Search results for 'AJ Hamilton' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. AJ Hamilton, Staff.score: 240.0
    According to the acousmatic thesis defended by Roger Scruton and others, to hear sounds as music is to divorce them from the source or cause of their production. Non-acousmatic experience involves attending to the worldly cause of the sound; in acousmatic experience, sound is detached from that cause. The acousmatic concept originates with Pythagoras, and was developed in the work of 20th century musique concrète composers such as Pierre Schaeffer. The concept yields important insights into the nature of musical experience, (...)
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  2. Ontario Hamilton (2000). Canada. Art Gallery of Hamilton. In Mike Crang & N. J. Thrift (eds.), Thinking Space. Routledge.score: 180.0
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  3. G. J. Hamilton & A. H. Smith (1901). Gavin Hamilton's Letters to Charles Townley. Journal of Hellenic Studies 21:306.score: 180.0
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  4. Lawrence Hamilton (2009). Human Needs and Political Judgment Lawrence Hamilton. In Boudewijn Paul de Bruin & Christopher F. Zurn (eds.), New Waves in Political Philosophy. Palgrave Macmillan. 40.score: 180.0
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  5. Andrew Hamilton & Christopher Dimond (2012). Groups, Individuals, and Evolutionary Restraints: The Making of the Contemporary Debate Over Group Selection. Biology and Philosophy 27 (2):299-312.score: 60.0
    Groups, individuals, and evolutionary restraints : the making of the contemporary debate over group selection Content Type Journal Article Pages 1-14 DOI 10.1007/s10539-011-9255-5 Authors Andrew Hamilton, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Christopher C. Dimond, Center for Biology and Society, School of Life Sciences, Arizona State University, Tempe, AZ 85287-4501 USA Journal Biology and Philosophy Online ISSN 1572-8404 Print ISSN 0169-3867.
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  6. A. G. Hamilton (1978). Logic for Mathematicians. Cambridge University Press.score: 60.0
    Intended for logicians and mathematicians, this text is based on Dr. Hamilton's lectures to third and fourth year undergraduates in mathematics at the ...
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  7. Sue Hamilton (2001). Indian Philosophy: A Very Short Introduction. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    India has a long, rich, and diverse tradition of philosophical thought, spanning some two and a half millenia and encompassing several major religious traditions. Now, in this intriguing introduction to Indian philosophy, the diversity of Indian thought is emphasized. It is structured around six schools of thought that have received classic status. Sue Hamilton explores how the traditions have attempted to understand the nature of reality in terms of inner or spiritual quest and introduces distinctively Indian concepts, such as (...)
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  8. James R. Hamilton (2007). The Art of Theater. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 60.0
    Hamilton argues that theatrical performances have always been regarded as works produced for inspection and evaluation in their own right. The reason this has been obscured is the enormously successful text-based literary tradition in modern European theater. To show why this is as it should be, Hamilton shows how theater's spectators pick out, grasp, and assess performances without reference to the texts they employ, even within that successful literary tradition.
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  9. James R. Hamilton (2009). Drama. In Higgins Davies (ed.), Blackwell Companion to Aesthetics.score: 60.0
    Hamilton explains why "drama" is a category of literature rather than of theater, even though it is appropriate to describe many theatrical performances as "dramatic." Consideration of the possibilities of theatrical performance are especially important to this category of literature, but need not be (and often are not) decisive in constraining interpretations of dramatic works.
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  10. James R. Hamilton (2010). Narrative, Fiction, Imagination. In Pokorny Kotatko (ed.), Fictionality-Possibility-Reality.score: 60.0
    Hamilton argues that narratives engage our imaginations not so much by having us pretend the events they depict are true or present as by having us engage in a kind of anticipation of events to come. The idea is that the grasp of a narratively structured presentation is explained in very much the same way any sequence of events, considered as a sequence, is grasped.
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  11. Grant Hamilton (2011). On Representation: Deleuze and Coetzee on the Colonized Subject. Editions Rodopi.score: 60.0
    In this important new study, Hamilton establishes and develops innovative links between the sites of postcolonial literary theory, the fiction of the South African/Australian academic and Nobel Prize-winning writer J.M. Coetzee, and the work of the French poststructuralist philosopher Gilles Deleuze. Centering on the key postcolonial problematic of representation, Hamilton argues that if one approaches the colonial subject through Gilles Deleuze’s rewriting of subjectivity, then a transcendent configuration of the colonial subject is revealed. Importantly, it is this rendition (...)
     
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  12. James R. Hamilton (2007). Theatrical Space. Journal of Dramatic Theory and Criticism 31 (2):21-47.score: 60.0
    Hamilton shows how awareness of the uses of space -- in particular uses of space in which to stage an event of any kind -- enable spectators to pick out characters, props, and the like across performances within production runs, across production runs, and even across productions employing different scripts. The key ideas of object identification are taken both from the philosophical and the empirical literature and are treated as epistemic ideas rather than metaphysical conceptions.
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  13. James R. Hamilton (2006). Understanding Plays. In Saltz Krasner (ed.), Staging Philosophy.score: 60.0
    Hamilton argues that there is a level of understanding of theatrical performances, and narrative performances in particular (called "plays"), that does not require grasp of the large-scale aesthetic features that usually inform the structure of what is presented. This "basic understanding" is required for any spectator to go on to have a deeper understanding and, so, grounds any spectator's understanding of the larger-scale features of a performance.
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  14. Andrew Hamilton (2007). Laws of Biology, Laws of Nature: Problems and (Dis)Solutions. Philosophy Compass 2 (3):592–610.score: 30.0
    This article serves as an introduction to the laws-of-biology debate. After introducing the main issues in an introductory section, arguments for and against laws of biology are canvassed in Section 2. In Section 3, the debate is placed in wider epistemological context by engaging a group of scholars who have shifted the focus away from the question of whether there are laws of biology and toward offering good accounts of explanation(s) in the biological sciences. Section 4 introduces two relatively new (...)
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  15. Andrew Hamilton, Samir Okasha & Jay Odenbaugh, Philosophy of Biology.score: 30.0
    Philosophy of biology is a vibrant and growing field. From initial roots in the metaphysics of species (Ghiselin, Hull), questions about whether biology has laws of nature akin to those of physics (Ruse, Hull), and discussions of teleology and function (Grene 1974, Brandon 1981), the field has grown since the 1970s to include a vast range of topics. Over the last few decades, philosophy has had an important impact on biology, partly through following the model of engagement with science that (...)
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  16. William P. Bechtel & Andrew Hamilton (2007). Reduction, Integration, and the Unity of Science: Natural, Behavioral, and Social Sciences and the Humanities. In T. Kuipers (ed.), Philosophy of Science: Focal Issues (Volume 1 of the Handbook of the Philosophy of Science). Elsevier.score: 30.0
    1. A Historical Look at Unity 2. Field Guide to Modern Concepts of Reduction and Unity 3. Kitcher's Revisionist Account of Unification 4. Critics of Unity 5. Integration Instead of Unity 6. Reduction via Mechanisms 7. Case Studies in Reduction and Unification across the Disciplines.
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  17. Alastair Hamilton (2008). Heterodoxy in Early Modern Science and Religion. Edited by John Brooke and Ian Maclean. Heythrop Journal 49 (4):678–679.score: 30.0
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  18. Andy Hamilton (2009). Memory and Self-Consciousness: Immunity to Error Through Misidentification. [REVIEW] Synthese 171 (3):409 - 417.score: 30.0
    In The Blue Book, Wittgenstein defined a category of uses of “I” which he termed “I”-as-subject, contrasting them with “I”-as-object uses. The hallmark of this category is immunity to error through misidentification (IEM). This article extends Wittgenstein’s characterisation to the case of memory-judgments, discusses the significance of IEM for self-consciousness—developing the idea that having a first-person thought involves thinking about oneself in a distinctive way in which one cannot think of anyone or anything else—and refutes a common objection to the (...)
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  19. Christopher Hamilton (2008). Raimond Gaita on Saints, Love and Human Preciousness. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 11 (2):181 - 195.score: 30.0
    Raimond Gaita’s work in moral philosophy is unusual and important in focusing on the concept of sainthood. Drawing partly on the work of George Orwell, and partly on the life and work of Simone Weil, as well as on further material, I argue that Gaita’s use of this notion to help make sense of the concept of human preciousness is unconvincing, not least because he does not properly explore the figure and psychology of the saint in any detail. I relatedly (...)
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  20. Chris Hamilton (2006). Biodiversity, Biopiracy and Benefits: What Allegations of Biopiracy Tell Us About Intellectual Property. Developing World Bioethics 6 (3):158–173.score: 30.0
  21. Andrew Hamilton (2009). Toward a Mechanistic Evo Devo. In Manfred Laubichler & Jane Maienschein (eds.), Form and Function in Developmental Evolution. Cambridge University Press.score: 30.0
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  22. Andy Hamilton (1998). False Memory Syndrome and the Authority of Personal Memory-Claims: A Philosophical Perspective. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (4):283-297.score: 30.0
  23. Richard Paul Hamilton (2010). Shame and Philosophy. Res Publica 16 (4):431-439.score: 30.0
    Shame is a ubiquitous and highly intriguing feature of human experience. It can motivate but it can also paralyse. It is something which one can legitimately demand of another, but is not usually experienced as a choice. Perpetrators of atrocities can remain defiantly immune to shame while their victims are racked by it. It would be hard to understand any society or culture without understanding the characteristic occasions upon which shame is expected and where it is mitigated. Yet, one can (...)
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  24. J. Brooke Hamilton, Stephen B. Knouse & Vanessa Hill (2009). Google in China: A Manager-Friendly Heuristic Model for Resolving Cross-Cultural Ethical Conflicts. Journal of Business Ethics 86 (2):143 - 157.score: 30.0
    Management practitioners and scholars have worked diligently to identify methods for ethical decision making in international contexts. Theoretical frameworks such as Integrative Social Contracts Theory (Donaldson and Dunfee, 1994, Academy of Management Review 19, 252–284) and more recently the Global Business Citizenship Approach [Wood et al., 2006, Global Business Citizenship: A Transformative Framework for Ethics and Sustainable Capitalism. (M. E. Sharpe, Armonk, NY)] have produced innovations in practice. Despite these advances, many managers have difficulty implementing these theoretical concepts in daily (...)
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  25. A. Hamilton (1995). A New Look at Personal Identity. Philosophical Quarterly 45 (180):332-349.score: 30.0
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  26. Andy Hamilton (2003). 'Scottish Commonsense' About Memory: A Defence of Thomas Reid's Direct Knowledge Account. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 81 (2):229-245.score: 30.0
    Reid rejects the image theory --the representative or indirect realist position--that memory-judgements are inferred from or otherwise justified by a present image or introspectible state. He also rejects the trace theory , which regards memories as essentially traces in the brain. In contrast he argues for a direct knowledge account in which personal memory yields unmediated knowledge of the past. He asserts the reliability of memory, not in currently fashionable terms as a reliable belief-forming process, but more elusively as a (...)
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  27. Christopher Hamilton (1998). Kierkegaard on Truth as Subjectivity: Christianity, Ethics and Asceticism. Religious Studies 34 (1):61-79.score: 30.0
    This paper is an exploration and interpretation of Kierkegaard's account of Christian belief. I argue that Kierkegaard believed that the Christian metaphysical tradition was exhausted and hence that there could be no defence of belief in God in purely rational terms. I defend this interpretation against objections, going on to argue that Kierkegaard thought it possible to defend a post-metaphysical conception of religious belief. I argue that Kierkegaard thought that such a defence was available if we understand correctly what it (...)
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  28. Christopher Hamilton (2000). Nietzsche on Nobility and the Affirmation of Life. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 3 (2):169-193.score: 30.0
    In this paper I explore Nietzsche's thinking on the notions of nobility and the affirmation of life and I subject his reflections on these to criticism. I argue that we can find at least two understandings of these notions in Nietzsche's work which I call a 'worldly' and an 'inward' conception and I explain what I mean by each of these. Drawing on Homer and Dostoyevsky, the work of both of whom was crucial for Nietzsche in developing and exploring his (...)
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  29. Andrew Hamilton, Nathan Smith & Matthew Haber (2009). Social Insects and the Individuality Thesis: Cohesion and the Colony as a Selectable Individual. In Juergen Gadau & Jennifer Fewell (eds.), Organization of Insect Societies: From Genome to Sociocomplexity. Harvard.score: 30.0
  30. Andy Hamilton (2007). Music and the Aural Arts. British Journal of Aesthetics 47 (1):46-63.score: 30.0
    The visual arts include painting, sculpture, photography, video, and film. But many people would argue that music is the universal or only art of sound. In the modernist era, Western art music has incorporated unpitched sounds or ‘noise’, and I pursue the question of whether this process allows space for a non-musical soundart. Are there non-musical arts of sound—is there an art phonography, for instance, to parallel art photography? At the same time, I attempt a characterization of music, contrasting acoustic, (...)
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  31. Christopher Hamilton (1999). The Nature of Evil a Reply to Garrard. Philosophical Explorations 2 (2):122 – 138.score: 30.0
    In this article I explore Eve Garrard's recent account of evil and some work of Colin McGinn's on the same topic. I argue that neither provides a satisfactory account of evil. In doing so, I discuss the role of conscience, sadism and indifference to the suffering of others in evil-doing. I argue that the evil-doer can be admirable and I explore the relation between agent and action in the evil deed.The idea that evil is mysterious is considered and I conclude (...)
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  32. Andy Hamilton (2008). Intention and the Authority of Avowals. Philosophical Explorations 11 (1):23 – 37.score: 30.0
    There is a common assumption that intention is a complex behavioural disposition, or a motivational state underlying such a disposition. Associated with this position is the apparently commonsense view that an avowal of intention is a direct report of an inner motivational state, and indirectly an expression of a belief that it is likely that one will A. A central claim of this article is that the dispositional or motivational model is mistaken since it cannot acknowledge either the future-direction of (...)
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  33. Christopher Hamilton (2007). Nietzsche and the Murder of God. Religious Studies 43 (2):165-182.score: 30.0
    Nietzsche's tortured relationship to the Christian God has received scant attention from commentators. In this paper I seek to map out the central lines a proper understanding of Nietzsche in this regard might take. I argue that fundamental in such an understanding is Nietzsche's profoundly corporeal moral vocabulary, and I trace connections between this vocabulary and Nietzsche's concern with cleanliness, his asceticism, and the notion of a sense of common humanity with others.
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  34. Raymond Geuss & Lawrence Hamilton (2013). Human Rights: A Very Bad Idea. Theoria 60 (135):83-103.score: 30.0
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  35. J. Brooke Hamilton & Stephen B. Knouse (2001). Multinational Enterprise Decision Principles for Dealing with Cross Cultural Ethical Conflicts. Journal of Business Ethics 31 (1):77 - 94.score: 30.0
    Cross cultural ethical conflicts are a major challenge for managers of multinational corporations (MNEs) when an MNE''s business practices and a host country''s practices differ. We develop a set of decision principles to help MNE managers deal with these conflicts and illustrate with examples of ethical conflicts faced by MNEs doing business in contemporary Russia (DeGeorge, 1994). We discuss the generalizability of the principles by comparing them to the Donaldson (1989) and Buller and Kohls (1997) decision models. Finally we discuss (...)
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  36. Christopher Hamilton (2008). Simone Weil: An Apprenticeship in Attention – by Mario Von der Ruhr. Philosophical Investigations 31 (4):374-379.score: 30.0
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  37. Andy Hamilton (2000). The Authority of Avowals and the Concept of Belief. European Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):20-39.score: 30.0
  38. Andy Hamilton (1990). The Aesthetics of Imperfection. Philosophy 65 (253):323 - 340.score: 30.0
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  39. A. Hamilton (2000). The Art of Improvisation and the Aesthetics of Imperfection. British Journal of Aesthetics 40 (1):168-185.score: 30.0
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  40. Jay Odenbaugh, Matt Haber, Andrew Hamilton & and Samir Okasha, Philosophy of Biology.score: 30.0
    Philosophy of the Special Sciences, edited by Fritz Allhof, Blackwell Press.
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  41. Kelly Hamilton (2002). Darstellungen in The Principles of Mechanics and the Tractatus: The Representation of Objects in Relation in Hertz and Wittgenstein. Perspectives on Science 10 (1):28-68.score: 30.0
  42. Richard Paul Hamilton (2006). Love as a Contested Concept. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 36 (3):239–254.score: 30.0
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  43. Andy Hamilton (2011). Rhythm and Stasis: A Major and Almost Entirely Neglected Philosophical Problem. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 111 (1pt1):25-42.score: 30.0
    This article develops a dynamic account of rhythm as ‘order-in-movement’ that opposes static accounts of rhythm as abstract time, as essentially a pattern of possibly unstressed sounds and silences. This dynamic account is humanistic: it focuses on music as a humanly-produced, sonorous phenomenon, privileging the human as opposed to the abstract, or the organic or mechanical. It defends the claim that movement is the most fundamental conceptualization of music—the basic category in terms of which it is experienced—and suggests, against Scruton, (...)
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  44. Walton H. Hamilton (1938). The Path of Due Process of Law. Ethics 48 (3):269-296.score: 30.0
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  45. Andy Hamilton & Roger Scruton (1999). The Aesthetics of Western Art Music. Philosophical Books 40 (3):145-159.score: 30.0
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  46. Andy Hamilton (2009). Scruton's Philosophy of Culture: Elitism, Populism, and Classic Art. British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (4):389-404.score: 30.0
    Scruton is a self-confessed elitist for whom culture is ‘the creation and creator of elites’, though its meaning ‘lies in emotions and aspirations that are common to all’. This article argues that one can uphold his humane conception of the value of high culture without endorsing elitism. It develops a surprisingly unelitist strand in Scruton's thinking into a meritocratic middle way between elitism and populism, in order to explain why art is in some sense an elite product, but with communal (...)
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  47. Christopher Hamilton (2009). Enjoyment: The Moral Significance of Styles of Life. International Journal of Philosophical Studies 17 (4):611 – 616.score: 30.0
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  48. Cameron Hamilton, On the Possibility of Robots Having Emotions.score: 30.0
    I argue against the commonly held intuition that robots and virtual agents will never have emotions by contending robots can have emotions in a sense that is functionally similar to humans, even if the robots' emotions are not exactly equivalent to those of humans. To establish a foundation for assessing the robots' emotional capacities, I first define what emotions are by characterizing the components of emotion consistent across emotion theories. Second, I dissect the affective-cognitive architecture of MIT's Kismet and Leonardo, (...)
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  49. Andy Hamilton (2003). The Art of Recording and the Aesthetics of Perfection. British Journal of Aesthetics 43 (4):345-362.score: 30.0
    Recording has transformed the nature of music as an art by reconfiguring the opposition between the aesthetics of perfection and imperfection. A precursor article, ‘The Art of Improvisation and the Aesthetics of Imperfection’, contrasted the perfectionist aesthetic of the ‘work-concept’ with the imperfectionist aesthetic of improvisation. Imperfectionist approaches to recording are purist in wanting to maintain the diachronic and synchronic integrity of the performance, which perfectionist recording creatively subverts through mixing and editing. But a purist transparency thesis cannot evade the (...)
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  50. James Elser & Andrew Hamilton (2007). Stoichiometry and the New Biology: The Future Is Now. PLoS Biology 5:181-183.score: 30.0
    The world is an untidy place, and the sciences—all of them—reflect this. One source of this untidiness is the relationship between levels of organization. Reducing macrolevels to microlevels—explaining the former in terms of the latter—has met with successes but has never been the whole story. In the biological sciences, there has been much attention lately to the shortcomings of reductionism on the grounds that (i) it changes the subject rather than explaining, (ii) it leads to a myopically molecular view of (...)
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