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A. Papanikitas [3]Andrew Papanikitas [2]
  1. Andrew Papanikitas (2013). Medical Ethics and Sociology. Elsevier/Mosby.
    Foundations of medical ethics and law -- Professionalism and medical ethics -- The doctor, the patient, and society -- Ethics and law at the beginning and end of life -- Healthcare commissioning and resource allocation -- Introduction to sociology and disease -- Experience of health and illness -- Organization of health care provision in the UK -- Inequalities in health and health care provision -- Epidemiology and public health -- Clinical governance.
     
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  2. J. Gardner, A. Papanikitas, J. Owens & H. Engward (2011). Emerging Themes in the Everyday Ethics of Primary Care: A Report From an Interdisciplinary Workshop. Clinical Ethics 6 (4):211-214.
    We report key themes arising from a postgraduate workshop organized by the King's Interdisciplinary Discussion Society (KIDS) held in April 2011. KIDS believe that health is a phenomenon that transcends disciplinary boundaries, and therefore issues relating to health care and medical ethics are best addressed with an interdisciplinary approach. The workshop, entitled ‘Everyday Ethics and Primary Healthcare’, included poster presentations and oral presentations from participants from a range of disciplines and occupational backgrounds which highlighted the challenges faced by primary health-care (...)
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  3. A. Papanikitas (2011). Ethicality and Confidentiality: Is There an Inverse-Care Issue in General Practice Ethics? Clinical Ethics 6 (4):186-190.
    This paper discusses confidentiality as a routine issue of concern to British general practitioners participating in a qualitative study as well as in contemporaneous practice literature. While keen to reflect on routine issues, such as confidentiality, participants who professed a lack of expertise in medical ethics also perceived reluctance or inability to access educational resources or ethics support. Such lack of ability might include a perception of non-entitlement to access advice and support, a fear of criticism, or simply that resources (...)
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  4. Andrew Papanikitas & Barbara Prainsack (2011). James F. Drane: A Liberal Catholic Bioethics. Muenster, DE: Lit Verlag. 2010, 290 Pages. Philosophia 39 (4):771-774.
    James F. Drane: A Liberal Catholic Bioethics. Muenster, DE: Lit Verlag. 2010, 290 Pages Content Type Journal Article Category Book Review Pages 771-774 DOI 10.1007/s11406-011-9319-4 Authors Andrew Papanikitas, Department of Education and Professional Studies, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London, WC2R 2LS UK Barbara Prainsack, Kings Institute of Social Science and Public Policy, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London, WC2R 2LS UK Journal Philosophia Online ISSN 1574-9274 Print ISSN 0048-3893 Journal Volume Volume 39 Journal Issue Volume 39, Number 4.
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  5. A. Papanikitas (2009). Splitting Hairs Over the Definition of Murder: Thomas Aquinas and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Clinical Ethics 4 (4):211-212.
    A recent article in the March 2009 edition of Clinical Ethics stated that, ‘In the Summa Theologica, Thomas Aquinas discusses how murder may be justified in self defence’, provided that killing is not intended. This statement is open to challenge on historical and semantic grounds, with respect to the writings of the 13th Century Roman Catholic philosopher Thomas Aquinas (1225–1274). A better appreciation of Aquinas' writings on this topic could inform the debate relating to medical end-of-life decisions. The normatively loaded (...)
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