Search results for 'Absurd (Philosophy) in literature' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Joseph McBride (1992). Albert Camus: Philosopher and Littérateur. St. Martin's Press.score: 456.0
    Marking a major new reassessment of Camus' writing, this book investigates the nature and philosophical origins of Camus' thinking on "authenticity" and "the absurd" as these motions are expressed in "The Myth of Sisyphus" and "The Outsider", showing these books to be the product not only of a literary figure, but of a genuine philosopher as well. Moreover, the author provides a complete English-language translation of Camus' "Metaphysique Chretienne et Neoplatonisme" and underlines the importance of this study for the (...)
     
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  2. Stephen W. Potts (1982). From Here to Absurdity: The Moral Battlefields of Joseph Heller. Borgo Press.score: 428.0
     
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  3. Lev Braun (1974). Witness of Decline. Rutherford [N.J.]Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.score: 408.0
     
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  4. V. I͡U Novikova (2005). Semantika Absurda. Kubanskiĭ Gos. Universitet.score: 408.0
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  5. Margaret Simonton (1996). Nabokov, Vian, and Kharms: From Solipsism to Dialogue. P. Lang.score: 408.0
     
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  6. Adnan Mahmutović (2012). Ways of Being Free: Authenticity and Community in Selected Works of Rushdie, Ondaatje, and Okri. Rodopi.score: 342.0
    Ways of Being Free: Introduction -- War Is Everything's Father: History and Death as Causes of Existential Angst -- Introduction: Causes of Existential Angst -- Change and Changelessness in Midnight's Children -- The Road of Existential Struggle in The Famished Road -- History and the "Nervous Condition" in The English Patient -- Death as a Drive to Meaningful Existence in Midnight's Children -- Becoming Dead-to-the-World in The English Patient -- Ideological Re-appropriation through Death in The Famished Road -- Authenticity -- (...)
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  7. Ben Woodard (2010). Mad Speculation and Absolute Inhumanism: Lovecraft, Ligotti, and the Weirding of Philosophy. Continent 1 (1):3-13.score: 258.0
    continent. 1.1 (2011): 3-13. / 0/ – Introduction I want to propose, as a trajectory into the philosophically weird, an absurd theoretical claim and pursue it, or perhaps more accurately, construct it as I point to it, collecting the ground work behind me like the Perpetual Train from China Mieville's Iron Council which puts down track as it moves reclaiming it along the way. The strange trajectory is the following: Kant's critical philosophy and much of continental philosophy which has (...)
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  8. Michael Anthony Istvan (2013). Gould Talking Past Dawkins on the Unit of Selection Issue. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C 44 (3):327-335.score: 240.0
    My general aim is to clarify the foundational difference between Stephen Jay Gould and Richard Dawkins concerning what biological entities are the units of selection in the process of evolution by natural selection. First, I recapitulate Gould’s central objection to Dawkins’s view that genes are the exclusive units of selection. According to Gould, it is absurd for Dawkins to think that genes are the exclusive units of selection when, after all, genes are not the exclusive interactors: those agents directly (...)
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  9. Alan H. Goldman (2001). Practical Rules: When We Need Them and When We Don't. Cambridge University Press.score: 216.0
    Rules proliferate; some are kept with a bureaucratic stringency bordering on the absurd, while others are manipulated and ignored in ways that injure our sense of justice. Under what conditions should we make exceptions to rules, and when should they be followed despite particular circumstances? The two dominant models in the current literature on rules are the particularist account and that which sees the application of rules as normative. Taking a position that falls between these two extremes, Alan (...)
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  10. David P. Barash (2013). Why Thomas is so Hardy: Literature Inspired by Evolution to Make Sense of the Senseless. Biology and Philosophy 28 (1):115-123.score: 216.0
    Although existentialism and evolutionary biology might appear to be polar opposites, with the former denying a role for “human nature” and the latter emphasizing it, there are some unrecognized parallels. One in particular is that both disciplines assume that human life is not inherently meaningful, such that any attribution of meaning must arise from human actions. The present article traces some of this intellectual correspondence in the realm of literature.
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  11. Frank Kermode (2000). The Sense of an Ending: Studies in the Theory of Fiction: With a New Epilogue. Oxford University Press.score: 204.0
    Frank Kermode is one of our most distinguished and beloved critics of English literature. Here, he contributes a new epilogue to his collection of classic lectures on the relationship of fiction to age-old concepts of apocalyptic chaos and crisis. Prompted by the approach of the millennium, he revisits the book which brings his highly concentrated insights to bear on some of the most unyielding philosophical and aesthetic enigmas. Examining the works of writers from Plato to William Burrows, Kermode shows (...)
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  12. James Andow (2014). Intuitions, Disagreement and Referential Pluralism. Review of Philosophy and Psychology 5 (2):223-239.score: 204.0
    Mallon, Machery, Nichols and Stich (Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79: 332–356, 2009) argue that the use of intuitions in the philosophy of reference is problematic as recent studies show intuitions about reference vary both within and between cultures. I use some ideas from the recent literature on disagreement and truth relativism to shed light on the debate concerning the appropriate reaction to these studies. Mallon et al. argue that variation is problematic because if one tries to use intuitions which (...)
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  13. Gary J. Shipley & Nicola Masciandaro (2012). Open Commentary to Eugene Thacker's" Cosmic Pessimism". Continent 2 (2):76-81.score: 192.0
    continent. 2.2 (2012): 76–81 Comments on Eugene Thacker’s “Cosmic Pessimism” Nicola Masciandaro Anything you look forward to will destroy you, as it already has. —Vernon Howard In pessimism, the first axiom is a long, low, funereal sigh. The cosmicity of the sigh resides in its profound negative singularity. Moving via endless auto-releasement, it achieves the remote. “ Oltre la spera che piú larga gira / passa ’l sospiro ch’esce del mio core ” [Beyond the sphere that circles widest / penetrates (...)
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  14. Nabil I. Al-Najjar & Jonathan Weinstein (2009). The Ambiguity Aversion Literature: A Critical Assessment. Economics and Philosophy 25 (3):249-284.score: 180.0
    We provide a critical assessment of the ambiguity aversion literature, which we characterize in terms of the view that Ellsberg choices are rational responses to ambiguity, to be explained by relaxing Savage's Sure-Thing principle and adding an ambiguity-aversion postulate. First, admitting Ellsberg choices as rational leads to behaviour, such as sensitivity to irrelevant sunk cost, or aversion to information, which most economists would consider absurd or irrational. Second, we argue that the mathematical objects referred to as in the (...)
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  15. David Robjant (forthcoming). What Use is Literature to Political Philosophy? Or: The Funny Thing About Socrates’ Nose. Philosophy and Literature.score: 166.0
    Readers of Plato’s Republic wildly underestimate Thrasymachus’ challenge if they treat it as a claim about ‘justice’, and in grasping Plato’s response it is dangerous to confuse his aims and methods with those agreed on by his characters. Plato’s service to political philosophy is not merely literary, but comic. Plato’s drama exposes and ridicules a generalisation from Thrasymachus' own moral psychology at the heart of Thrasymachus’ political vision. Insight and comedy are born together when a pig who theorises a city (...)
     
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  16. Aaron Wilson (2013). Reid's Account of Judgment and Missing Fourth Kind of Conception. Journal of Scottish Philosophy 11 (1):25-40.score: 120.0
    According to Thomas Reid, every act of mind is accompanied by a conception of its object. For instance, he holds that the thing one conceives in an act of perception is always an individual thing that exists, and that the thing one conceives in an act of judgment is the thing expressed by the proposition judged. However, Reid never is clear about what kind of thing is expressed by a proposition; neither is it clear from the existing literature on (...)
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  17. Margaret A. Simons (2006). Beauvoir's Early Philosophy: 1926-27. In Simone de Beauvoir, Barbara Klaw, Margaret A. Simons & Marybeth Timmermann (eds.), Diary of a Philosophy Student, Volume 1: 1926-27. University of Illinois Press. 29-50.score: 90.0
    For philosophers familiar with the traditional interpretation of Simone de Beauvoir as a literary writer and philosophical follower of Jean-Paul Sartre, Beauvoir’s 1926-27 student diary is a revelation. Inviting an exploration of Beauvoir’s early philosophy foreclosed by the traditional interpretation, the student diary reveals Beauvoir’s early dedication to becoming a philosopher and her early formulation of philosophical problems and positions usually attributed to Sartre’s influence, such as the central problem of “the opposition of self and other,” years before she first (...)
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  18. Benjamin La Farge (2004). Comedy's Intention. Philosophy and Literature 28 (1):118-136.score: 34.0
    : I begin by asking, What is the underlying dynamic of comedy, its generic intention? I answer by testing each of several classic theories (plus two popular cliches) against a single, brief scene in Oscar Wilde's The Importance of Being Earnest. Each of the first six sections subjects that scene to one of seven theories, in each case singling out an idea that seems convincing and discarding other ideas that do not. Illogical Logic explains the various means by which the (...)
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