Search results for 'Abstract Ideas' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. John Russell Roberts, Innate Ideas Without Abstract Ideas: An Essay on Berkeley's Platonism.
    Draft. Berkeley denied the existence of abstract ideas and any faculty of abstraction. At the same time, however, he embraced innate ideas and a faculty of pure intellect. This paper attempts to reconcile the tension between these commitments by offering an interpretation of Berkeley's Platonism.
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  2. Mark Collier (2005). Hume and Cognitive Science: The Current Status of the Controversy Over Abstract Ideas. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 4 (2):197-207.
    In Book I, Part I, Section VII of the Treatise, Hume sets out to settle, once and for all, the early modern controversy over abstract ideas. In order to do so, he tries to accomplish two tasks: (1) he attempts to defend an exemplar-based theory of general language and thought, and (2) he sets out to refute the rival abstraction-based account. This paper examines the successes and failures of these two projects. I argue that Hume manages to articulate (...)
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    Robert McKim (1982). Wenz on Abstract Ideas and Christian Neo-Platonism. Journal of the History of Ideas 43 (4):665.
    I argue that peter wenz's claim, That berkeley's view is that abstract ideas are impossible for us but not for god, Is untenable. But the impossibility of God having abstract ideas does not, Contrary to wenz, Entail that there is no room for the divine archetypes in berkeley's system.
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  4.  12
    Howard M. Robinson (1986). 'Abstract Ideas' and Immaterialism. History of European Ideas 7 (6):617-622.
    Berkeley confidently asserts the connection between his attack on abstract ideas and immaterialism, But how the connection works has puzzled modern commentators. I construct an argument resting on the imagist theory of thought which connects anti-ionism and immaterialism and try to show that it is berkeleian. I then suggest that, Without the mistaken imagist theory, A similar and still interesting argument can be constructed to the weaker conclusion that matter is essentially unknowable.
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  5.  30
    Susan V. Castagnetto (1992). Reid's Answer to Abstract Ideas. Journal of Philosophical Research 17:39-60.
    The doctrine of abstract ideas contains Locke’s views on the nature of generality and how we think in general terms-the nature of universals, of general concepts, and how we classify. While Reid rejects abstract ideas, he accepts Locke’s insight that we have an ability to abstract. In this paper, I show how Reid preserves Locke’s insight, while providing a more versatile and forward-looking account of universals and concepts than Locke was able to give.Reid replaces (...) ideas with what he calls “general conceptions.” But general conceptions are really three different things. First, they are universals---non-mental intrinsically general objects of acts of abstraction and conception. I show how Reid is able to make the claim that there are universals without being committed to holding that universals really exist. This claim, together with his type/token distinction, enables Reid to better explain how we have knowledge of attributes and use general terms meaningfully. The general features of our experience are not ideas and are not produced by the faculty of abstraction---but that faculty enables us to distinguish them.In the second sense, a general conception is an act of mind which takes universals as objects. Thinking in general tenns is not the manipulation of abstract ideas---it is engaging in acts of conceiving. Such acts are made possible by general conceptions in the third sense, namely, general concepts. While Reid does not distinguish this sense explicitly, I argue that he takes general concepts to be dispositions or abilities to distinguish general features of objects and to use the general terms of language as other users do. So rather than producing mental entities---abstract ideas---that act as standards to help us classify, abstraction makes possible the development of abilities to use general terms and classify objects. (shrink)
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  6.  67
    Kenneth P. Winkler (1983). Berkeley on Abstract Ideas. Archiv für Geschichte der Philosophie 65 (1):63-80.
    There are three propositions that this author demonstrates in his argument: the contention that berkeley 's attack on abstract ideas is not made wholly compatible with his atomic sensationalism, that berkeley does not provide or employ a single definition or criterion for determining the limit of abstraction and that the doctrine of abstract ideas furnishes no real support to berkeley 's argument against the existence of material substance independent of perception.
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  7.  62
    C. C. W. Taylor (1978). Berkeley's Theory of Abstract Ideas. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):97-115.
    While claiming to refute locke's theory of abstract ideas, Berkeley himself accepts a form of abstractionism. Locke's account of abstraction is indeterminate between two doctrines: 1) abstract ideas are representations of paradigm instances of kinds, 2) abstract ideas are schematic representations of the defining features of kinds. Berkeley's arguments are directed exclusively against 2, And refute only a specific version of it, Which there is no reason to ascribe to locke; berkeley himself accepts (...) ideas of the former type. Locke's theory suffers from circularity and redundancy, Berkeley's from conflation of thought with imagination. (shrink)
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  8.  42
    George S. Pappas (2002). Abstract Ideas and the New Theory of Vision. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (1):55 – 69.
    In the _New Theory of Vision, Berkeley defends the heterogeneity thesis, i.e., the view that the ideas of sight and touch are numerically and specifically distinct. In sections 121-122 of that work, he suggests that the thesis of abstract ideas is somehow closely connected to the heterogeneity thesis, though he does not there fully explain just what the connection is supposed to be. In this paper an interpretation of this connection is proposed and defended. Berkeley needs to (...)
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  9. Rhys Mckinnon (2005). Dismantling the Straw Man: An Analysis of the Arguments of Hume and Berkeley Against Locke's Doctrine of Abstract Ideas. Sorites 16:38-45.
    Many believe that George Berkeley and, subsequently, David Hume offer devastating arguments against John Locke's theory of abstract ideas. It is the purpose of this paper to clarify the attacks given a close reading of Locke. It will be shown that many of the arguments of Berkeley and Hume are of a straw man nature and, moreover, that some of their conclusions are actually in accord with Locke.
     
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  10.  46
    Hans Peter Benschop (1997). Berkeley, Lee and Abstract Ideas. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 5 (1):55 – 66.
  11. Glanville Downey (1940). Representations of Abstract Ideas in the Antioch Mosaics. Journal of the History of Ideas 1 (1):112.
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  12. M. Malherbe (1986). Husserlian Critique of Berkeley Abstract Ideas. History of European Ideas 7 (6):623-631.
     
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  13. Robert McKim (1982). Wenz on Abstract Ideas and Christian Neo-Platonism in Berkeley. Journal of the History of Ideas 43 (4):665.
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  14.  10
    M. I. Posner & S. W. Keele (1968). On the Genesis of Abstract Ideas. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (2p1):353-363.
  15.  1
    Michael I. Posner & Steven W. Keele (1968). On the Genesis of Abstract Ideas. Journal of Experimental Psychology 77 (3, Pt.1):353-363.
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  16. E. J. Craig (1968). Berkeley's Attack on Abstract Ideas. Philosophical Review 77 (4):425-437.
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  17. Monroe C. Beardsley (1943). Berkeley on "Abstract Ideas". Mind 52 (206):157-170.
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  18.  45
    Willis Doney (1983). Berkeley's Argument Against Abstract Ideas. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 8 (1):295-308.
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  19. Kenneth Westphal (2005). Hume, Hegel, And General Abstract Ideas. Bulletin of the Hegel Society of Great Britain 51:28-56.
  20.  37
    Sally Ferguson (1999). Are Locke's Abstract Ideas Fictions? Review of Metaphysics 53 (1):129 - 140.
  21.  38
    Willis Doney (1956). Locke's Abstract Ideas. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):406-409.
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  22.  25
    John Linnell (1956). Locke's Abstract Ideas. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 16 (3):400-405.
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  23.  17
    Gerald Vision (1979). Hume's Attack on Abstract Ideas: Real and Imagined. Dialogue 18 (4):528-537.
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  24. Martha Brandt Bolton (1987). Berkeley's Objection to Abstract Ideas and Unconceived Objects. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel
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  25.  7
    E. J. Furlong, C. A. Mace & D. J. O'Connor (1953). Symposium: Abstract Ideas and Images. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 27 (1):121 - 158.
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  26. Alexander Aichele (2012). I Think Something That You Do Not Think, and That is Red. John Locke and George Berkeley Over Abstract Ideas and Kant's Logical Abstractionism. Kant-Studien 103 (1).
  27. Willis Doney (ed.) (1989). Berkeley on Abstraction and Abstract Ideas. Garland.
     
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  28. E. J. Furlong, C. A. Mace & D. J. O'connor (1953). Abstract Ideas and Images. Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 27:121-158.
     
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  29. John Laird (1916). WHITAKER, THOMAS.-The Theory of Abstract Ideas. [REVIEW] Mind 25:276.
     
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  30. John S. Linnell (1954). Berkeley's Criticism of Abstract Ideas. Dissertation, University of Minnesota
     
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  31. Fred Wilson (2008). 1. Abstract Ideas and Other Linguistic Rules in Hume. In The External World and Our Knowledge of It: Hume's Critical Realism, an Exposition and a Defence. University of Toronto Press 21-130.
  32.  19
    George S. Pappas (1989). Abstract General Ideas in Hume. Hume Studies 15 (2):339-352.
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  33.  14
    George S. Pappas (1977). Hume and Abstract General Ideas. Hume Studies 3 (1):17-31.
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  34.  36
    Robert Anderson Imlay (1971). Berkeley on Abstract General Ideas. Journal of the History of Philosophy 9 (3):321-328.
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  35.  16
    Mauro Carbone (1999). The Mythical Time of Ideas (Abstract). Chiasmi International 1:231-231.
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    Claudio Rozzoni (2006). Abstract: The Paths of Music: Nocturne Ideas. Chiasmi International 8:270-271.
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  37. Steven M. Bayne (2008). Abstract General Ideas and Kant's Schematism. In Valerio Hrsg V. Rohden, Ricardo Terra & Guido Almeida (eds.), Recht und Frieden in der Philosophie Kants. vol. 2, 97-105.
  38. Phillip D. Cummins (1976). Reid on Abstract General Ideas. In Stephen Francis Barker & Tom L. Beauchamp (eds.), Thomas Reid: Critical Interpretations. University City Science Center 3-62.
     
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  39. B. E. Dawson, A. M. Hodgson, M. Fyfe, D. Woodrow & A. G. E. Blake (1971). Chemical StructureBasic Ideas of Abstract MathematicsThermal Physic. British Journal of Educational Studies 19 (2):232.
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  40. Kathy Squadrito (1996). Are Locke¿s Simple Ideas Abstract? Dialogos 31:155-164.
     
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  41.  12
    Maria Adriana Camargo Cappello (2005). A crítica à abstração e à representação no imaterialismo de Berkeley. Doispontos 1 (2).
    O presente texto tem por objetivo examinar as relações existentes entre a crítica às idéias abstratas, apresentada por Berkeley na “Introdução” ao Tratado sobre os princípios do entendimento humano, e a argumentação desenvolvida nos primeiros parágrafos da Parte I do mesmo texto, em que o autor propõe seu imaterialismo. A hipótese levantada a partir de tal exame defende uma relação direta entre o nominalismo de Berkeley e o caráter inaceitável, para o autor, da distinção entre o ser e o aparecer (...)
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  42.  22
    Jani Hakkarainen (2015). Hume on Spatial Properties. In Guigon Ghislain & Rodriguez-Pereyra Gonzalo (eds.), Nominalism about Properties. Routledge 79-94.
    I defend a reading of David Hume’s nominalism that he comes close to Keith Campbell's contemporary trope theory in the specific case of spatial properties. I argue that Hume's view should be construed as classifying spatial properties as Campbellian tropes (particular properties): abstract, particular, determinate and qualitatively simple properties. This has implications for reconstructing Hume's answer to the problem of universals. I argue that Hume’s account of objects resembling each other in respect of spatial properties is grounded in the (...)
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  43.  70
    William Edward Morris (2009). Meaning(Fullness) Without Metaphysics: Another Look at Hume's “Meaning Empiricism”. Philosophia 37 (3):441-454.
    Although Hume has no developed semantic theory, in the heyday of analytic philosophy he was criticized for his “meaning empiricism,” which supposedly committed him to a private world of ideas, led him to champion a genetic account of meaning instead of an analytic one, and confused “impressions” with “perceptions of an objective realm.” But another look at Hume’s “meaning empiricism” reveals that his criterion for cognitive content, the cornerstone both of his resolutely anti-metaphysical stance and his naturalistic “science of (...)
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  44.  8
    Jeffrey Edward Green (2012). On the Difference Between a Pupil and a Historian of Ideas. Journal of the Philosophy of History 6 (1):84-110.
    Abstract This essay takes up the fundamental question of the proper place of history in the study of political thought through critical engagement with Mark Bevir's seminal work, The Logic of the History of Ideas . While I accept the claim of Bevir, as well as of other exponents of the so-called “Cambridge School,“ that there is a conceptual difference between historical and non-historical modes of reading past works of political philosophy, I resist the suggestion that this conceptual (...)
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  45.  44
    Jonathan Cottrell (2016). A Puzzle About Fictions in the Treatise. Journal of the History of Philosophy 54 (1):47-73.
    in the treatise, hume claims to identify many “fictions of the imagination” among both “vulgar” and philosophical beliefs. To name just a few, these include the fiction of one aggregate composed of many parts,1 the fiction of a material object’s identity through change, and the fiction of a human mind’s identity through change and interruption in its existence. Hume claims that these fictions and others like them are somehow defective: in his words, they are “improper,” “inexact,” or not “strict”. I (...)
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  46.  41
    Daniel Casasanto & Tania Henetz (2012). Handedness Shapes Children's Abstract Concepts. Cognitive Science 36 (2):359-372.
    Can children’s handedness influence how they represent abstract concepts like kindness and intelligence? Here we show that from an early age, right-handers associate rightward space more strongly with positive ideas and leftward space with negative ideas, but the opposite is true for left-handers. In one experiment, children indicated where on a diagram a preferred toy and a dispreferred toy should go. Right-handers tended to assign the preferred toy to a box on the right and the dispreferred toy (...)
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  47. Nicholas Jolley (1988). Leibniz and Malebranche on Innate Ideas. Philosophical Review 97 (1):71-91.
    This paper seeks to reconstruct an important controversy between leibniz and malebranche over innate ideas. It is argued that this controversy is in some ways more illuminating than the better-Known debate between leibniz and locke, For malebranche's objections to innate ideas raise fundamental questions concerning the status of dispositions and the relationship between logic and psychology. The paper shows that in order to meet malebranche's objections, Leibniz adopts a strategy which is doubly reductionist: ideas are reduced to (...)
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  48.  39
    Luiz Paulo Rouanet (2013). On the "Abstract" Character of Deliberative Democracy. Trans/Form/Ação 36 (SPE):177-194.
    O presente texto propõe-se discutir o suposto caráter abstrato da chamada democracia deliberativa, tomando como base a ética discursiva e a teoria da ação comunicativa. Se, por um lado, a democracia deliberativa não pretende ser mais que um modelo teórico para orientar as discussões em torno da democracia, por outro, alguns de seus enunciados podem e são efetivamente incorporados à prática política das sociedades democráticas contemporâneas. A questão aqui é saber o quanto de concreto e propositivo se pode encontrar especialmente (...)
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  49.  8
    Robert Weissberg (1996). The Real Marketplace of Ideas. Critical Review 10 (1):107-121.
    Abstract ?The marketplace of ideas? is a powerful legal and political metaphor?a bulwark of an open, liberal society?that suggests a positivistic debate utilizing reason and evidence. In reality, however, the marketplace of ideas often consists of illogic and bad evidence, producing clutter and confusion. The parallel with scientific research is misinformed. Evidence from collective decision?making and small group studies cast grave doubts on the ?marketplace's? ability to maximize truth.
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  50.  50
    Wen-Fang Wang (2011). Theories of Abstract Objects Without Ad Hoc Restriction. Erkenntnis 74 (1):1-15.
    The ideas of fixed points (Kripke in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 53–81, 1975; Martin and Woodruff in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 47–51, 1984) and revision sequences (Gupta and Belnap in The revision theory of truth. MIT, London, 1993; Gupta in The Blackwell guide to philosophical logic. Blackwell, London, pp 90–114, 2001) have been exploited to provide solutions to the semantic paradox and have achieved (...)
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