Search results for 'Abstract Objects' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Elijah Chudnoff (2013). Awareness of Abstract Objects. Noûs 47 (4):706-726.score: 90.0
    Awareness is a two-place determinable relation some determinates of which are seeing, hearing, etc. Abstract objects are items such as universals and functions, which contrast with concrete objects such as solids and liquids. It is uncontroversial that we are sometimes aware of concrete objects. In this paper I explore the more controversial topic of awareness of abstract objects. I distinguish two questions. First, the Existence Question: are there any experiences that make their subjects aware (...)
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  2. Richard Heck (2011). The Existence (and Non-Existence) of Abstract Objects. In Frege's Theorem. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    This paper is concerned with neo-Fregean accounts of reference to abstract objects. It develops an objection to the most familiar such accounts, due to Bob Hale and Crispin Wright, based upon what I call the 'proliferation problem': Hale and Wright's account makes reference to abstract objects seem too easy, as is shown by the fact that any equivalence relation seems as good as any other. The paper then develops a response to this objection, and offers an (...)
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  3. Friederike Moltmann (2013). Abstract Objects and the Semantics of Natural Language. Oxford University Press.score: 90.0
    Philosophers have defended various views about abstract objects by appealing to metaphysical considerations, considerations regarding mathematics or science, and, not infrequently, intuitions about natural language. This book pursues the question of how and whether natural language allows for reference to abstract objects in a fully systematic way. By making full use of contemporary linguistic semantics, it presents a much greater range of linguistic generalizations than has previously been taken into consideration in philosophical discussions, and it argues (...)
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  4. Edward N. Zalta (1999). Natural Numbers and Natural Cardinals as Abstract Objects: A Partial Reconstruction of Frege"s Grundgesetze in Object Theory. [REVIEW] Journal of Philosophical Logic 28 (6):619-660.score: 90.0
    In this paper, the author derives the Dedekind-Peano axioms for number theory from a consistent and general metaphysical theory of abstract objects. The derivation makes no appeal to primitive mathematical notions, implicit definitions, or a principle of infinity. The theorems proved constitute an important subset of the numbered propositions found in Frege's Grundgesetze. The proofs of the theorems reconstruct Frege's derivations, with the exception of the claim that every number has a successor, which is derived from a modal (...)
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  5. Paul Gould (2013). Can God Create Abstract Objects? A Reply to Peter van Inwagen. Sophia:1-14.score: 90.0
    The Platonic theist Peter van Inwagen argues that God cannot create abstract objects. Thus, the quantifier ‘everything’ in traditional statements of the doctrine of creation should be appropriately restricted to things that can enter into causal relations and abstract objects cannot: ‘God is the creator of everything distinct from himself…that can enter into causal relations.’ I respond to van Inwagen arguing that he has provided no good reason for thinking abstract objects must be uncreated. (...)
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  6. Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.) (2013). Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.score: 76.0
    TABLE OF CONTENTS Introduction: Art, Metaphysics, & The Paradox of Standards (Christy Mag Uidhir) GENERAL ONTOLOGICAL ISSUES 1. Must Ontological Pragmatism be Self-Defeating? (Guy Rohrbaugh) 2. Indication, Abstraction, & Individuation (Jerrold Levinson) 3. Destroying Artworks (Marcus Rossberg) INFORMATIVE COMPARISONS 4. Artworks & Indefinite Extensibility (Roy T. Cook) 5. Historical Individuals Like Anas platyrhynchos & ‘Classical Gas’ (P.D. Magnus) 6. Repeatable Artworks & Genericity (Shieva Kleinschmidt & Jacob Ross) ARGUMENTS AGAINST & ALTERNATIVES TO 7. Against Repeatable Artworks (Allan Hazlett) 8. How (...)
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  7. Martin Lin, Time, Causation, and Abstract Objects.score: 75.0
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  8. Paul L. Simard Smith & Andrei Moldovan (2011). Arguments as Abstract Objects. Informal Logic 31 (3):230-261.score: 74.0
    In recent discussions concerning the definition of argument, it has been maintained that the word ‘argument’ exhibits the process-product ambiguity, or an act/object ambigu-ity. Drawing on literature on lexical ambiguity we argue that ‘argument’ is not ambiguous. The term ‘argu-ment’ refers to an object, not to a speech act. We also examine some of the important implications of our argument by considering the question: what sort of abstract objects are arguments?
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  9. George Duke (2012). Dummett on Abstract Objects. Palgrave Macmillan.score: 70.0
    This book offers an historically-informed critical assessment of Dummett's account of abstract objects, examining in detail some of the Fregean presuppositions whilst also engaging with recent work on the problem of abstract entities.
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  10. Eric Margolis & Stephen Laurence (2007). The Ontology of Concepts: Abstract Objects or Mental Representations? Noûs 41 (4):561-593.score: 60.0
    What is a concept? Philosophers have given many different answers to this question, reflecting a wide variety of approaches to the study of mind and language. Nonetheless, at the most general level, there are two dominant frameworks in contemporary philosophy. One proposes that concepts are mental representations, while the other proposes that they are abstract objects. This paper looks at the differences between these two approaches, the prospects for combining them, and the issues that are involved in the (...)
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  11. Wen-Fang Wang (2011). Theories of Abstract Objects Without Ad Hoc Restriction. Erkenntnis 74 (1):1-15.score: 60.0
    The ideas of fixed points (Kripke in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 53–81, 1975; Martin and Woodruff in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 47–51, 1984) and revision sequences (Gupta and Belnap in The revision theory of truth. MIT, London, 1993; Gupta in The Blackwell guide to philosophical logic. Blackwell, London, pp 90–114, 2001) have been exploited to provide solutions to the semantic paradox and have achieved admirable (...)
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  12. Michael Liston (2004). Knowledge, Cause, and Abstract Objects: Causal Objections to Platonism. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (2):356 – 359.score: 60.0
    Book Information Knowledge, Cause, and Abstract Objects: Causal Objections to Platonism. Knowledge, Cause, and Abstract Objects: Causal Objections to Platonism Colin Cheyne , Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers , 2001 , xvi + 236 , £55 ( cloth ) By Colin Cheyne. Dordrecht: Kluwer Academic Publishers. Pp. xvi + 236. £55.
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  13. Linda Wetzel (2009). Types and Tokens: On Abstract Objects. Mit Press.score: 60.0
    In this book, Linda Wetzel examines the distinction between types and tokens and argues that types exist (as abstract objects, since they lack a unique ...
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  14. Edward N. Zalta (2006). Deriving and Validating Kripkean Claims Using the Theory of Abstract Objects. Noûs 40 (4):591–622.score: 60.0
    In this paper, the author shows how one can independently prove, within the theory of abstract objects, some of the most significant claims, hypotheses, and background assumptions found in Kripke's logical and philosophical work. Moreover, many of the semantic features of theory of abstract objects are consistent with Kripke's views — the successful representation, in the system, of the truth conditions and entailments of philosophically puzzling sentences of natural language validates certain Kripkean semantic claims about natural (...)
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  15. Bob Hale (2013). Review of G. Duke: Dummett on Abstract Objects. [REVIEW] Journal for the History of Analytical Philosophy 2 (2).score: 60.0
    Review of G. Duke: Dummett onObjects References G. Frege. Über Sinn und Bedeutung. Zeitschrift für Philosophie und philosophische Kritik, 100, 25–50, 1892. Translated in G.Frege, Collected Papers on Mathematics, Logic and Philosophy, edited by B. McGuinness. Oxford, Basil Blackwell, 157–77. G. Frege. Die Grundlagen der Arithmetik. Breslau, Verlag von W. Koebner, 1884. Translated by J.L. Austin as The Foundations of Arithmetic, Oxford, Basil Blackwell, second revised edition 1953. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy of Language. London, Duckworth, 1973. M. Dummett. Frege: Philosophy (...)
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  16. A. Sierszulska (2006). On Tichy's Determiners and Zalta's Abstract Objects. Axiomathes 16 (4):486-498.score: 60.0
    It is not a common practice to postulate meaning entities treated as objects of some kind. The paper demonstrates two ways of introducing meaning-objects in two logics of natural language, Tichy’s Transparent Intensional Logic and Zalta’s Intensional Logic of Abstract Objects. Tichy’s theory belongs to the Fregean line of thinking, with what he calls ‘constructions’ as Fregean senses, and ‘determiners’ as object-like meaning entities constructed by the senses. Zalta’s theory belongs to Meinongian logics and he postulates (...)
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  17. Marcus Rossberg (2013). Destroying Artworks. In Christy Mag Uidhir (ed.), Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.score: 60.0
    This paper investigates feasible ways of destroying artworks, assuming they are abstract objects, or works of a particular art-form, where the works of at least this art-form are assumed to be abstracta. If artworks are eternal, mind-independent abstracta, and hence discovered, rather than created, then they cannot be destroyed, but merely forgotten. For more moderate conceptions of artworks as abstract objects, however, there might be logical space for artwork destruction. Artworks as abstracta have been likened to (...)
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  18. David J. Anderson & Edward N. Zalta (2004). Frege, Boolos, and Logical Objects. Journal of Philosophical Logic 33 (1):1-26.score: 54.0
    In this paper, the authors discuss Frege's theory of "logical objects" (extensions, numbers, truth-values) and the recent attempts to rehabilitate it. We show that the 'eta' relation George Boolos deployed on Frege's behalf is similar, if not identical, to the encoding mode of predication that underlies the theory of abstract objects. Whereas Boolos accepted unrestricted Comprehension for Properties and used the 'eta' relation to assert the existence of logical objects under certain highly restricted conditions, the theory (...)
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  19. A. M. Borghi, A. Flumini, F. Cimatti, D. Marocco & C. Scorolli (2010). Manipulating Objects and Telling Words: A Study on Concrete and Abstract Words Acquisition. Frontiers in Psychology 2:15-15.score: 54.0
    Four experiments (E1-E2-E3-E4) investigated whether different acquisition modalities lead to the emergence of differences typically found between concrete and abstract words, as argued by the Words As Tools (WAT) proposal. To mimic the acquisition of concrete and abstract concepts, participants either manipulated novel objects or observed groups of objects interacting in novel ways (training1). In TEST 1 participants decided whether two elements belonged to the same category. Later they read the category labels (training2); labels could be (...)
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  20. Øystein Linnebo (2012). Reference by Abstraction. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 112 (1pt1):45-71.score: 48.0
    Frege suggests that criteria of identity should play a central role in the explanation of reference, especially to abstract objects. This paper develops a precise model of how we can come to refer to a particular kind of abstract object, namely, abstract letter types. It is argued that the resulting abstract referents are ‘metaphysically lightweight’.
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  21. Daniel A. Kaufman (2002). Composite Objects and the Abstract/Concrete Distinction. Journal of Philosophical Research 27:215-238.score: 48.0
    In his latest book, Realistic Rationalism (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1998), Jerrold J. Katz proposes an ontology designed to handle putative counterexamples to the traditional abstract/concrete distinction. Objects like the equator and impure sets, which appear to have both abstract and concrete components, are problematic for classical Platonism, whose exclusive categories of objects with spatiotemporal location and objects lacking spatial or temporal location leave no room for them. Katz proposes to add a “composite” category to (...)
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  22. Jonathan Payne (2013). Abstract Objects and the Semantics of Natural Language, by Moltmann Friederike. Australasian Journal of Philosophy 92 (1):209-209.score: 48.0
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  23. Irving Thalberg (1986). The Immateriality of Abstract Objects and the Mental. Analysis 46 (March):93-97.score: 47.0
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  24. Bob Hale (1988). Abstract Objects. B. Blackwell.score: 47.0
  25. Cian Dorr (2008). There Are No Abstract Objects. In Theodore Sider, John Hawthorne & Dean W. Zimmerman (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Metaphysics. Blackwell.score: 45.0
    I explicate and defend the claim that, fundamentally speaking, there are no numbers, sets, properties or relations. The clarification consists in some remarks on the relevant sense of ‘fundamentally speaking’ and the contrasting sense of ‘superficially speaking’. The defence consists in an attempt to rebut two arguments for the existence of such entities. The first is a version of the indispensability argument, which purports to show that certain mathematical entities are required for good scientific explanations. The second is a speculative (...)
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  26. Gideon Rosen, Abstract Objects. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.score: 45.0
  27. Friederike Moltmann (2013). Reference to Numbers in Natural Language. Philosophical Studies 162 (3):499 - 536.score: 45.0
    A common view is that natural language treats numbers as abstract objects, with expressions like the number of planets, eight, as well as the number eight acting as referential terms referring to numbers. In this paper I will argue that this view about reference to numbers in natural language is fundamentally mistaken. A more thorough look at natural language reveals a very different view of the ontological status of natural numbers. On this view, numbers are not primarily treated (...)
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  28. Edward N. Zalta (1983). Abstract Objects: An Introduction to Axiomatic Metaphysics. D. Reidel.score: 45.0
    . THEORY, DATA, AND EXPLANATION In this book, we shall produce a research program in metaphysics. Following Lakatos, a research program in metaphysics ...
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  29. E. J. Lowe (1995). The Metaphysics of Abstract Objects. Journal of Philosophy 92 (10):509-524.score: 45.0
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  30. Crispin Wright & Bob Hale (1992). Nominalism and the Contingency of Abstract Objects. Journal of Philosophy 89 (3):111-135.score: 45.0
  31. David Bell & W. D. Hart (1979). The Epistemology of Abstract Objects: Access and Inference. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 53:153-165.score: 45.0
  32. Stephen Yablo (2002). Abstract Objects: A Case Study. Noûs 36 (s1):220 - 240.score: 45.0
  33. Christy Mag Uidhir (2013). Art, Metaphysics, & the Paradox of Standards. In , Art & Abstract Objects. Oxford University Press.score: 45.0
    I consider the field of aesthetics to be at its most productive and engaging when adopting a broadly philosophically informative approach to its core issues (e.g., shaping and testing putative art theoretic commitments against the relevant standard models employed in philosophy of language, metaphysics, and philosophy of mind) and to be at its most impotent and bewildering when cultivating a philosophically insular character (e.g., selecting interpretative, ontological, or conceptual models solely for fit with pre-fixed art theoretic commitments). For example, when (...)
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  34. Steven E. Boër (2009). Propositions and the Substitution Anomaly. Journal of Philosophical Logic 38 (5):549 - 586.score: 45.0
    The Substitution Anomaly is the failure of intuitively coreferential expressions of the corresponding forms “that S” and “the proposition that S” to be intersubstitutable salva veritate under certain ‘selective’ attitudinal verbs that grammatically accept both sorts of terms as complements. The Substitution Anomaly poses a direct threat to the basic assumptions of Millianism, which predict the interchangeability of “that S” and “the proposition that S”. Jeffrey King has argued persuasively that the most plausible Millian solution is to treat the selective (...)
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  35. Michael J. Loux (1986). Toward an Aristotelian Theory of Abstract Objects. Midwest Studies in Philosophy 11 (1):495-512.score: 45.0
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  36. Charles Sayward (2002). A Conversation About Numbers. Philosophia 29 (1-4):191-209.score: 45.0
    This is a dialogue in which five characters are involved. Various issues in the philosophy of mathematics are discussed. Among those issues are these: numbers as abstract objects, our knowledge of numbers as abstract objects, a proof as showing a mathematical statement to be true as opposed to the statement being true in virtue of having a proof.
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  37. Peter Simons (1989). Determinacy of Abstract Objects: The Platonist's Dilemma. Topoi 8 (1):35-42.score: 45.0
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  38. James Robert Brown (1988). Abstract Objects Bob Hale Oxford: Blackwell, 1987. Pp. 282. $75.00. [REVIEW] Dialogue 27 (04):729-.score: 45.0
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  39. Mark McEvoy (2003). Language and Other Abstract Objects [1981]: The Metaphysics of Linguistics. Philosophical Forum 34 (3-4):427–438.score: 45.0
  40. Scott A. Davison (1991). Could Abstract Objects Depend Upon God? Religious Studies 27 (4):485 - 497.score: 45.0
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  41. Leslie H. Tharp (1971). Truth, Quantification, and Abstract Objects. Noûs 5 (4):363-372.score: 45.0
  42. James Willard Oliver (1960). Note on Contingent Properties of Abstract Objects. Philosophical Studies 11 (1-2):16 -.score: 45.0
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  43. M. F. Sharlow (2006). Chemical Elements and the Problem of Universals. Foundations of Chemistry 8 (3):225-242.score: 45.0
    In this paper, I explore a seldom-recognized connection between the ontology of abstract objects and a current issue in the philosophy of chemistry. Specifically, I argue that realism with regard to universals implies a view of chemical elements similar to F.A. Paneth’s thesis about the dual nature of the concept of element.
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  44. Harold T. Hodes (1992). Abstract Objects. International Studies in Philosophy 24 (3):146-148.score: 45.0
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  45. Mike Dillinger (1984). Book Review:Language and Other Abstract Objects J. J. Katz. [REVIEW] Philosophy of Science 51 (1):175-.score: 45.0
  46. Reina Hayaki (2009). Fictional Characters as Abstract Objects: Some Questions. American Philosophical Quarterly 46 (2):141 - 149.score: 45.0
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  47. H. W. Noonan (1976). Dummett on Abstract Objects. Analysis 36 (2):49 - 54.score: 45.0
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  48. Claire Horisk (2003). Pretense and Abstract Objects. Southwest Philosophy Review 19 (2):85-88.score: 45.0
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  49. Jonathan Payne (2013). Abstract Objects and the Semantics of Natural Language, by Moltmann Friederike: Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2013, Pp. X+ 244,£ 40 (Hardback). [REVIEW] Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-1.score: 45.0
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