Search results for 'A. N. Liu' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Darren A. Natale, Cecilia N. Arighi, Winona Barker, Judith Blake, Ti-Cheng Chang, Zhangzhi Hu, Hongfang Liu, Barry Smith & Cathy H. Wu (2007). Framework for a Protein Ontology. BMC Bioinformatics, Nov. 2007, 8(Suppl. 9) 8 (9):S1.score: 1350.0
    Biomedical ontologies are emerging as critical tools in genomic and proteomic research where complex data in disparate resources need to be integrated. A number of ontologies exist (...)
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  2. A. N. Liu (1987). Wrongful Life: Some of the Problems. Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (2):69-73.score: 960.0
    The author considers that some of the reasonings used by both the American and English courts against recognising a wrongful life claim are far from persuasive. However, (...)
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  3. J. M. Liu, W. C. Lin, Y. M. Chen, H. W. Wu, N. S. Yao, L. T. Chen & J. Whang-Peng (1999). The Status of the Do-Not-Resuscitate Order in Chinese Clinical Trial Patients in a Cancer Centre. Journal of Medical Ethics 25 (4):309-314.score: 900.0
    OBJECTIVE: To report and analyse the pattern of end-of-life decision making for terminal Chinese cancer patients. DESIGN: Retrospective descriptive study. SETTING: A cancer clinical trials unit (...) in a large teaching hospital. PATIENTS: From April 1992 to August 1997, 177 consecutive deaths of cancer clinical trial patients were studied. MAIN MEASUREMENT: Basic demographic data, patient status at the time of signing a DNR consent, or at the moment of returning home to die are documented, and circumstances surrounding these events evaluated. RESULTS: DNR orders were written for 64.4% of patients. Patients in pain (odds ratio 0.45, 95% CI 0.22-0.89), especially if requiring opioid analgesia (odds ratio 0.40, 95% CI 0.21-0.77), were factors associated with a higher probability of such an order. Thirty-five patients were taken home to die, a more likely occurrence if the patient was over 75 years (odds ratio 0.12, 95% CI 0.04-0.34), had children (odds ratio 0.14, 95% CI 0.02-0.79), had Taiwanese as a first language (odds ratio 6.74, 95% CI 3.04-14.93), or was unable to intake orally (odds ratio 2.73, 95% CI 1.26-5.92). CPR was performed in 30 patients, none survived to discharge. CONCLUSIONS: DNR orders are instituted in a large proportion of dying Chinese cancer patients in a cancer centre, however, the order is seldom signed by the patient personally. This study also illustrates that as many as 20% of dying patients are taken home to die, in accordance with local custom. (shrink)
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  4. Y. Liu, A. Bisazza, M. M. Botvinick, N. Chomsky, C. DiYanni, L. Feigenson, W. T. Fitch, J. I. Flombaum, U. Hahn & M. D. Hauser (2005). Leslie, AM, 153. Cognition 97:337.score: 810.0
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  5. Justin N. Wood, Elizabeth S. Spelke, David Barner, Jesse Snedeker, Min Wang, Charles A. Perfetti, Ying Liu, Filip van Opstal, Bert Reynvoet & Tom Verguts (2005). B1B11. Cognition 97:339-341.score: 810.0
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  6. Chuang Liu (2004). Approximations, Idealizations, and Models in Statistical Mechanics. Erkenntnis 60 (2):235-263.score: 450.0
    In this paper, a criticism of the traditional theories of approximation and idealization is given as a summary of previous works. After identifying the real purpose and (...)
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  7. L. -C. Huang, C. -H. Chen, H. -L. Liu, H. -Y. Lee, N. -H. Peng, T. -M. Wang & Y. -C. Chang (2013). The Attitudes of Neonatal Professionals Towards End-of-Life Decision-Making for Dying Infants in Taiwan. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (6):382-386.score: 450.0
    The purposes of research were to describe the neonatal clinicians' personal views and attitudes on neonatal ethical decision-making, to identify factors that might affect these attitudes (...)and to compare the attitudes between neonatal physicians and neonatal nurses in Taiwan. Research was a cross-sectional design and a questionnaire was used to reach different research purposes. A convenient sample was used to recruit 24 physicians and 80 neonatal nurses from four neonatal intensive care units in Taiwan. Most participants agreed with suggesting a do not resuscitate (DNR) order to parents for dying neonates (86.5%). However, the majority agreed with talking to patients about DNR orders is difficult (76.9%). Most participants agree that review by the clinical ethics committee is needed before the recommendation ofDNRto parents (94.23%) and nurses were significantly more likely than physicians to agree to this (p=0.043). During the end-of-life care, most clinicians accepted to continue current treatment without adding others (70%) and withholding of emergency treatments (75%); however, active euthanasia, the administration of drug to end-of-life, was not considered acceptable by both physicians and nurses in this research (96%). Based on our research results, providing continuing educational training and a formal consulting service in moral courage for neonatal clinicians are needed. In Taiwan, neonatal physicians and nurses hold similar values and attitudes towards end-of-life decisions for neonates. In order to improve the clinicians' communication skills with parents about DNR options and to change clinicians' attitudes for providing enough pain-relief medicine to dying neonates, providing continuing educational training and a formal consulting service in moral courage are needed. (shrink)
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  8. Naoko Taguchi, Shuai Li & Yan Liu (2013). Comprehension of Conversational Implicature in L2 Chinese. Pragmatics and Cognition 21 (1):139-157.score: 450.0
    This study examined the ability to comprehend conventional and non-conventional implicatures, and the effect of proficiency and learning context (foreign language learners vs. heritage learners) on (...)comprehension of implicature in L2 Chinese. Participants were three groups of college students of Chinese: elementary-level foreign language learners ( n =21), advanced-level foreign language learners ( n =25), and advanced-level heritage learners ( n =25). They completed a 36-item computer-delivered listening test measuring their ability to comprehend three types of implicature: conventional indirect refusals, conventional indirect opinions, and non-conventional indirect opinions. Comprehension was analyzed for accuracy (scores on a multiple-choice measure) and comprehension speed (average time taken to answer items correctly). There was a significant effect of implicature type on accuracy, but not on comprehension speed. A significant effect of participant group was observed on accuracy, but the effect was mixed on comprehension speed. (shrink)
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  9. Nianzheng Liu (1994). Semilinear Cell Decomposition. Journal of Symbolic Logic 59 (1):199-208.score: 450.0
    We obtain a p-adic semilinear cell decomposition theorem using methods developed by Denef in [Journal fur die Reine und Angewandte Mathematik, vol. 369 (1986), pp. 154-166 (...)]. We also prove that any set definable with quantifiers in (0, 1, +, =, λq, Pn){nN,qQp} may be defined without quantifiers, where λq is scalar multiplication by q and Pn is a unary predicate which denotes the nonzero nth powers in the p-adic field Qp. Such a set is called a p-adic semilinear set in this paper. Some further considerations are discussed in the last section. (shrink)
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  10. [deleted]Zhang Chen, Min Liu, Donald William Gross & Christian Beaulieu (2013). Graph Theoretical Analysis of Developmental Patterns of the White Matter Network. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 450.0
    Understanding the development of human brain organization is critical for gaining insight into how the enhancement of cognitive processes is related to the fine-tuning of the (...)brain network. However, the developmental trajectory of the large-scale white matter (WM) network is not fully understood. Here, using graph theory, we examine developmental changes in the organization of WM networks in 180 typically-developing participants. WM networks were constructed using whole brain tractography and 78 cortical regions of interest were extracted from each participant. The subjects were first divided into 5 equal sample size (n=36) groups (early childhood: 6.0-9.7 years; late childhood: 9.8-12.7 years; adolescence: 12.9-17.5 years; young adult: 17.6-21.8 years; adult: 21.9-29.6 years). Most prominent changes in the topological properties of developing brain networks occur at late childhood and adolescence. During late childhood period, the structural brain network showed significant increase in the global efficiency but decrease in modularity, suggesting a shift of topological organization toward a more randomized configuration. However, while preserving most topological features, there was a significant increase in the local efficiency at adolescence, suggesting the dynamic process of rewiring and rebalancing brain connections at different growth stages. In addition, several pivotal hubs were identified that are vital for the global coordination of information flow over the whole brain network across all age groups. Significant increases of nodal efficiency were present in several regions such as precuneus at late childhood. Finally, a stable and functionally/anatomically related modular organization was identified throughout the development of the WM network. This study used network analysis to elucidate the topological changes in brain maturation, paving the way for developing novel methods for analyzing disrupted brain connectivity in neurodevelopmental disorders. (shrink)
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  11. Igor Hanzel (2008). Idealizations and Concretizations in Laws and Explanations in Physics. Journal for General Philosophy of Science 39 (2):273 - 301.score: 243.0
    The paper tries to provide an alternative to Hempels approach to scientific laws and scientific explanation as given in his D-N model. It starts with a (...) brief exposition of the main characteristics of Hempels approach to deductive explanations based on universal scientific laws and analyzes the problems and paradoxes inherent in this approach. By way of solution, it analyzes the scientific laws and explanations in classical mechanics and then reconstructs the corresponding models of explanation, as well as the types of scientific laws appearing in it. Finally, it compares this reconstruction with the approaches of J. Woodward and C. <span class='Hi'>Hitchcockspan>, C. Liu and with the views of M. Thalos on analytic mechanics. (shrink)
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  12. Liu Hui-Lin (1979). The Poverty of Philosophy and the Philosophy of Poverty. Contemporary Chinese Thought 11 (2):55-76.score: 45.0
    No apology, I imagine, is necessary for the appearance of this translation\nof Marx's "Misere de la Philosophic" On the contrary it is strange\nthat it should (...)
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  13. N. Shanks & R. Gardner (eds.) (2000). Logic, Probability and Science. Atlanta: Rodopi.score: 45.0
    Otdvio Bueno, Empiricism, Mathematical Truth and Mathematical Knowledge 219 Commentary by Chuang Liu. Reply by Bueno. Chuang Liu, Coins and Electrons: A ...
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