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  1. Aasim I. Padela, Steven W. Furber, Mohammad A. Kholwadia & Ebrahim Moosa (2014). Dire Necessity and Transformation: Entry‐Points for Modern Science in Islamic Bioethical Assessment of Porcine Products in Vaccines. Bioethics 28 (2):59-66.
    The field of medicine provides an important window through which to examine the encounters between religion and science, and between modernity and tradition. While both religion and science consider health to be a ‘good’ that is to be preserved, and promoted, religious and science-based teachings may differ in their conception of what constitutes good health, and how that health is to be achieved. This paper analyzes the way the Islamic ethico-legal tradition assesses the permissibility of using vaccines that contain porcine-derived (...)
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  2. Aasim I. Padela, Aisha Y. Malik, Farr Curlin & Raymond De Vries (2014). [Re]Considering Respect for Persons in a Globalizing World. Developing World Bioethics 14 (2).
    Contemporary clinical ethics was founded on principlism, and the four principles: respect for autonomy, nonmaleficence, beneficence and justice, remain dominant in medical ethics discourse and practice. These principles are held to be expansive enough to provide the basis for the ethical practice of medicine across cultures. Although principlism remains subject to critique and revision, the four-principle model continues to be taught and applied across the world. As the practice of medicine globalizes, it remains critical to examine the extent to which (...)
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  3. Aasim I. Padela (2013). Islamic Bioethics: Between Sacred Law, Lived Experiences, and State Authority. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 34 (2):65-80.
    There is burgeoning interest in the field of “Islamic” bioethics within public and professional circles, and both healthcare practitioners and academic scholars deploy their respective expertise in attempts to cohere a discipline of inquiry that addresses the needs of contemporary bioethics stakeholders while using resources from within the Islamic ethico-legal tradition. This manuscript serves as an introduction to the present thematic issue dedicated to Islamic bioethics. Using the collection of papers as a guide the paper outlines several critical questions that (...)
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  4. Aasim I. Padela (2013). Islamic Verdicts in Health Policy Discourse: Porcine‐Based Vaccines as a Case Study. Zygon 48 (3):655-670.
    In this article, I apply a policy-oriented applied Islamic bioethics lens to two verdicts on the permissibility of using vaccines with porcine components. I begin by reviewing the decrees and then proceed to describe how they were used by health policy stakeholders. Subsequently, My analysis will highlight aspects of the verdict's ethico-legal arguments in order to illustrate salient legal concepts that must be accounted for when using Islamic verdicts as the basis for health policy. I will conclude with several suggestions (...)
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  5. Aasim I. Padela, Ahsan Arozullah & Ebrahim Moosa (2013). Brain Death in Islamic Ethico-Legal Deliberation: Challenges for Applied Islamic Bioethics. Bioethics 27 (3):132-139.
    Since the 1980s, Islamic scholars and medical experts have used the tools of Islamic law to formulate ethico-legal opinions on brain death. These assessments have varied in their determinations and remain controversial. Some juridical councils such as the Organization of Islamic Conferences' Islamic Fiqh Academy (OIC-IFA) equate brain death with cardiopulmonary death, while others such as the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences (IOMS) analogize brain death to an intermediate state between life and death. Still other councils have repudiated the notion (...)
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  6. Shoaib A. Rasheed & Aasim I. Padela (2013). The Interplay Between Religious Leaders and Organ Donation Among Muslims. Zygon 48 (3):635-654.
    Bioethics and health researchers often turn to Islamic jurisconsults (fuqahā’) and their verdicts (fatāwā) to understand how Islam and health intersect. Yet when using fatwā to promote health behavior change, researchers have often found less than ideal results. In this article we examine several health behavior change interventions that partnered with Muslim religious leaders aiming at promoting organ donation. As these efforts have generally met with limited success, we reanalyze these efforts through the lens of the theory of planned behavior, (...)
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  7. Aasim I. Padela & Pablo Rodriguez del Pozo (2011). Muslim Patients and Cross-Gender Interactions in Medicine: An Islamic Bioethical Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):40-44.
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  8. Aasim I. Padela & Pablo Rodriguez del Pozo (2011). Muslim Patients and Cross-Gender Interactions in Medicine: An Islamic Bioethical Perspective. Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (1):40-44.
    As physicians encounter an increasingly diverse patient population, socioeconomic circumstances, religious values and cultural practices may present barriers to the delivery of quality care. Increasing cultural competence is often cited as a way to reduce healthcare disparities arising from value and cultural differences between patients and providers. Cultural competence entails not only a knowledge base of cultural practices of disparate patient populations, but also an attitude of adapting one's practice style to meet patient needs and values. Gender roles, relationship dynamics (...)
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  9. Aasim I. Padela, Hasan Shanawani, Jane Greenlaw, Hamada Hamid, Mehmet Aktas & Nancy Chin (2008). The Perceived Role of Islam in Immigrant Muslim Medical Practice Within the USA: An Exploratory Qualitative Study. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (5):365-369.
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  10. Aasim I. Padela (2007). Islamic Medical Ethics: A Primer. Bioethics 21 (3):169–178.