Search results for 'A. Thompson E., Lutz' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Evan Thompson, A. Lutz & D. Cosmelli (2005). Neurophenomenology: An Introduction for Neurophilosophers. In Andrew Brook & Kathleen Akins (eds.), Cognition and the Brain: The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement. Cambridge University Press.score: 15600.0
    • An adequate conceptual framework is still needed to account for phenomena that (i) have a first-person, subjective-experiential or phenomenal character; (ii) are (usually) reportable and describable (in humans); and (iii) are neurobiologically realized.2 • The conscious subject plays an unavoidable epistemological role in characterizing the explanadum of consciousness through first-person descriptive reports. The experimentalist is then able to link first-person data and third-person data. Yet the generation of first-person data raises difficult epistemological issues about the relation of second-order awareness (...)
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  2. Antoine Lutz & Evan Thompson (2003). Neurophenomenology. Journal of Consciousness Studies 10 (9-10):31-52.score: 12150.0
    _sciousness called ‘neurophenomenology’ (Varela 1996) and illustrates it with a_ _recent pilot study (Lutz et al., 2002). At a theoretical level, neurophenomenology_ _pursues an embodied and large-scale dynamical approach to the_ _neurophysiology of consciousness (Varela 1995; Thompson and Varela 2001;_ _Varela and Thompson 2003). At a methodological level, the neurophenomeno-_ _logical strategy is to make rigorous and extensive use of first-person data about_ _subjective experience as a heuristic to describe and quantify the large-scale_ _neurodynamics of consciousness ( (...) 2002). The paper foocuses on_ _neurophenomenology in relation to three challenging methodological issues_ _about incorporating first-person data into cognitive neuroscience: (i) first-person_ _reports can be biased or inaccurate; (ii) the process of generating first-person_ _reports about an experience can modify that experience; and (iii) there is an ‘ex-_ _planatory gap’ in our understanding of how to relate first-person, phenomeno-_ _logical data to third-person, biobehavioural data._. (shrink)
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  3. Antoine Lutz, John D. Dunne & Richard J. Davidson, And Thompson E.score: 1860.0
    The overall goal of this essay is to explore the initial findings of neuroscientific research on meditation; in doing so, the essay also suggests potential avenues of further inquiry. The essay consists of three sections that, while integral to the essay as a whole, may also be read independently. The first section, “Defining Meditation,” notes the need for a more precise understanding of meditation as a scientific explanandum. Arguing for the importance of distinguishing the particularities of various traditions, the section (...)
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  4. M. F. M. Lutz & E. E. Kolomeitsev (2001). Covariant Meson–Baryon Scattering with Chiral and Large Nc Constraints. Foundations of Physics 31 (12):1671-1702.score: 450.0
    We give a review of recent progress on the application of the relativistic chiral SU(3) Lagrangian to meson–baryon scattering. It is shown that a combined chiral and 1/Nc expansion of the Bethe–Salpeter interaction kernel leads to a good description of the kaon–nucleon, antikaon–nucleon and pion–nucleon scattering data typically up to laboratory momenta of p lab ≃500 MeV. We solve the covariant coupled channel Bethe–Salpeter equation with the interaction kernel truncated to chiral order Q 3 where we include only those terms (...)
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  5. Kai Lutz, Roman Puorger, Marcus Cheetham & Lutz Jancke (2013). Development of ERN Together with an Internal Model of Audio-Motor Associations. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.score: 450.0
    The brain’s reactions to error are manifested in several event related potentials (ERP) components, derived from electroencephalographic (EEG) signals. Although these components have been known for decades, their interpretation is still controversial. A current hypothesis (first indicator hypothesis) claims that the first indication of an action being erroneous leads to a negative deflection of the EEG signal over frontal midline areas. In some cases this requires sensory feedback in the form of knowledge of results (KR). If KR is given, then (...)
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  6. Lutz Antoine, A. Thompson E., Lutz & D. Cosmelli, Neurophenomenology: An Introduction for Neurophilosophers in Cognition and the Brain : The Philosophy and Neuroscience Movement.score: 198.0
  7. Marcos Lutz Müller (2006). Sartre e a Crise do Fundamento. Doispontos 3 (2).score: 153.0
    Após uma sucinta rememoração da trajetória pessoal e intelectual de Gerd A. Bornheim (I), ressalta-se a originalidade da sua leitura da ontologia fenomenológica de Sartre, focada no tema da “crise do fundamento”, pensado na clave heideggeriana da crise da metafísica enquanto história do esquecimento do ser (II). A radicalização ontológica da intencionalidade, empreendida por Sartre mediante os conceitos de “nada” e “nadificação”, é analisada por Bornheim no horizonte da metafísica da participação, como um caso limite desta, que suprime a estrutura (...)
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  8. Marcos Lutz Müller (2013). A Dialética Negativa da Moralidade e a Resolução Especulativa da Contradição da Consciência Moral Moderna. Discurso 27:83-116.score: 153.0
    Neste artigo, mostramos que a apresentação da constituição da consciência moral moderna, em Hegel, resultante da reformulação dialético-especulativa da autonomia moral kantiana, é essencialmente crítica e se condensa numa "dialética negativa".
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  9. Marcos Lutz Müller (1994). A ambigüidade da consciência moral moderna e da dialéctica da sua resoluçâo na eticidade. Escritos de Filosofía 13 (25-26):209-238.score: 117.0
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  10. Robert C. Solomon (ed.) (2003). What is an Emotion?: Classic and Contemporary Readings. OUP USA.score: 81.0
    What is an Emotion?, 2/e, draws together important selections from classical and contemporary theories and debates about emotion. Utilizing sources from a variety of subject areas including philosophy, psychology, and biology, editor Robert Solomon provides an illuminating look at the "affective" side of psychology and philosophy from the perspective of the world's great thinkers. Part One of the book features five classic readings from Aristotle, the Stoics, Descartes, Spinoza, and Hume. Part Two offers classic and contemporary theories from the social (...)
     
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  11. Marcus Cheetham, Pascal Suter & Lutz Jäncke (2011). The Human Likeness Dimension of the “Uncanny Valley Hypothesis”: Behavioral and Functional MRI Findings. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5:126.score: 45.0
    The uncanny valley hypothesis (Mori, 1970) predicts differential experience of negative and positive affect as a function of human likeness. Affective experience of realistic humanlike robots and computer-generated characters (avatars) dominates “uncanny” research, but findings are inconsistent. How objects are actually perceived along the hypothesis’ dimension of human likeness (DOH), defined only in terms of human physical similarity, is unknown. To examine whether the DOH can be defined also in terms of effects of categorical perception (CP), stimuli from morph continua (...)
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  12. Lutz Preuss & Donna Brown (2012). Business Policies on Human Rights: An Analysis of Their Content and Prevalence Among FTSE 100 Firms. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 109 (3):289-299.score: 45.0
    The new millennium has witnessed a growing concern over the impact of multinational enterprises (MNEs) on human rights. Hence, this article explores (1) how wide-spread corporate policies on human rights are amongst large corporations, specifically the FTSE 100 constituent firms, (2) whether any sectors are particularly active in designing human rights policies and (3) where corporations have adopted such policies what their content is. In terms of adoption rates of human rights policies, evidence of exemplary approaches in individual companies contrasts (...)
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  13. Marcus Cheetham, Ivana Pavlovic, Nicola Jordan, Pascal Suter & Lutz Jancke (2013). Category Processing and the Human Likeness Dimension of the Uncanny Valley Hypothesis: Eye-Tracking Data. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 45.0
    The Uncanny Valley Hypothesis (Mori, 1970) predicts that perceptual difficulty distinguishing between a humanlike object (e.g., lifelike prosthetic hand, mannequin) and its human counterpart evokes negative affect. Research has focussed on affect, with inconsistent results, but little is known about how objects along the hypothesis’ dimension of human likeness (DHL) are actually perceived. This study used morph continua based on human and highly realistic computer-generated (avatar) faces to represent the DHL. Total number and dwell time of fixations to facial features (...)
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  14. Marcus Cheetham, Andreas Pedroni, Angus Antley, Mel Slater & Lutz Jäncke (2009). Virtual Milgram: Empathic Concern or Personal Distress? Evidence From Functional MRI and Dispositional Measures. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 3.score: 45.0
    One motive for behaving as the agent of another’s aggression appears to be anchored in as yet unelucidated mechanisms of obedience to authority. In a recent partial replication of Milgram’s obedience paradigm within an immersive virtual environment, participants administered pain to a female virtual human and observed her suffering. Whether the participants’ response to the latter was more akin to other-oriented empathic concern for her well-being or to a self-oriented aversive state of personal distress in response to her distress is (...)
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  15. Hélène Otzenberger Marie-Noëlle Metz-Lutz, Yannick Bressan, Nathalie Heider (2010). What Physiological Changes and Cerebral Traces Tell Us About Adhesion to Fiction During Theater-Watching? Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 4.score: 45.0
    Live theater is typically designed to alter the state of mind of the audience. Indeed, the perceptual inputs issuing from a live theatrical performance are intended to represent something else, and the actions, emphasised by the writing and staging, are the key prompting the adhesion of viewers to fiction, i.e. their belief that it is real. This phenomenon raises the issue of the cognitive processes governing access to a fictional reality during live theater and of their cerebral underpinnings. To get (...)
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