and the Intelligent Designer,” (...)
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  29. James Tully (1980). A Discourse on Property: John Locke and His Adversaries. Cambridge University Press.score: 144.0
    John Locke's theory of property is perhaps the most distinctive and the most influential aspect of his political theory. In this book James Tully uses an hermeneutical and analytical approach to offer a revolutionary revision of early modern theories of property, focusing particularly on that of Locke. Setting his analysis within the intellectual context of the seventeenth century, Professor Tully overturns the standard interpretations of Locke's theory, showing that it is not a justification of private property. Instead he shows (...)
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  30. Gregory J. Morgan (2010). Laws of Biological Design: A Reply to John Beatty. Biology and Philosophy 25 (3):379-389.score: 144.0
    In this paper, I argue against John Beatty’s position in his paper “The Evolutionary Contingency Thesis” by counterexample. Beatty argues that there are no distinctly biological laws because the outcomes of the evolutionary processes are contingent. I argue that the heart of the Caspar–Klug theory of virus structure—that spherical virus capsids consist of 60T subunits (where T = k 2 + hk + h 2 and h and k are integers)—is a distinctly biological law even if the existence of (...)
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  31. Ross Cameron, A Critical Study of John Heil's 'From an Ontological Point of View'.score: 144.0
    Metaphysicians eager to engage with substantive, thoughtful, and provocative issues will be happy with John Heil’s From an Ontological Point of View. The book represents not only a sustained defence of a specific metaphysical theory, but also of a specific way of doing metaphysics. Put ontology first, Heil urges us, in order to remember that the original fascination of metaphysics wasn’t the question ‘what must the world be like in order to correspond neatly to our use of language?’, but (...)
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  32. Nick Trakakis (2007). An Epistemically Distant God? A Critique of John Hick's Response to the Problem of Divine Hiddenness. Heythrop Journal 48 (2):214–226.score: 144.0
    God is thought of as hidden in at least two ways. Firstly, God's reasons for permitting evil, particularly instances of horrendous evil, are often thought to be inscrutable or beyond our ken. Secondly, and perhaps more problematically, God's very existence and love or concern for us is often thought to be hidden from us (or, at least, from many of us on many occasions). But if we assume, as seems most plausible, that God's reasons for permitting evil will (in many, (...)
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  33. Durwood Foster (1982). Pannenbergs Polanyianism: A Response to John V. Apczynski. Zygon 17 (1):75-81.score: 144.0
    . John V. Apczynski, while presenting a helpful analysis of Wolfhart Pannenberg and Michael Polanyi, does not succeed in showing that Pannenberg’s theology is incoherent. Contrary to Apczynski, I hold that Pannenberg’s concern for theoretic assertions is not extrinsic but intrinsic and central to his program. Moreover, this concern does not rest directly upon the cultural dominance of impersonal knowing but is a countering of the theological overreaction against it. Polanyi has pioneered the critique of impersonal knowledge, but in (...)
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  34. John Perry (2008). Can't We All Just Be Compatibilists?: A Critical Study of John Martin Fischer's My Way. [REVIEW] Journal of Ethics 12 (2):157 - 166.score: 144.0
    My aim in this study is not to praise Fischer's fine theory of moral responsibility, but to (try to) bury the "semi" in "semicompatibilism". I think Fischer gives the Consequence Argument (CA) too much credit, and gives himself too little credit. In his book, The Metaphysics of Free Will, Fischer gave the CA as good a statement as it will ever get, and put his finger on what is wrong with it. Then he declared stalemate rather than victory. In my (...)
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  35. Jung H. Lee (1998). Problems of Religious Pluralism: A Zen Critique of John Hick's Ontological Monomorphism. Philosophy East and West 48 (3):453-477.score: 144.0
    John Hick's "pluralistic hypothesis" of religion essays a comprehensive vision of religious diversity and its attendant soteriological, epistemological, and ontological implications. At the heart of Hick's proposal is the belief in the transcendental unity and soteriological identity of all religions. While coherent and compelling, Hick's model militates against those traditions that do not possess an ultimate noumenal referent that undergirds the phenomenal responses of culturally conditioned traditions. One of those traditions, namely Sōtō Zen Buddhism, at once defies Hick's categories (...)
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  36. Guy Axtell (2012). Achieving Knowledge: A Virtue-Theoretic Account of Epistemic Normativity. By John Greco. (Cambridge UP, 2010. Pp. X + 205. Price £17.99/US$29.99.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):208-211.score: 144.0
    A Review of John Greco's book Acheiving Knowledge. The critical points I make involve three claims Greco makes that represent common ground between the reliabilists (including agent reliabilists like himself) and the character epistemologists (which would include myself): I. Such virtues are often needed to make our cognitive abilities reliable (to turn mere faculties into excellences); II. Such virtues might be essentially involved in goods other than knowledge; III. Such virtues might be valuable in themselves.
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  37. Heather Dyke (2007). Words, Pictures and Ontology: A Commentary on John Heil's From an Ontological Point of View. SWIF Philosophy of Mind Review 6:31-41.score: 144.0
    The title of John Heil’s book From an Ontological Point of View is, of course, an adaptation of the title of Quine’s influential collection of essays From a Logical Point of View, published fifty years earlier in 1953. Quine’s book marked the beginning of a sea change in philosophy, away from ordinary language, armchair philosophising involving introspective examination of concepts, towards a more rigorous, analytical and scientific approach to answering philosophical questions. Heil’s book will, I think, mark the beginning (...)
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  38. Dermot Moran (2004). The Philosophy of John Scottus Eriugena: A Study of Idealism in the Middle Ages. Cambridge University Press.score: 144.0
    This work is a substantial contribution to the history of philosophy. Its subject, the ninth-century philosopher John Scottus Eriugena, developed a form of idealism that owed as much to the Greek Neoplatonic tradition as to the Latin fathers and anticipated the priority of the subject in its modern, most radical statement: German idealism. Moran has written the most comprehensive study yet of Eriugena's philosophy, tracing the sources of his thinking and analyzing his most important text, the Periphyseon. (...)
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  39. R. Sparrow (2012). Fear of a Female Planet: How John Harris Came to Endorse Eugenic Social Engineering. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (1):4-7.score: 144.0
    In this paper, I respond to criticisms by John Harris, contained in a commentary on my article “Harris, harmed states, and sexed bodies”, which appeared in the Journal of Medical Ethics, volume 37, number 5. I argue that Harris's response to my criticisms exposes the strong eugenic tendencies in his own thought, when he suggests that the reproductive obligations of parents should be determined with reference to a claim about what would enhance ‘society’ or ‘the species’.
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  40. Tamar Schapiro (2011). Empathy as a Moral Concept: Comments on John Deigh's "Empathy, Justice, and Jurisprudence&Quot;. Southern Journal of Philosophy 49 (s1):91-98.score: 144.0
    In these brief comments, I explore some ambiguities concerning John Deigh's notion of empathy in relation to morality and justice. First, does Deigh conceive of empathy as a morally neutral capacity that can be used for good or bad purposes or, rather, as a capacity that presupposes a moral orientation? I look to his previous work and find evidence supporting both readings. I suggest that the right way to understand empathy is as a moral notion. Empathy is the product (...)
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  41. Laurence Kaufmann (2005). Self-in-a-Vat: On John Searle's Ontology of Reasons for Acting. Philosophy of the Social Sciences 35 (4):447-479.score: 144.0
    John Searle has recently developed a theory of reasons for acting that intends to rescue the freedom of the will, endangered by causal determinism, whether physical or psychological. To achieve this purpose, Searle postulates a series of "gaps" that are supposed toendowthe self with free will. Reviewing key steps in Searle's argument, this article shows that such an undertaking cannot be successfully completed because of its solipsist premises. The author argues that reasons for acting do not have a subjective, (...)
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  42. Albert G. A. Balz & John Dewey (1949). A Letter to Mr. Dewey Concerning John Dewey's Doctrine of Possibility, Published Together with His Reply. Journal of Philosophy 46 (11):313-342.score: 144.0
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  43. Thomas Aastrup Rømer (2012). Imagination and Judgment in John Dewey's Philosophy: Intelligent Transactions in a Democratic Context. Educational Philosophy and Theory 44 (2):133-150.score: 144.0
    In this essay, I attempt to interpret the educational philosophy of John Dewey in a way that accomplishes two goals. The first of these is to avoid any reference to Dewey as a propagator of a particular scientific method or to any of the individualist and cognitivist ideas that is sometimes associated with him. Secondly, I want to overcome the tendency to interpret Dewey as a naturalist by looking at his concept of intelligence. It is argued that ‘intelligent experience’ (...)
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  44. Robert S. Westman (2013). The Copernican Question Revisited: A Reply to Noel Swerdlow and John Heilbron. Perspectives on Science 21 (1):100-136.score: 144.0
    In separate reviews of The Copernican Question published in the Summer 2012 issue of this journal, Noel Swerdlow and John Heilbron find little that meets their approval while failing to provide readers with a full and accurate summary of the book’s major claims and arguments.* The reviewers engage in an exercise in deconstructive surgery, essentially breaking down and reconstituting the work into separate studies. Swerdlow, who devotes most of his twenty-five page treatment to chapter 3 (with brief side-glances at (...)
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  45. Andrew Jason Cohen (2001). John Kekes, A Case for Conservatism:A Case for Conservatism. Ethics 111 (2):411-414.score: 144.0
    Review of John Kekes' *A Case for Conservatism*.
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  46. Robert Baker (2002). On Being a Bioethicist: A Review of John H. Evans Playing God?: Human Genetic Engineering and the Rationalization of Public Bioethical Debate. [REVIEW] American Journal of Bioethics 2 (2):65-69.score: 144.0
    (2002). On Being a Bioethicist: A Review of John H. Evans Playing God?: Human Genetic Engineering and the Rationalization of Public Bioethical Debate. The American Journal of Bioethics: Vol. 2, No. 2, pp. 65-69.
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  47. James J. Carpenter (2006). "The Development of a More Intelligent Citizenship": John Dewey and the Social Studies. Education and Culture 22 (2):31-42.score: 144.0
    : This paper describes John Dewey's attitude regarding the potential for the social studies as a vehicle for citizenship education. During the 1930s, Dewey specifically addressed his concerns for teaching social studies in two articles. By situating these concerns within his framework for democratic education, he outlines the potential for creating participatory citizens. This goal for citizenship education is still relevant today, especially given the current political climate.
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  48. Richard Gaskin (2006). Experience and the World's Own Language: A Critique of John Mcdowell's Empiricism. Oxford University Press.score: 144.0
    John McDowell's "minimal empiricism" is one of the most influential and widely discussed doctrines in contemporary philosophy. Richard Gaskin subjects it to careful examination and criticism, arguing that it has unacceptable consequences, and in particular that it mistakenly rules out something we all know to be the case: that infants and non-human animals experience a world. Gaskin traces the errors in McDowell's empiricism to their source, and presents his own, still more minimal, version of empiricism, suggesting that a correct (...)
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  49. Ted Peters (2010). Constructing a Theology of Evolution: Building on John Haught. Zygon 45 (4):921-937.score: 144.0
    The construction of a distinctively Christian “theology of evolution” or “theistic evolution” requires the incorporation of the science of evolutionary biology while building a more comprehensive worldview within which all things are understood in relation to our creating and redeeming God. In the form of theses, this article brings four support pillars to the constructive work: (1) orienting evolutionary history to the God of grace; (2) affirming purpose for nature even if we cannot see purpose in nature; (3) employing the (...)
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  50. Kip S. Thorne & Wojciech H. Zurek (1986). John Archibald Wheeler: A Few Highlights of His Contributions to Physics. [REVIEW] Foundations of Physics 16 (2):79-89.score: 144.0
    The following quotations describe in “nutshells” a few highlights of John Archibald Wheeler's contributions to physics. The contributions are arranged in roughly the following order: (i) concrete research results, (ii) innovative ideas that have become foundations for the research of others, (iii) insights that give guidance for the development of physics over the coming decades. Since most of Wheeler's work contains strong elements of two or even all three of these characteristics, the editors have not attempted to delineate the (...)
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