Search results for 'A. Tsuchiya' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Christof Koch & Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2007). Phenomenology Without Conscious Access is a Form of Consciousness Without Top-Down Attention. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (5-6):509-510.score: 420.0
    We agree with Block's basic hypothesis postulating the existence of phenomenal consciousness without cognitive access. We explain such states in terms of consciousness without top-down, endogenous attention and speculate that their correlates may be a coalition of neurons that are consigned to the back of cortex, without access to working memory and planning in frontal cortex.
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  2. R. Cookson, C. McCabe & A. Tsuchiya (2008). Public Healthcare Resource Allocation and the Rule of Rescue. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (7):540-544.score: 300.0
    In healthcare, a tension sometimes arises between the injunction to do as much good as possible with scarce resources and the injunction to rescue identifiable individuals in immediate peril, regardless of cost (the “Rule of Rescue”). This tension can generate serious ethical and political difficulties for public policy makers faced with making explicit decisions about the public funding of controversial health technologies, such as costly new cancer drugs. In this paper we explore the appropriate role of the Rule of Rescue (...)
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  3. J. A. van Boxtel & N. Tsuchiya (2010). Consciousness and Attention: On Necessity and Sufficiency. Frontiers in Psychology 2:12.score: 300.0
     
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  4. P. Dolan & A. Tsuchiya (2012). It is the Lifetime That Matters: Public Preferences Over Maximising Health and Reducing Inequalities in Health. Journal of Medical Ethics 38 (9):571-573.score: 240.0
    Scarce healthcare resources can be allocated in many ways. The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence in the UK focuses on the size of the benefit relative to costs, yet we know that there is support among clinicians and the general public for reducing inequalities in health. This paper shows how the UK general public trade-off these sometimes competing objectives, and the data we gather allow us to show the weight given to different population groups, for example, 1 extra (...)
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  5. R. Kanai, N. Tsuchiya & F. A. J. Verstraten (2004). Featural, but Not Spatial, Attention Modulates Unconscious Processing of Visual Stimuli. In Robert Schwartz (ed.), Perception. Malden Ma: Blackwell Publishing. 8-8.score: 240.0
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  6. Melanie Boly, Anil K. Seth, Melanie Wilke, Paul Ingmundson, Bernard Baars, Steven Laureys, David Edelman & Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2013). Consciousness in Humans and Non-Human Animals: Recent Advances and Future Directions. Frontiers in Psychology 4.score: 120.0
    This joint article reflects the authors’ personal views regarding noteworthy advances in the neuroscience of consciousness in the last ten years, and suggests what we feel may be promising future directions. It is based on a small conference at the Samoset Resort in Rockport, Maine, USA, in July of 2012, organized by the Mind Science Foundation of San Antonio, Texas. Here, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of subjectivity in humans and other animals, including empirical, applied, technical and conceptual (...)
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  7. Shuo Wang, Ian Krajbich, Ralph Adolphs & Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2012). The Role of Risk Aversion in Non-Conscious Decision Making. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 120.0
    To what extent can people choose advantageously without knowing why they are making those choices? This hotly debated question has capitalized on the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT), in which people often learn to choose advantageously without appearing to know why. However, because the IGT is unconstrained in many respects, this finding remains debated and other interpretations are possible (e.g., risk aversion, ambiguity aversion, limits of working memory or insensitivity to reward/punishment can explain the finding of the IGT). Here we devised (...)
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  8. Ignacio Abásolo & Aki Tsuchiya (2013). Is More Health Always Better for Society? Exploring Public Preferences That Violate Monotonicity. Theory and Decision 74 (4):539-563.score: 120.0
    There has recently been some literature on the properties of a Health-Related Social Welfare Function (HRSWF). The aim of this article is to contribute to the analysis of the different properties of a HRSWF, paying particular attention to the monotonicity principle. For monotonicity to be fulfilled, any increase in individual health—other things equal—should result in an increase in social welfare. We elicit public preferences concerning trade-offs between the total level of health (concern for efficiency) and its distribution (concern for equality), (...)
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  9. J. J. Boxtel, N. Tsuchiya & C. Koch (2009). Consciousness and Attention: On Sufficiency and Necessity. Frontiers in Psychology 1:217-217.score: 120.0
    Recent research has slowly corroded a belief that selective attention and consciousness are so tightly entangled that they cannot be individually examined. In this review, we summarize psychophysical and neurophysiological evidence for a dissociation between top-down attention and consciousness. The evidence includes recent findings that show subjects can attend to perceptually invisible objects. More contentious is the finding that subjects can become conscious of an isolated object, or the gist of the scene in the near absence of top-down attention; we (...)
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  10. Georgios A. Keliris Alexander Maier, Theofanis I. Panagiotaropoulos, Naotsugu Tsuchiya (2012). Introduction to Research Topic – Binocular Rivalry: A Gateway to Studying Consciousness. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 60.0
    Introduction to Research Topic – Binocular Rivalry: A Gateway to Studying Consciousness.
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  11. Michael A. Cohen, Patrick Cavanagh, Marvin M. Chun & Ken Nakayama (2012). Response to Tsuchiya Et Al.: Considering Endogenous and Exogenous Attention. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16 (11):528.score: 36.0
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  12. Tsuchiya Naotsugu (2012). Towards a System-Level Understanding of Conscious Vision: A Study with Electrocorticogram (ECoG) Recording Under Continuous Flash Suppression (CFS). Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.score: 36.0
  13. Christopher Mole (2008). Attention in the Absence of Consciousness? Trends in Cognitive Sciences 12 (2):44.score: 24.0
    A response to Christof Koch and Naotsugu Tsuchiya's 'Attention and Consciousness: Two Distinct Brain Processes'.
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  14. Felipe De Brigard (forthcoming). Attention, Consciousness, and Commonsense. Journal of Consciousness Studies.score: 24.0
    The relation of dependency between consciousness and attention is, once again, a matter of heated debate among scientists and philosophers. There are at least three general views on the issue. First, there are those who suggest that attention is both necessary and sufficient for consciousness (e.g. Posner, 1994; Prinz, 2000, forthcoming). Second, there are those who suggest that even though attention is necessary for consciousness, it may not be sufficient (e.g. Moran & Desimone, 1984; Rensink et al., 1997; Merikle & (...)
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  15. Verena Willenbockel, Franco Lepore, Dang Khoa Nguyen, Alain Bouthillier & Frédéric Gosselin (2012). Spatial Frequency Tuning During the Conscious and Non-Conscious Perception of Emotional Facial Expressions – An Intracranial ERP Study. Frontiers in Psychology 3.score: 24.0
    Previous studies have shown that complex visual stimuli, such as emotional facial expressions, can influence brain activity independently of the observers’ awareness. Little is known yet, however, about the “informational correlates” of consciousness—i.e., which low-level information correlates with brain activation during conscious vs. non-conscious perception. Here, we investigated this question in the spatial frequency (SF) domain. We examined which SFs in disgusted and fearful facial expressions modulate activation in the insula and amygdala over time and as a function of awareness, (...)
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