Search results for 'Abstractionism' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Benjamin Bayer (2011). A Role for Abstractionism in a Direct Realist Foundationalism. Synthese 180 (3):357-389.
    Both traditional and naturalistic epistemologists have long assumed that the examination of human psychology has no relevance to the prescriptive goal of traditional epistemology, that of providing first-person guidance in determining the truth. Contrary to both, I apply insights about the psychology of human perception and concept-formation to a very traditional epistemological project: the foundationalist approach to the epistemic regress problem. I argue that direct realism about perception can help solve the regress problem and support a foundationalist account of justification, (...)
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  2.  19
    Therese Scarpelli Cory (2015). Rethinking Abstractionism: Aquinas's Intellectual Light and Some Arabic Sources. Journal of the History of Philosophy 53 (4):607-646.
    The thesis of this paper is that Thomas Aquinas offers an alternative model of abstraction (the Active Principle Model) that overcomes the standard objections to abstractionism and expands our view of what an abstractionist theory might look like. I contend that this alternative model of abstraction has been invisible in plain sight, in Aquinas’s references to the mind’s abstractive mechanism as an “intellectual light.” Such language is not metaphorical but rather technical, signaling that intellectual abstraction is to be modeled (...)
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  3.  69
    Samuel C. Rickless (2012). The Relation Between Anti-Abstractionism and Idealism in Berkeley's Metaphysics. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (4):723 - 740.
    George Berkeley maintains both anti-abstractionism (that abstract ideas are impossible) and idealism (that physical objects and their qualities are mind-dependent). Some scholars (including Atherton, Bolton, and Pappas) have argued, in different ways, that Berkeley uses anti-abstractionism as a premise in a simple argument for idealism. In this paper, I argue that the relation between anti-abstractionism and idealism in Berkeley's metaphysics is more complex than these scholars acknowledge. Berkeley distinguishes between two kinds of abstraction, singling abstraction and generalizing (...)
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  4.  26
    Peter Milne (2007). Existence, Freedom, Identity, and the Logic of Abstractionist Realism. Mind 116 (461):23-53.
    From the point of view of proof-theoretic semantics, we examine the logical background invoked by Neil Tennant's abstractionist realist account of mathematical existence. To prepare the way, we must first look closely at the rule of existential elimination familiar from classical and intuitionist logics and at rules governing identity. We then examine how well free logics meet the harmony and uniqueness constraints familiar from the proof-theoretic semantics project. Tennant assigns a special role to atomic formulas containing singular terms. This, we (...)
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  5. Philip A. Ebert & Marcus Rossberg (eds.) (2017). Abstractionism: Essays in Philosophy of Mathematics. Oxford University Press Uk.
    ionism, which is a development of Frege's original Logicism, is a recent and much debated position in the philosophy of mathematics. This volume contains 16 original papers by leading scholars on the philosophical and mathematical aspects of Abstractionism. After an extensive editors' introduction to the topic of abstractionism, the volume is split into 4 sections. The contributions within these sections explore the semantics and meta-ontology of Abstractionism, abstractionist epistemology, the mathematics of Abstractionis, and finally, Frege's application constraint (...)
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  6.  36
    Alberto Vanzo (forthcoming). Kant and Abstractionism About Concept Formation. In Stefano Di Bella & Tad M. Schmaltz (eds.), Universals in Modern Philosophy. Oxford University Press
    This chapter outlines Kant’s account of empirical concept formation and discusses two objections that have been advanced against it. Kant holds that we form empirical concepts, such as colour concepts, by comparing sensory representations of individuals, identifying shared features, and abstracting from the differences between them. According to the first objection, we cannot acquire colour concepts in this way because there is no feature that all and only the instances of a given colour share and the boundary between colours is (...)
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  7. Ewing Y. Chinn (1994). The Anti-Abstractionism of Dignāga and Berkeley. Philosophy East and West 44 (1):55-77.
  8.  7
    Shay Allen Logan (2015). Abstractionist Categories of Categories. Review of Symbolic Logic 8 (4):705-721.
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  9. Margaret Atherton (1987). Berkeley's Anti-Abstractionism. In Ernest Sosa (ed.), Essays on the Philosophy of George Berkeley. D. Reidel
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  10.  35
    Houston Smit (2001). Aquinas's Abstractionism. Medieval Philosophy and Theology 10 (1):85-118.
    According to St. Thomas, the natures of material things are the proper objects of human understanding. 1 And he holds that, at least in this life, humans cognize these natures, not through innate species or by perceiving the divine exemplars, but only by abstraction from phantasms (ST Ia, 84.7, 85.1). 2 More precisely, the human intellects potency to understand. 3 The aim of the present piece is to clarify Thomass antinativism—arguably the most important historical and philosophical legacy of his cognitive (...)
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  11.  35
    M. Glouberman (1994). Berkeley's Anti-Abstractionism. British Journal for the History of Philosophy 2 (1):145 – 163.
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  12. Anthony Lisska (1973). Deely and Geach on Abstractionism in Thomistic Epistemology. The Thomist 37 (3):548-568.
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  13. Francisco J. Romero Carrasquillo (2011). An Abstractionist Correction of Avicenna's Theory of Intentionality in the Early Averroes. Acta Philosophica 20 (2):405 - 420.
     
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  14. Alexander Aichele (2012). I Think Something That You Do Not Think, and That is Red. John Locke and George Berkeley Over Abstract Ideas and Kant's Logical Abstractionism. Kant-Studien 103 (1).
  15. R. Gallie, Abstraction and Abstractionism. Locke Studies 25:63.
     
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  16. Giovanna R. Giardina (2008). Abstractionism and Projectionism in Proclo's' In Euclidem'. Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 63 (1):29-39.
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  17. Michael Potter (2010). Abstractionist Class Theory : Is There Any Such Thing? In T. J. Smiley, Jonathan Lear & Alex Oliver (eds.), The Force of Argument: Essays in Honor of Timothy Smiley. Routledge
    A discussion of the philosophical prospects for basing a neo-Fregean theory of classes on a principle that attempts to articulate the limitation-of-size conception.
     
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  18. Philip A. Ebert & Marcus Rossberg (eds.) (forthcoming). Abstractionism. Oxford University Press.
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  19. Carol Ann Smith (1972). Abstractionism: Contemporary Attacks and Alternatives. Dissertation, University of Pittsburgh
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  20. Jiri Benovsky (2008). Two Concepts of Possible Worlds – or Only One? Theoria 74 (4):318-330.
    In his "Two concepts of possible worlds", Peter Van Inwagen explores two kinds of views about the nature of possible worlds : abstractionism and concretism. The latter is the view defended by David Lewis who claims that possible worlds are concrete spatio-temporal universes, very much like our own, causally and spatio-temporally disconnected from each other. The former is the view of the majority who claims that possible worlds are some kind of abstract objects – such as propositions, properties, states (...)
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  21.  14
    Brent D. Slife (2004). Taking Practice Seriously: Toward a Relational Ontology. Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 24 (2):157-178.
    Mainstream psychologists have not only ignored the unique and radical character of practice; they have generally misunderstood it. A major reason for this ignorance and misunderstanding is mainstream psychology's assumption of a particular ontology--abstractionism. With abstractionism, psychologists have generally assumed that abstractions, such as theories, techniques, and principles, capture and embody the fundamentally real. Most pertinently, abstractions are believed to precede and lay the foundation for good and thoughtful practice. Indeed, practices do not exist, in an important ontological (...)
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  22.  69
    Peter T. Geach (1957). Mental Acts: Their Content And Their Objects. Humanities Press.
    ACT, CONTENT, AND OBJECT THE TITLE I have chosen for this work is a mere label for a set of problems; the controversial views that have historically been ...
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  23. Maciej Sendłak (forthcoming). Dwa typy abstrakcjonizmu w ontologii fikcji. Przegląd Filozoficzno-Literacki.
    "The main aim of the paper is to compare two types of abstractionistic accounts of fictional objects, and to analyze their consequences for interpretation of existential quantification. According to a proponent of general abstractionistic theory, fictional objects have abstract nature in a way similar to contracts, marriages, and the likes. This view is an alternative to strongly realistic accounts of fictional objects, defended by Terence Parsons or David Lewis. Within abstractionistic theories, as in all philosophical areas, one can find divergences (...)
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  24.  16
    Eleonora Orlando (2016). Fictional Names and Literary Characters: A Defence of Abstractism. Theoria 31 (2):143-158.
    This paper is focused on the abstractist theory of fiction, namely, the semantic theory according to which fictional names refer to abstract entities. Two semantic problems that arise in relation to that position are analysed: the first is the problem of accounting for the intuitive truth of typically fictive uses of statements containing fictional names; the second is the one of explaining some problematic metafictive uses, in particular, the use of intuitively true negative existentials.
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  25.  99
    Jonathan Payne (2013). Abstraction Relations Need Not Be Reflexive. Thought: A Journal of Philosophy 2 (2):137-147.
    Neo-Fregeans such as Bob Hale and Crispin Wright seek a foundation of mathematics based on abstraction principles. These are sentences involving a relation called the abstraction relation. It is usually assumed that abstraction relations must be equivalence relations, so reflexive, symmetric and transitive. In this article I argue that abstraction relations need not be reflexive. I furthermore give an application of non-reflexive abstraction relations to restricted abstraction principles.
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  26.  2
    Roy T. Cook (ed.) (2007). The Arché Papers on the Mathematics of Abstraction. Springer.
    Unique in presenting a thoroughgoing examination of the mathematical aspects of the neo-logicist project (and the particular philosophical issues arising from these technical concerns).
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  27.  66
    Daniel Kodaj (2013). Open Future and Modal Anti-Realism. Philosophical Studies 168 (2):1-22.
    Open future is incompatible with realism about possible worlds. Since realistically conceived (concrete or abstract) possible worlds are maximal in the sense that they contain/represent the full history of a possible spacetime, past and future included, if such a world is actual now, the future is fully settled now, which rules out openness. The kind of metaphysical indeterminacy required for open future is incompatible with the kind of maximality which is built into the concept of possible worlds. The paper discusses (...)
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  28.  75
    John Turri (2012). Reasons, Answers, and Goals. Journal of Moral Philosophy 9 (4):491-499.
    I discuss two arguments against the view that reasons are propositions. I consider responses to each argument, including recent responses due to Mark Schroeder, and suggest further responses of my own. In each case, the discussion proceeds by comparing reasons to answers and goals.
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  29. Rasmus Grønfeldt Winther (2014). James and Dewey on Abstraction. The Pluralist 9 (2):1-28.
    Reification is to abstraction as disease is to health. Whereas abstraction is singling out, symbolizing, and systematizing, reification is neglecting abstractive context, especially functional, historical, and analytical-level context. William James and John Dewey provide similar and nuanced arguments regarding the perils and promises of abstraction. They share an abstraction-reification account. The stages of abstraction and the concepts of “vicious abstractionism,” “/the/ psychologist’s fallacy,” and “the philosophic fallacy” in the works of these pragmatists are here analyzed in detail. For instance, (...)
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  30.  32
    Fraser MacBride (forthcoming). NeoFregean Metaontology. In P. Ebert & M. Rossberg (eds.), Abstractionism. Oxford University Press
  31.  61
    Christopher Menzel (2013). Possible Worlds. Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    This article includes a basic overview of possible world semantics and a relatively comprehensive overview of three central philosophical conceptions of possible worlds: Concretism (represented chiefly by Lewis), Abstractionism (represented chiefly by Plantinga), and Combinatorialism (represented chiefly by Armstrong).
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  32. Anne Newstead (2001). Aristotle and Modern Mathematical Theories of the Continuum. In Demetra Sfendoni-Mentzou & James Brown (eds.), Aristotle and Contemporary Philosophy of Science. Peter Lang
    This paper is on Aristotle's conception of the continuum. It is argued that although Aristotle did not have the modern conception of real numbers, his account of the continuum does mirror the topology of the real number continuum in modern mathematics especially as seen in the work of Georg Cantor. Some differences are noted, particularly as regards Aristotle's conception of number and the modern conception of real numbers. The issue of whether Aristotle had the notion of open versus closed intervals (...)
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  33.  79
    Bob Hale & Crispin Wright (2007). Abstraction and Additional Nature. Philosophia Mathematica 16 (2):182-208.
    What is wrong with abstraction’, Michael Potter and Peter Sullivan explain a further objection to the abstractionist programme in the foundations of mathematics which they first presented in their ‘Hale on Caesar’ and which they believe our discussion in The Reason's Proper Study misunderstood. The aims of the present note are: To get the character of this objection into sharper focus; To explore further certain of the assumptions—primarily, about reference-fixing in mathematics, about certain putative limitations of abstractionist set theory, and (...)
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  34.  10
    Douglas M. Jesseph (2005). Berkeley's Philosophy of Mathematics. In Kenneth Winkler (ed.), Philosophical Review. Cambridge University Press 126-128.
    The dissertation is a detailed analysis of Berkeley's writings on mathematics, concentrating on the link between his attack on the theory of abstract ideas and his philosophy of mathematics. Although the focus is on Berkeley's works, I also trace the important connections between Berkeley's views and those of Isaac Barrow, John Wallis, John Keill, and Isaac Newton . The basic thesis I defend is that Berkeley's philosophy of mathematics is a natural extension of his views on abstraction. The first chapter (...)
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  35.  69
    Roy T. Cook (2009). Hume's Big Brother: Counting Concepts and the Bad Company Objection. Synthese 170 (3):349 - 369.
    A number of formal constraints on acceptable abstraction principles have been proposed, including conservativeness and irenicity. Hume’s Principle, of course, satisfies these constraints. Here, variants of Hume’s Principle that allow us to count concepts instead of objects are examined. It is argued that, prima facie, these principles ought to be no more problematic than HP itself. But, as is shown here, these principles only enjoy the formal properties that have been suggested as indicative of acceptability if certain constraints on the (...)
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  36. Jiri Benovsky (2006). Persistence Through Time and Across Possible Worlds. Ontos Verlag.
    How do ordinary objects persist through time and across possible worlds ? How do they manage to have their temporal and modal properties ? These are the questions adressed in this book which is a "guided tour of theories of persistence". The book is divided in two parts. In the first, the two traditional accounts of persistence through time (endurantism and perdurantism) are combined with presentism and eternalism to yield four different views, and their variants. The resulting views are then (...)
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  37.  50
    Michael Potter & Peter Sullivan (2005). What Is Wrong with Abstraction? Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):187-193.
    We correct a misunderstanding by Hale and Wright of an objection we raised earlier to their abstractionist programme for rehabilitating logicism in the foundations of mathematics.
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  38. Steven Lehar (1998). Gestalt Isomorphism and the Primacy of the Subjective Perceptual Experience. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):763-764.
    The Gestalt principle of isomorphism reveals the primacy of subjective experience as a valid source of evidence for the information encoded neurophysiologically. This theory invalidates the abstractionist view that the neurophysiological representation can be of lower dimensionality than the percept to which it gives rise.
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  39. Friederike Moltmann (2016). The Number of Planets, a Number-Referring Term? In Philip A. Ebert & Marcus Rossberg (eds.), Abstractionism. Oxford University Press 113-129.
    The question whether numbers are objects is a central question in the philosophy of mathematics. Frege made use of a syntactic criterion for objethood: numbers are objects because there are singular terms that stand for them, and not just singular terms in some formal language, but in natural language in particular. In particular, Frege (1884) thought that both noun phrases like the number of planets and simple numerals like eight as in (1) are singular terms referring to numbers as abstract (...)
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  40.  62
    C. C. W. Taylor (1978). Berkeley's Theory of Abstract Ideas. Philosophical Quarterly 28 (111):97-115.
    While claiming to refute locke's theory of abstract ideas, Berkeley himself accepts a form of abstractionism. Locke's account of abstraction is indeterminate between two doctrines: 1) abstract ideas are representations of paradigm instances of kinds, 2) abstract ideas are schematic representations of the defining features of kinds. Berkeley's arguments are directed exclusively against 2, And refute only a specific version of it, Which there is no reason to ascribe to locke; berkeley himself accepts abstract ideas of the former type. (...)
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  41.  28
    Søren Harnow Klausen (2013). Approaching the Abstract: Building Blocks for an Epistemology of Abstract Objects. Semiotica 2013 (194):3-20.
    Abstract objects are widely held to pose a formidable epistemological challenge. It has seemed mysterious to many how we can have access to such strange and intangible entities. The article considers five influential ways to meet the challenge: Transcendental arguments, the indispensability argument, insisting that we just are able to grasp abstract objects and that no further explanation is needed, abstractionist accounts, and ontological reduction. None of these approaches is by itself sufficient or completely convincing, but together they make out (...)
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  42.  50
    Wen-Fang Wang (2011). Theories of Abstract Objects Without Ad Hoc Restriction. Erkenntnis 74 (1):1-15.
    The ideas of fixed points (Kripke in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 53–81, 1975; Martin and Woodruff in Recent essays on truth and the liar paradox. Clarendon Press, London, pp 47–51, 1984) and revision sequences (Gupta and Belnap in The revision theory of truth. MIT, London, 1993; Gupta in The Blackwell guide to philosophical logic. Blackwell, London, pp 90–114, 2001) have been exploited to provide solutions to the semantic paradox and have achieved admirable (...)
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  43.  61
    Gyula Klima (2010). Indifference Vs. Universality of Mental Representation in Ockham, Buridan, and Aquinas. Questio. Yearbook of the History of Metaphysics 10 (1):99-110.
    This paper argues in the first place that nominalists are right in insisting against ontological realists that semantic universality does not require commitment to universal entities. However, Ockham, in his zeal to get rid of Scotus’s universal entities, swept under the carpet the issue of universal representational content of genuinely universal symbols, conflating it with the mere indifference of the information content of non-distinctive singular representations. Buridan did come up with an abstractionist theory of the formation of genuinely universal representational (...)
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  44.  19
    Steven Rappaport (1996). Abstraction and Unrealistic Assumptions in Economics∗. Journal of Economic Methodology 3 (2):215-236.
    Economics has been persistently criticized for its heavy reliance on unrealistic assumptions. Some people reply to this criticism by saying that the unrealistic assumptions of economics result from abstraction from unimportant details, and abstraction is necessary for knowledge of a complex real world. So, far from unrealistic assumptions detracting from the epistemic worth of economics, such assumptions are essential for economic knowledge. I call this line of argument ?the Abstractionist Defense?. After clarifying abstraction, unrealistic assumptions and kindred notions, I show (...)
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  45.  20
    Richard C. Taylor & Max Herrera (2005). Aquinas's Naturalized Epistemology. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:85-102.
    Recently much interest has been shown in the notion of intelligible species in the thought of Thomas Aquinas. Intelligible species supposedly explain humanknowing of the world and universals. However, in some cases, the historical context and the philosophical sources employed by Aquinas have been sorely neglected. As a result, new interpretations have been set forth which needlessly obscure an already controversial and perhaps even philosophically tenuous doctrine. Using a recent article by Houston Smit as an example of a novel and (...)
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  46. Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen (forthcoming). Hume's Principle and Entitlement: On the Epistemology of the Neo-Fregean Programme. In Philip Ebert & Marcus Rossberg (eds.), Abstractionism. Oxford University Press
  47.  22
    Matthew David & Iain Wilkinson (2002). Critical Theory of Society or Self-Critical Society? Critical Horizons 3 (1):131-158.
    This paper presents a critical comparative reading of Ulrich Beck and Herbert Marcuse. Beck's thesis on 'selfcritical society' and the concept of 'sub-politics' are evaluated within the framework of Marcusian critical theory. We argue for the continued relevance of Marcuse for the project of emancipatory politics. We recognise that a focus upon the imminent and spontaneous possibilities for radical social change within the 'sub-political' is a useful provocation to the high abstractionism of much critical theory, but suggest that such (...)
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  48.  22
    Giovanni Battista Grandi (2009). Comments on Daniel E. Flage's “Berkeley's Contingent Necessities”. Philosophia 37 (3):373-378.
    According to Daniel Flage, Berkeley thinks that all necessary truths are founded on acts of will that assign meanings to words. After briefly commenting on the air of paradox contained in the title of Flage’s paper, and on the historical accuracy of Berkeley’s understanding of the abstractionist tradition, I make some remarks on two points made by Flage. Firstly, I discuss Flage’s distinction between the ontological ground of a necessary truth and our knowledge of a necessary truth. Secondly, I discuss (...)
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  49.  11
    Alexander Aichele (2012). Ich denke was, was Du nicht denkst, und das ist Rot: John Locke und George Berkeley über abstrakte Ideen und Kants logischer Abstraktionismus. Kant-Studien 103 (1):25-46.
    The paper discusses Berkeley's classical critique of Locke's theory of generating concepts by abstraction, rebuts it, and shows that endorses Lockean abstractionism concerning the formation of empirical concepts.
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  50.  13
    Peter Sullivan (2005). What is Wrong with Abstraction? Philosophia Mathematica 13 (2):187--93.
    We correct a misunderstanding by Hale and Wright of an objection we raised earlier to their abstractionist programme for rehabilitating logicism in the foundations of mathematics.
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