Search results for 'Abhidharma' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Birgit Kellner (2014). Changing Frames in Buddhist Thought: The Concept of Ākāra in Abhidharma and in Buddhist Epistemological Analysis. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (2-3):275-295.score: 18.0
    It has been argued that the use of the concept of ākāra—a mental “form,” “appearance” or “aspect”—in Buddhist epistemological analysis or pramāṇa exhibits continuities with earlier Buddhist thinking about mental processes, in particular in Abhidharma. A detailed inquiry into uses of the term ākāra in pertinent contexts in Vasubandhu’s Abhidharmakośabhāṣya brings to light different semantic nuances and functions of this term. The characteristic use of ākāra in Buddhist epistemological discourse turns out to be continuous with only some of the (...)
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  2. Herbert V. Guenther (1976). Philosophy and Psychology in the Abhidharma. Distributed by Random House.score: 15.0
     
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  3. Karl H. Potter (1970). Abhidharma Buddhism to 150 A.D. In , The Encyclopedia of Indian Philosophies. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 15.0
     
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  4. Mattia Salvini (forthcoming). Dependent Arising, Non-Arising, and the Mind: MMK1 and the Abhidharma. Journal of Indian Philosophy:1-27.score: 15.0
    The first Chapter of Nāgārjuna’s Mūlamadhyamakakārikā offers a critique of causation that includes the Abhidharmic category of the ‘four conditions’. Following the South-Asian commentarial tradition, this article discusses the precise relationship between Madhyamaka philosophy and its fundamental Abhidharmic background. What comes to light is a more precise assessment of Madhyamaka ideas about viable conventions, understood as the process of dependent arising. Since this is primarily in the sense of conceptual dependence, it involves sentiency as a necessary causal element, and the (...)
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  5. Braj M. Sinha (1983). Time and Temporality in Sāṁkhya-Yoga and Abhidharma Buddhism. Munshiram Manoharlal.score: 15.0
     
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  6. Richard King (1998). Vij Aptim Trat and the Abhidharma Context of Rarly Yog C Ra. Asian Philosophy 8 (1):5 – 17.score: 12.0
    Contemporary accounts of early Mah y na Buddhist schools like the Madhyamaka and the Yog c ra tend to portray them as generally antithetical to the Abhidharma of non-Mah y na schools such as the Therav da and the Sarv stiv da. This paper attempts to locate early Yog c ra philosophical speculation firmly within the broader context of Abhidharma debates. Certain key Yog c ra concepts such as layavij na, vij apti-m trat and citta-m tra are discussed (...)
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  7. Monima Chadha (forthcoming). Time-Series of Ephemeral Impressions: The Abhidharma-Buddhist View of Conscious Experience. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences:1-18.score: 12.0
    In the absence of continuing selves or persons, Buddhist philosophers are under pressure to provide a systematic account of phenomenological and other features of conscious experience. Any such Buddhist account of experience, however, faces further problems because of another cardinal tenet of Buddhist revisionary metaphysics: the doctrine of impermanence, which during the Abhidharma period is transformed into the doctrine of momentariness. Setting aside the problems that plague the Buddhist Abhidharma theory of experience because of lack of persons, I (...)
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  8. Paul M. Williams (1981). On the Abhidharma Ontology. Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (3):227-257.score: 9.0
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  9. Collett Cox (2004). From Category To Ontology: The Changing Role Of Dharma In Sarvāstivāda Abhidharma. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 32 (5-6):543-597.score: 9.0
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  10. Erich Frauwallner (1995). Studies in Abhidharma Literature and the Origins of Buddhist Philosophical Systems. State University of New York.score: 9.0
    "This is a translation of Frauwallner's Abhidharmastudien.
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  11. Noa Ronkin (forthcoming). Abhidharma. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 9.0
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  12. Shoryu Katsura (2003). Some Cases of Doctrinal Proofs in the Abhidharma-Kośa-BhāSya. Journal of Indian Philosophy 31 (1/3):105-120.score: 9.0
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  13. Bart Dessein (1999). Self, Dependent Origination and Action in Bactrian and Gandharan Sarvastivada Abhidharma Texts. Communication and Cognition 32 (1-2):53-83.score: 9.0
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  14. David A. Dilworth (1978). Whitehead's Process Realism, the Abhidharma Dharma Theory, and the Mahayana Critique. International Philosophical Quarterly 18 (2):151-169.score: 9.0
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  15. Karl H. Potter [ (1970). Abhidharma Buddhism to 150 A.D. In Karl H. Potter (ed.), The Encyclopedia of Indian Philosophies. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 9.0
     
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  16. Masako Odagawa (1976). A. Hirakawa: "Zeitlehre Im Urbuddhismus Und Abhidharma". Perspektiven der Philosophie 2:363-368.score: 9.0
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  17. Katsura Shoryu (2003). Some Cases of Doctrinal Proofs in the Abhidharma-Kosa-Bhasya. Journal of Indian Philosophy 31:105-120.score: 9.0
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  18. Weishan (2011). Shuo Yi Qie You Bu Zhi Chan Ding Lun Yan Jiu: Yi Fan Wen "Ju She Lun" Ji Qi Fan Han Zhu Shi Wei Ji Chu = Dhyāna-Samāpatti in Sarvāstivāda Abhidharma. Zhongguo Ren Min da Xue Chu Ban She.score: 9.0
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  19. Noa Ronkin (2005). Early Buddhist Metaphysics: The Making of a Philosophical Tradition. London ; New Yorkroutledgecurzon.score: 6.0
    Early Buddhist Metaphysics provides a philosophical account of the major doctrinal shift in the history of early Theravada tradition in India: the transition from the earliest stratum of Buddhist thought to the systematic and allegedly scholastic philosophy of the Pali Abhidhamma movement. Entwining comparative philosophy and Buddhology, the author probes the Abhidhamma's metaphysical transition in terms of the Aristotelian tradition and vis-à-vis modern philosophy, exploits Western philosophical literature from Plato to contemporary texts in the fields of philosophy of mind and (...)
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  20. Peter Jilks (2008). Review of Mark Siderits, Buddhism as Philosophy. [REVIEW] Sophia 47 (1):79-82.score: 6.0
    Siderits’ book is a welcome contribution to the ongoing dialogue between Buddhism and Western analytic philosophy. It covers the three main areas of philosophical enquiry—metaphysics, ethics and epistemology. Although conceptually quite challenging in places, the information is always presented in a pedagogic, evolutionary and highly readable manner. There are occasional problems with Siderits’ approach of isolating Buddhism as philosophy from Buddhism as religion, particularly in his chapter on ethics, which cannot avoid being somewhat unbalanced, and possibly misrepresentational, as it skirts (...)
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  21. Vincent Eltschinger (2014). The Four Nobles' Truths and Their 16 Aspects: On the Dogmatic and Soteriological Presuppositions of the Buddhist Epistemologists' Views on Niścaya. [REVIEW] Journal of Indian Philosophy 42 (2-3):249-273.score: 6.0
    Most Buddhists would admit that every Buddhist practice and theoretical construct can be traced to or at least subsumed under one or more among the four nobles’ truths. It is hardly surprising, then, that listening to these truths and pondering upon them were considered the cornerstones of the Buddhist soteric endeavour. Learning them from a competent teacher and subjecting them to rational analysis are generally regarded as taking place at the very beginning of the religious career or, to put it (...)
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  22. N. K. Bhagwat (1929). The Budhistic [Sic] Philosophy of the Theravada School, as Embodied in the Pali Abhidhamma. Patna, Patna University.score: 6.0
     
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  23. Christian Coseru (2013). Reason and Experience in Buddhist Epistemology. In Steven Emmanuel (ed.), A Companion to Buddhist Philosophy. Wiley-Blackwell.score: 6.0
    As a specific domain of inquiry, “Buddhist epistemology” (sometimes designated in the specialist literature by the Sanskrit neologism pramāṇavāda, or the “theory of reliable sources of knowledge”) stands primarily for the dialogical-disputational context in which Buddhists advance their empirical claims to knowledge and articulate the principles of reason on the basis of which such claims may be defended. The main questions pursued in this article concern the tension between the notion that knowledge is ultimately a matter of direct experience---which the (...)
     
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  24. C. L. A. De Silva (1937/1988). A Treatise on Buddhist Philosophy, or, Abhidhamma. Sri Satguru Publications.score: 6.0
     
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  25. Eli Franco (2004). The Spitzer Manuscript: The Oldest Philosophical Manuscript in Sanskrit. Verlag Der Österreichischen Akademie Der Wissenschaften.score: 6.0
     
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  26. Anagarika Brahmacari Govinda (1974). The Psychological Attitude of Early Buddhist Philosophy and its Systematic Representation According to Abhidhamma Tradition. S. Weiser.score: 6.0
     
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  27. Aruna Haldar (1981). Some Psychological Aspects of Early Buddhist Philosophy Based on Abhidharmakośa of Vasubandhu. Asiatic Society.score: 6.0
     
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  28. Jagadīśa Kāśyapa (ed.) (1982). The Abhidhamma Philosophy, or, the Psycho-Ethical Philosophy of Early Buddhism. Bharatiya Vidya Prakashan.score: 6.0
     
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  29. Chandra B. Varma (1992). A Concise Encyclopedia of Early Buddhist Philosophy: Based on the Study of the Abhidhammatthasaṅgahasarūpa. Eastern Book Linkers.score: 6.0
     
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  30. Fumimaro Watanabe (1983). Philosophy and its Development in the Nikāyas and Abhidhamma. Motilal Banarsidass.score: 6.0
  31. Matthew MacKenzie (2010). Enacting the Self: Buddhist and Enactivist Approaches to the Emergence of the Self. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 9 (1):75-99.score: 3.0
    In this paper, I take up the problem of the self through bringing together the insights, while correcting some of the shortcomings, of Indo–Tibetan Buddhist and enactivist accounts of the self. I begin with an examination of the Buddhist theory of non-self ( anātman ) and the rigorously reductionist interpretation of this doctrine developed by the Abhidharma school of Buddhism. After discussing some of the fundamental problems for Buddhist reductionism, I turn to the enactive approach to philosophy of mind (...)
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  32. Mark Siderits (1997). Buddhist Reductionism. Philosophy East and West 47 (4):455-478.score: 3.0
    While Derek Parfit is aware that his reductionism about persons is anticipated in early Buddhism and Abhidharma, he has not explored that tradition for any clues it might yield concerning the consequences of adopting the position. In this essay, the tradition is used to construct a taxonomy of possible views about persons, and then examine the meta-physical commitments that Buddhist reductionists claim are entailed by their view. While these turn out to be significant, it is argued here that this (...)
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  33. Eunsu Cho (2004). From Buddha's Speech to Buddha's Essence: Philosophical Discussions of Buddha-Vacana in India and China. Asian Philosophy 14 (3):255 – 276.score: 3.0
    This is a comparative study of the discourses on the nature of sacred language found in Indian Abhidharma texts and those written by 7th century Chinese Buddhist scholars who, unlike the Indian Buddhists, questioned 'the essence of the Buddha's teaching'. This issue labeled fo-chiao t'i lun, the theory of 'the essence of the Buddha's teaching', was one of the topics on which Chinese Yogācāra scholars have shown a keen interest and served as the inspiration for extensive intellectual dialogues in (...)
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  34. Oliver Leaman (ed.) (2001). Encyclopedia of Asian Philosophy. Routledge.score: 3.0
    From Abhidharma to Zurvan, this important new resource identifies and defines the principal concepts and individuals in Asian philosophy throughout the world. The comprehensive geographic coverage encompasses China, Japan, India, the Middle East, the United States and Australasia, with an emphasis on contemporary developments and movements. Featuring 650 signed A-Z entries, the Encyclopedia emphasises the present-day vitality of Asian philosophy, and provides extensive coverage of trends such as the reciprocal exchange of theories between East and West, and new schools (...)
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  35. David Bastow (1995). The First Argument for Sarv Stiv Da. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):109 – 125.score: 3.0
    Abstract Philosophers belonging to the Buddhist school of Sarv?stiv?da believed in the real existence of past and future dharmas. This paper explores the implications, soteriological and philosophical, of an argument for this belief presented at the beginning of an early abhidharma text. The argument is two?fold: that past states of mind can be directly perceived; and that the temporal and causal context of these states of mind, including their karmic future and the possibility of an alternative saving future, can (...)
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  36. John Dunne (2011). Toward an Understanding of Non-Dual Mindfulness. Contemporary Buddhism 12 (1):71--88.score: 3.0
    The aim of this article is to explore an approach to ?mindfulness? that lies outside of the usual Buddhist mainstream. This approach adopts a ?non-dual? stance to meditation practice, and based on my limited experience and training in Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction, this non-dual notion of ?mindfulness? seems an especially appropriate point of comparison between Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction and Buddhism. That comparison itself will not be the focus here?given my own inexpertise and lack of clinical experience, it would be (...)
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  37. Charles Goodman (2005). Vaibhāsika Metaphoricalism. Philosophy East and West 55 (3):377-393.score: 3.0
    : Scholars have proposed several different interpretations of the doctrine of no-self found in the Buddhist Abhidharma literature. It is argued here that two of these, Constitutive Reductionism and Eliminativism, are ruled out by textual evidence. A third, the Eliminative Reductionism of Siderits, is much closer to the intent of the texts.We can refine it further by attending to the role of metaphor in Vaibhāsika accounts of the no-self doctrine. If we update this view by drawing on analytic philosophy, (...)
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  38. Cyrus Panjvani (2013). Buddhism: A Philosophical Approach. Broadview Press.score: 3.0
    This book philosophically introduces the basic truths, doctrines, and principles of Buddhism. Its goal is to explain the teachings of the Buddha and of Buddhism clearly and consistently. Though the book treads beyond the Buddha's life, into the Abhidharma and Mahayana traditions, it remains throughout a philosophical discussion and elaboration of the Buddha's thought. It is meant to be an accessible guide for those who have no background in Buddhism, and to be beneficial to the philosophical understanding of those (...)
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  39. David Scott (1995). Buddhist Functionalism—Instrumentality Reaffirmed. Asian Philosophy 5 (2):127 – 149.score: 3.0
    Abstract This article seeks to determine if Buddhism can best be understood as primarily a functionalist tradition. In pursuing this, some analogies arise with various Western strands?particularly James? ?pragmatism?, Dewey's ?instrumentalism?, Braithwaite's ?empiricism?, Wittgenstein's ?language games?, and process thinkers like Hartshorne and Jacobson. Within the Buddhist setting, the traditional Therav?da framework of sila (ethics/precepts), sam?dhi (meditation) and pañña (wisdom) are examined, together with Therav?da rituals. Despite some ?correspondence? approaches with regard to truth claim statements, e.g. vipassan? ?insight? and Abhidharma (...)
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