Search results for 'Abortion' (try it on Scholar)

1000+ found
Sort by:
See also:
Bibliography: Abortion in Applied Ethics
  1. Deregulating Abortion (1994). Section A: Abortion. In Alison M. Jaggar (ed.), Living with Contradictions: Controversies in Feminist Social Ethics. Westview Press. 272.score: 180.0
    No categories
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Philippa Foot (1967). The Problem of Abortion and the Doctrine of Double Effect. Oxford Review 5:5-15.score: 24.0
    One of the reasons why most of us feel puzzled about the problem of abortion is that we want, and do not want, to allow to the unborn child the rights that belong to adults and children. When we think of a baby about to be born it seems absurd to think that the next few minutes or even hours could make so radical a difference to its status; yet as we go back in the life of the fetus (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Margaret Olivia Little (1999). Abortion, Intimacy, and the Duty to Gestate. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 2 (3):295-312.score: 24.0
    In this article, I urge that mainstream discussions of abortion are dissatisfying in large part because they proceed in polite abstraction from the distinctive circumstances and meanings of gestation. Such discussions, in fact, apply to abortion conceptual tools that were designed on the premiss that people are physically demarcated, even as gestation is marked by a thorough-going intertwinement. We cannot fully appreciate what is normatively at stake with legally forcing continued gestation, or again how to discuss moral responsibilities (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  4. C. Strong (2008). A Critique of “the Best Secular Argument Against Abortion”. Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (10):727-731.score: 24.0
    Don Marquis has put forward a non-religious argument against abortion based on what he claims is a morally relevant similarity between killing adult human beings and killing fetuses. He asserts that killing adults is wrong because it deprives them of their valuable futures. He points out that a fetus’s future includes everything that is in an adult’s future, given that fetuses naturally develop into adults. Thus, according to Marquis, killing a fetus deprives it of the same sort of valuable (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  5. R. Jo Kornegay (2011). Hursthouse's Virtue Ethics and Abortion: Abortion Ethics Without Metaphysics? [REVIEW] Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (1):51-71.score: 24.0
    This essay explicates and evaluates the roles that fetal metaphysics and moral status play in Rosalind Hursthouse’s abortion ethics. It is motivated by Hursthouse’s puzzling claim in her widely anthologized paper Virtue Ethics and Abortion that fetal moral status and (by implication) its underlying metaphysics are in a way, fundamentally irrelevant to her position. The essay clarifies the roles that fetal ontology and moral status do in fact play in her abortion ethics. To this end, it presents (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Lara Denis (2007). Abortion and Kant's Formula of Universal Law. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 37 (4):547-580.score: 24.0
    The formula of universal law (FUL) is a natural starting point for philosophers interested in a Kantian perspective on the morality of abortion. I argue, however, that FUL does not yield much in the way of promising or substantive conclusions regarding the morality of abortion. I first reveal how two philosophers' (Hare's and Gensler's) attempts to use Kantian considerations of universality and prescriptivity fail to provide analyses of abortion that are either compelling or true to Kant=s understanding (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Lara Denis (2008). Animality and Agency: A Kantian Approach to Abortion. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (1):117-37.score: 24.0
    This paper situates abortion in the context of women’s duties to themselves. I argue that Kant’s fundamental moral requirement (found in the formula of humanity) to respect oneself as a rational being, combined with Kant’s view of our animal nature, form the basis for a view of pregnancy and abortion that focuses on women’s agency and moral character without diminishing the importance of their bodies and emotions. The Kantian view of abortion that emerges takes abortion to (...)
    Direct download (9 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. F. M. Kamm (1992). Creation and Abortion: A Study in Moral and Legal Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Based on a non-consequentialist ethical theory, this book critically examines the prevalent view that if a fetus has the moral standing of a person, it has a right to life and abortion is impermissible. Most discussion of abortion has assumed that this view is correct, and so has focused on the question of the personhood of the fetus. Kamm begins by considering in detail the permissibility of killing in non-abortion cases which are similar to abortion cases. (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Laurie Shrage (1994). Moral Dilemmas of Feminism: Prostitution, Adultery, and Abortion. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Sharge explores the moral pemises of feminist sexual politics, focusing in particular on the emotive issues of abortion, prostitution and adultery, in order to develop an interpretative and pluralist approach to feminist ethics.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Christopher Robert Kaczor (2010). The Ethics of Abortion: Women's Rights, Human Life, and the Question of Justice. Routledge.score: 24.0
    Appealing to reason rather than religious belief, this book is the most comprehensive case against the choice of abortion yet published.
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  11. A. Giubilini & F. Minerva (2013). After-Birth Abortion: Why Should the Baby Live? Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):261-263.score: 24.0
    Abortion is largely accepted even for reasons that do not have anything to do with the fetus' health. By showing that (1) both fetuses and newborns do not have the same moral status as actual persons, (2) the fact that both are potential persons is morally irrelevant and (3) adoption is not always in the best interest of actual people, the authors argue that what we call ‘after-birth abortion’ (killing a newborn) should be permissible in all the cases (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  12. Elizabeth Harman (2007). How is the Ethics of Stem Cell Research Different From the Ethics of Abortion? Metaphilosophy 38 (2-3):207–225.score: 24.0
    It seems that if abortion is permissible, then stem cell research must be as well: it involves the death of a less significant thing (an embryo rather than a fetus) for a greater good (lives saved rather than nine months of physical imposition avoided). However, I argue in this essay that this natural thought is mistaken. In particular, on the assumption that embryos and fetuses have the full moral status of persons, abortion is permissible but one form of (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  13. Mathew Lu (2011). Abortion and Virtue Ethics. In Stephen Napier (ed.), Persons, Moral Worth, and Embryos: A Critical Analysis of Pro-Choice Arguments. Springer.score: 24.0
    In this paper I discuss what contemporary virtue ethics can say about abortion by considering both what has been said and what we may further argue from a virtue-focused perspective. I begin by comparing virtue ethics to the two other dominant approaches in normative ethics and then consider what some important virtue ethicists have said about abortion, especially Rosalind Hursthouse. After recognizing the many contributions her analysis offers, I also note some of the deficiencies in her approach, particularly (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  14. Evangelos Protopapadakis (2012). A Cool Hand on My Feverish Forehead: An Even Better Samaritan and the Ethics of Abortion. Philosophy Study 2 (2):115-123.score: 24.0
    The debate concerning abortion abounds in miraculous narratives. Judith Jarvis Thomson has contrived the most celebrated set among related ones, to wit the “violinist analogy,” the “Good Samaritan” narrative, and the “Henry Fonda” allegory, by virtue of which, she intends, on the one hand, to argue that women’s right to autonomy outweighs the alleged fetus’s right to life, and on the other, to prove that no positive moral duties can be derived towards other persons alone from the fact that (...)
    Translate to English
    | Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  15. David A. Jensen (2008). Abortion, Embryonic Stem Cell Research, and Waste. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 29 (1):27-41.score: 24.0
    Can one consistently deny the permissibility of abortion while endorsing the killing of human embryos for the sake of stem cell research? The question is not trivial; for even if one accepts that abortion is prima facie wrong in all cases, there are significant differences with many of the embryos used for stem cell research from those involved in abortion—most prominently, many have been abandoned in vitro, and appear to have no reasonably likely meaningful future. On these (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  16. Bernard Gert (2010). Moral Disagreement Concerning Abortion. Diametros 26:23-43.score: 24.0
    I use the example of abortion to show that there are some unresolvable moral disagreements. I list four sources of unresolvable moral disagreement: 1) differences in the rankings of the basic evils of death, pain, disability, loss of freedom, and loss of pleasure, 2) differences in the interpretation of moral rules, 3) ideological differences in the view of human nature and human societies, and 4) differences concerning who is impartially protected by the moral rules. It is this last difference (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  17. Ezio Di Nucci (2009). On How to Interpret the Role of the Future Within the Abortion Debate. Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (10):651-652.score: 24.0
    In a previous paper, I had argued that Strong’s counterexamples to Marquis’s argument against abortion—according to which terminating fetuses is wrong because it deprives them of a valuable future—fail either because they have no bearing on Marquis’s argument or because they make unacceptable claims about what constitutes a valuable future. In this paper I respond to Strong’s criticism of my argument according to which I fail to acknowledge that Marquis uses "future like ours" and "valuable future" interchangeably. I show (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  18. Chris Kaposy (2012). Two Stalemates in the Philosophical Debate About Abortion and Why They Cannot Be Resolved Using Analogical Arguments. Bioethics 26 (2):84-92.score: 24.0
    Philosophical debate about the ethics of abortion has reached stalemate on two key issues. First, the claim that foetuses have moral standing that entitles them to protections for their lives has been neither convincingly established nor refuted. Second, the question of a pregnant woman's obligation to allow the gestating foetus the use of her body has not been resolved. Both issues are deadlocked because philosophers addressing them invariably rely on intuitions and analogies, and such arguments have weaknesses that make (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  19. E. Christian Brugger (2012). The Problem of Fetal Pain and Abortion: Toward an Ethical Consensus for Appropriate Behavior. Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 22 (3):263-287.score: 24.0
    This essay concerns what people should do in conflict situations when a doubt of fact bears on settling whether an alternative under consideration is legitimate or not. Its principal audience are those who believe that abortion can be legitimate when not having an abortion gives rise to serious harms that can be avoided by having one, but who are concerned that fetuses might feel pain when being aborted, and who believe that causing unnecessary pain should be avoided when (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  20. Alan Clune (2011). Deeper Problems for Noonan's Probability Argument Against Abortion: On a Charitable Reading of Noonan's Conception Criterion of Humanity. Bioethics 25 (5):280-289.score: 24.0
    In ‘An Almost Absolute Value in History’ John T. Noonan criticizes several attempts to provide a criterion for when an entity deserves rights. These criteria, he argues are either arbitrary or lead to absurd consequence. Noonan proposes human conception as the criterion of rights, and justifies it by appeal to the sharp shift in probability, at conception, of becoming a being possessed of human reason. Conception, then, is when abortion becomes immoral.The article has an historical and a philosophical goal. (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  21. F. M. Kamm (2001). Ronald Dworkin on Abortion and Assisted Suicide. Journal of Ethics 5 (3):221-240.score: 24.0
    In the first part of this article, I raisequestions about Dworkin''s theory of theintrinsic value of life and about the adequacyof his proposal to understand abortion in termsof different ways of valuing life. In thesecond part of the article, I consider hisargument in ``The Philosophers'' Brief on AssistedSuicide'''', which claims that the distinctionbetween killing and letting die is morallyirrelevant, the distinction between intendingand foreseeing death can be morally relevantbut is not always so. I argue that thekilling/letting die distinction can (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  22. S. Matthew Liao (2007). Time-Relative Interests and Abortion. Journal of Moral Philosophy 4 (2):242-256.score: 24.0
    The concept of a time-relative interest is introduced by Jeff McMahan to solve certain puzzles about the badness of death. Some people (e.g. McMahan and David DeGrazia) believe that this concept can also be used to show that abortion is permissible. In this paper, I first argue that if the Time-Relative Interest Account permits abortion, then it would also permit infanticide.
    Direct download (10 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  23. David Shaw (2011). Justice and the Fetus: Rawls, Children and Abortion. Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 20 (1):93-101.score: 24.0
    In a footnote to the first edition of Political Liberalism, John Rawls introduced an example of how public reason could deal with controversial issues. He intended this example to show that his system of political liberalism could deal with such problems by considering only political values, without the introduction of comprehensive moral doctrines. Unfortunately, Rawls chose “the troubled question of abortion” as the issue that would illustrate this. In the case of abortion, Rawls argued, “the equality of women (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  24. Peter Nichols (2012). Abortion, Time-Relative Interests, and Futures Like Ours. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 15 (4):493-506.score: 24.0
    Don Marquis ( 1989 ) has argued most abortions are immoral, for the same reason that killing you or me is immoral: abortion deprives the fetus of a valuable future (FLO). Call this account the FLOA. A rival account is Jeff McMahan’s ( 2002 ), time-relative interest account (TRIA) of the wrongness of killing. According to this account, an act of killing is wrong to the extent that it deprives the victim of future value and the relation of psychological (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  25. Jeremy Williams (2010). Wrongful Life and Abortion. Res Publica 16 (4):351-366.score: 24.0
    According to theories of wrongful life (WL), the imposition upon a child of an existence of poor quality can constitute an act of harming, and a violation of the child’s rights. The idea that there can be WLs may seem intuitively compelling. But, as this paper argues, liberals who commit themselves to WL theories may have to compromise some of their other beliefs. For they will thereby become committed to the claim that some women are under a stringent moral duty (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  26. Robert Audi (1997). Preventing Abortion as a Test Case for the Justifiability of Violence. Journal of Ethics 1 (2):141-163.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the rationale for violence and coercion aimed at preventing abortion conceived as the killing of an innocent person. Some important arguments for personhood at conception are examined, and in the light of the examination the paper considers whether they warrant concluding that a free and democratic society should pass laws recognizing personhood at conception. The wider concern is what principles such a society should use as a basis for legal coercion and what principles conscientious individuals should (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  27. Regina A. Rini (2013). Of Course the Baby Should Live: Against 'After-Birth Abortion'. Journal of Medical Ethics 39 (5):353-356.score: 24.0
    In a recent paper, Giubilini and Minerva argue for the moral permissibility of what they call ‘after-birth abortion’, or infanticide. Here I suggest that they actually employ a confusion of two distinct arguments: one relying on the purportedly identical moral status of a fetus and a newborn, and the second giving an independent argument for the denial of moral personhood to infants (independent of whatever one might say about fetuses). After distinguishing these arguments, I suggest that neither one is (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  28. E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews (2010). Post-Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction. Bioethics 24 (9):445-452.score: 24.0
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  29. Simo Vehmas (2002). Parental Responsibility and the Morality of Selective Abortion. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 5 (4):463-484.score: 24.0
    It is now a common opinion in Western countries that a child's impairment would probably place an unexpected burden on her parents, a burden that the parents have not committed themselves to dealing with. Therefore, selective abortion is in general a morally justified option for the parents. I argue that this view is based on biased information about the quality of life of individuals with impairments and their families. Also, a conscious decision to procreate should bring about conscious assent (...)
    Direct download (8 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  30. Scott Woodcock (2011). Abortion Counselling and the Informed Consent Dilemma. Bioethics 25 (9):495-504.score: 24.0
    An obstacle to abortion exists in the form of abortion ‘counselling’ that discourages women from terminating their pregnancies. This counselling involves providing information about the procedure that tends to create feelings of guilt, anxiety and strong emotional reactions to the recognizable form of a human fetus. Instances of such counselling that involve false or misleading information are clearly unethical and do not prompt much philosophical reflection, but the prospect of truthful abortion counselling draws attention to a delicate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  31. Farrokh B. Sekaleshfar (2009). Reinterpreting the 'Quickening' Perspective in the Abortion Debate. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 30 (2):161-171.score: 24.0
    Personhood constitutes the pivotal point in the abortion debate. There exists a diversity of views as to when foetal personhood actually starts—from conception and implantation to viability and even birth. One perspective that has lost support for decades is that of quickening, a stance associated with Lord Ellenborough’s 1803 Act. This paper attempts to put quickening back into the limelight, albeit through a new interpretation. After discussing its philosophy and underpinning rationale, I will assess a number of arguments that (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  32. Elliott Louis Bedford (2012). Abortion: At the Still Point of the Turning Conscientious Objection Debate. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 24 (2):63-82.score: 24.0
    Abortion is the central issue in the conscientious objection debate. In this article I demonstrate why this is so for two philosophical viewpoints prominent in American culture. One, represented by Patrick Lee and Robert P. George, holds that the fundamental moral value of being human can be found in bare life and the other, represented by Tom Beauchamp and James Childress, holds that this fundamental value is found in the life that can choose and determine itself. First, I articulate (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  33. Jan Deckers (2010). The Right to Life and Abortion Legislation in England and Wales: A Proposal for Change. Diametros 26:1-22.score: 24.0
    In England and Wales, there is significant controversy on the law related to abortion. Recent discussions have focussed predominantly on the health professional's right to conscientious objection. This article argues for a comprehensive overhaul of the law from the perspective of an author who adopts the view that all unborn human beings should be granted the prima facie right to life. It is argued that, should the law be modified in accordance with this stance, it need not imply that (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  34. Kate Gleeson (2009). The Other Abortion Myth—the Failure of the Common Law. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (1):69-81.score: 24.0
    The 2006 trial of Suman Sood put criminal abortion on the public agenda for the first time in 25 years in NSW. Response to the case highlights tenacious myths about abortion law in Australia; namely that the common law “is an ass” that allows for abortion only by way of a lack of application of the law. By briefly explaining the history of abortion in Australia, I argue that the Sood case does not represent a general (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  35. Pedro Galvão (2007). Boonin on the Future-Like-Ours Argument Against Abortion. Bioethics 21 (6):324–328.score: 24.0
    I argue that David Boonin has failed in his attempt to undermine Donald Marquis's future-like-ours argument against abortion. I show that the ethical principle advanced by Boonin in his critique to that argument is unable, contrary to what he claims, to account for the wrongness of infanticide. Then I argue that Boonin's critique misrepresents Marquis's argument. Although there is a way to restate his critique in order to avoid the misrepresentation, the success of such restatement is precluded by the (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  36. Helga Varden (2012). A Feminist, Kantian Conception of the Right to Bodily Integrity: The Cases of Abortion and Homosexuality. In Sharon Crasnow & Anita Superson (eds.), Out of the Shadows: Analytical Feminist Contributions to Traditional Philosophy. Oxford University Press.score: 24.0
    Pregnant women and persons engaging in homosexual practices compose two groups that have been and still are amongst those most severely subjected to coercive restrictions regarding their own bodies. From an historical point of view, it is a recent and rare phenomenon that a woman’s right to abortion and a person’s right to engage in homosexual interactions are recognized. Although most Western liberal states currently do recognize these rights, they are under continuous assault from various political and religious movements. (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  37. Y. Michael Barilan & Moshe Weintraub (2001). Pantagruelism: A Rabelaisian Inspiration for Understanding Poisoning, Euthanasia and Abortion in the Hippocratic Oath and in Contemporary Clinical Practice. Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 22 (3):269-286.score: 24.0
    Contrary to the common view, this paper suggests that the Hippocratic oath does not directly refer to the controversial subjects of euthanasia and abortion. We interpret the oath in the context of establishing trust in medicine through departure from Pantagruelism. Pantagruelism is coined after Rabelais' classic novel Gargantua and Pantagruel. His satire about a wonder herb, Pantagruelion, is actually a sophisticated model of anti-medicine in which absence of independent moral values and of properly conducted research fashion a flagrant over-medicalization (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  38. Cheryl E. Abbate (2014). Adventures in Moral Consistency: How to Develop an Abortion Ethic Through an Animal Rights Framework. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-20.score: 24.0
    In recent discussions, it has been argued that a theory of animal rights is at odds with a liberal abortion policy. In response, Francione (1995) argues that the principles used in the animal rights discourse do not have implications for the abortion debate. I challenge Francione’s conclusion by illustrating that his own framework of animal rights, supplemented by a relational account of moral obligation, can address the moral issue of abortion. I first demonstrate that Francione’s animal rights (...)
    Direct download (2 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  39. John Martin Fischer (2013). Abortion and Ownership. Journal of Ethics 17 (4):275-304.score: 24.0
    I explore two thought-experiments in Judith Jarvis Thomson’s important article, “A Defense of Abortion”: the violinist example and the people-seeds example. I argue (contra Thomson) that you have a moral duty not to unplug yourself from the violinist and also a moral duty not to destroy a people-seed that has landed in your sofa. Nevertheless, I also argue that there are crucial differences between the thought-experiments and the contexts of pregnancy due to rape or to contraceptive failure. In virtue (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  40. Mathew Lu (2013). Aristotle on Abortion and Infanticide. International Philosophical Quarterly 53 (1):47-62.score: 24.0
    Some recent commentators have thought that, if updated with the findings of modern embryology, Aristotle’s views on abortion would yield a pro-life conclusion. On the basis of a careful reading of the relevant passage from Politics VII, I argue that the matter is more complicated than simply replacing his defective empirical embryological claims with our more accurate ones. Since Aristotle’s view on abortion was shaped not only by a defective embryology but also by an acceptance of the classical (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  41. S. S. Coleman (2013). Direct and Indirect Abortion in the Roman Catholic Tradition: A Review of the Phoenix Case. [REVIEW] HEC Forum 25 (2):127-143.score: 24.0
    In Roman Catholic Moral Theology, a direct abortion is never permitted. An indirect abortion, in which a life threatening pathology is treated, and the treatment inadvertently leads to the death of the fetus, may be permissible in proportionately grave situations. In situations in which a mother’s life is endangered by the pregnancy before the fetus is viable, there is some debate about whether the termination of the pregnancy is a direct or indirect abortion. In this essay a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  42. Dennis Cooley & Irina Chesnokova (2011). Sex Selection Abortion in Kazakhstan: Understanding a Cultural Justification. Developing World Bioethics 11 (3):154-160.score: 24.0
    The topic of abortion has been extensively researched, and the research has produced a large number of arguments and discussions. Missing in the literature, however, are discussions of practices in some areas of the Developing or Third World. In this paper, we examine the morality of sex selection abortions in Kazakhstan's Kazakh culture, and argue that such abortions can be ethically justified based, in part, on the unique perspectives of Kazakh culture.
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  43. Demian Whiting (2011). Abortion and Referrals for Abortion: Is the Law in Need of Change? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 17 (5):1006-1008.score: 24.0
    In an article published recently in this journal Daniel Hill argues that it is unacceptable that British law allows doctors to refuse to terminate non-emergency pregnancies but not to refuse to refer given that many doctors who are opposed to non-emergency abortion will be opposed also to any action that aids non-emergency abortion, including the action of referral. In this reply, I argue that Hill’s argument fails to describe properly the correct function of the law, which has never (...)
    Direct download (7 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  44. Andrea Whittaker (2004). Abortion, Sin, and the State in Thailand. Routledgecurzon.score: 24.0
    Although abortion remains one of the most controversial issues of our age, to date most studies have centered on the debate in Western countries. This book discusses abortion in a non-Western, non-Christian context - in Thailand, where, although abortion is illegal, over 200,000 to 300,000 abortions are performed each year by a variety of methods. The book, based on extensive original research in the field, examines a wide range of issues, including stories of the real-life dilemmas facing (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  45. E. M. Dadlez & William L. Andrews (2010). Post‐Abortion Syndrome: Creating an Affliction. Bioethics 24 (9):445 - 452.score: 24.0
    The contention that abortion harms women constitutes a new strategy employed by the pro-life movement to supplement arguments about fetal rights. David C. Reardon is a prominent promoter of this strategy. Post-abortion syndrome purports to establish that abortion psychologically harms women and, indeed, can harm persons associated with women who have abortions. Thus, harms that abortion is alleged to produce are multiplied. Claims of repression are employed to complicate efforts to disprove the existence of psychological harm (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  46. James Evans (2008). Beyond Abortion: The Looming Battle Over Death in the 'Culture Wars'. Bioethics 22 (7):379-387.score: 24.0
    By concentrating on abortion, the culture wars have avoided facing a crisis about the end of life. This paper explores four themes: (1) the technological transformation of birth and death into matters of decision, not matters of fact; (2) abortion as the nexus of Eros (sex) with Thanatos (death); (3) the real crisis, conveniently masked by our obsession with sex, looming at the end of life, not at its beginning; (4) the surplus-repression that protects us from assuming responsibility (...)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  47. Joanne Boucher (2004). Ultrasound: A Window to the Womb?: Obstetric Ultrasound and the Abortion Rights Debate. Journal of Medical Humanities 25 (1):7-19.score: 24.0
    This paper explores the rhetoric of obstetric ultrasound technology as it relates to the abortion debate, specifically the interpretation given to ultrasound images by opponents of abortion. The tenor of the anti-abortion approach is precisely captured in the videotape, Ultrasound:A Window to the Womb. Aspects of this videotape are analyzed in order to tease out the assumptions about the (female) body and about the access to truth yielded by scientific technology (ultrasound) held by militant opponents of (...). It is argued that the ultrasound images do not offer transparent confirmation of the ontological status of the embryo and fetus. Rather, the window of ultrasound is constructed through a complex combination of visual and verbal devices: ultrasound images, photographic images, verbal argument, and emotional appeal. (shrink)
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  48. Hon-Lam Li (1997). &Quot;Abortion and Degrees of Personhood: Understanding the Impasse of the Abortion Problem (and the Animal Rights Problem)&Quot;. Public Affairs Quarterly 11 (1):1-19.score: 24.0
    I argue that the personhood of a fetus is analogous to the the heap. If this is correct, then the moral status or intrinsic value of a fetus would be supervenient upon the fetus's biological development. Yet to compare its claim vis-a-vis its mother's, we need to consider not only their moral status, but also the type of claim they each have. Thus we have to give weight to the two factors or variables of the mother's moral status and her (...)
    Direct download  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  49. Eugene Mills (2013). Early Abortion and Personal Ontology. Acta Analytica 28 (1):19-30.score: 24.0
    We are beings endowed with “personal capacities”—the capacity for reason, for a concept of self, perhaps more. Among ontologically salient views about what else we are, I focus on the “Big Three.” According to animalism, we are animals that have psychological properties only contingently. According to psychologistic materialism, we are material beings; according to substance dualism, we are either immaterial beings or composites of immaterial and material ones; but according to both psychologistic materialism and substance dualism, we essentially have some (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (6 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  50. Bertha Alvarez Manninen (2014). A Kantian Defense of Abortion Rights with Respect for Intrauterine Life. Diametros 39:70-92.score: 24.0
    In this paper, I appeal to two aspects of Immanuel Kant’s philosophy – his metaphysics and ethics – in defense of abortion rights. Many Kantian pro-life philosophers argue that Kant’s second principle formulation of the categorical imperative, which proscribes treating persons as mere means, applies to human embryos and fetuses. Kant is clear, however, that he means his imperatives to apply to persons, individuals of a rational nature. It is important to determine, therefore, whether there is anything in Kant’s (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
1 — 50 / 1000