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  1. A. S. Iltis (2013). Parents, Adolescents, and Consent for Research Participation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 38 (3):332-346.
    Decisions concerning children in the health care setting have engendered significant controversy and sparked ethics policies and statements, legal action, and guidelines regarding who ought to make decisions involving children and how such decisions ought to be made. Traditionally, parents have been the default decision-makers for children not only with regard to health care but with regard to other matters, such as religious practice and education. In recent decades, there has been a steady trend away from the view that parents (...)
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  2. A. S. Iltis (2010). First Things First: On the Importance of Foundational Commitments. Christian Bioethics 16 (2):229-240.
    Peter Dabrock argues that western Christian roots have shaped the western European mindset, that of believers and secular thinkers alike, such that (1) western Europeans hold the concept of human dignity as a central moral category and believe that respect for human dignity should frame social and political decisions and respect for human dignity is the foundation of bioethics, (2) Christians and secular thinkers can engage each other on secular terms using the shared language and focus on human dignity, and (...)
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  3. A. S. Iltis (2010). Organ Donation and Global Bioethics. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (2):213-219.
    (No abstract is available for this citation).
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  4. A. S. Iltis (2010). Toward a Coherent Account of Pediatric Decision Making. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (5):526-552.
    Within and among societies, there are competing understandings of the status of children, including debates over whether they can bear rights and, if so, which rights they bear and against whom, and their capacity to make decisions and be held responsible and accountable for actions. There also are different understandings of what constitutes a family; what authority parents have over and regarding their children; and what should happen to children who are without parents because of death, desertion, or imprisonment. These (...)
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  5. A. S. Iltis & M. J. Cherry (2010). Death Revisited: Rethinking Death and the Dead Donor Rule. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 35 (3):223-241.
    Traditionally, people were recognized as being dead using cardio-respiratory criteria: individuals who had permanently stopped breathing and whose heart had permanently stopped beating were dead. Technological developments in the middle of the twentieth century and the advent of the intensive care unit made it possible to sustain cardio-respiratory and other functions in patients with severe brain injury who previously would have lost such functions permanently shortly after sustaining a brain injury. What could and should physicians caring for such patients do? (...)
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  6. A. S. Iltis (2009). Payments to Normal Healthy Volunteers in Phase 1 Trials: Avoiding Undue Influence While Distributing Fairly the Burdens of Research Participation. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 34 (1):68-90.
    Clinical investigators must engage in just subject recruitment and selection and avoid unduly influencing research participation. There may be tension between the practice of keeping payments to participants low to avoid undue influence and the requirements of justice when recruiting normal healthy volunteers for phase 1 drug studies. By intentionally keeping payments low to avoid unduly influenced participation, investigators, on the recommendation or insistence of institutional review boards, may be targeting or systematically recruiting healthy adult members of lower socio-economic groups (...)
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  7. A. S. Iltis (2009). The Failed Search for the Neutral in the Secular: Public Bioethics in the Face of the Culture Wars. Christian Bioethics 15 (3):220-233.
    Public bioethics focuses on deliberating about, recommending, or establishing social policies or practices concerning health care and biotechnology. A brace of premises underlies much of the work of public bioethics. First, there is the view that, if one approaches reality and human life as if both were without ultimate significance, one will find that one shares a common public bioethics. That is, if one abstains not only from any religious concerns, but even from philosophical reflections on the circumstance that life (...)
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  8. A. S. Iltis & M. J. Cherry (2008). First Do No Harm: Critical Analyses of the Roads to Health Care Reform. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 33 (5):403-415.
    Health care reform poses numerous challenges. A core challenge is to make health care more efficient and effective without causing more harm than benefit. Additionally, those fashioning health-care policy must encourage patients to exercise caution and restraint when expending scarce resources; restrict the ability of politicians to advance their careers by promising alluring but costly entitlements, many of which they will not be able to deliver; face the demographic challenges of an aging population; and avoid regulations that create significant inefficiencies (...)
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  9. A. S. Iltis (2005). Stopping Trials Early for Commercial Reasons: The Risk-Benefit Relationship as a Moral Compass. Journal of Medical Ethics 31 (7):410-414.
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  10. A. S. Iltis (2001). Institutional Integrity in Roman Catholic Health Care Institutions. Christian Bioethics 7 (1):95-103.
    Issues of institutional identity and integrity in Roman Catholic health care institutions have been addressed at the level of individual institutions as well as by organizations of Catholic health care providers and at various levels in the Church hierarchy. The papers by Carol Taylor, C.S.F.N, Thomas Shannon, Kevin O'Rourke, O.P., Gerard Magill in this volume provide a significant contribution to concerns of Roman Catholic health care institutions as they face the challenges of providing health care in a secular, pluralistic, market-driven (...)
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