Search results for 'Act' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Adjr Act (forthcoming). 75B of the TP Act (Gleeson CJ, Gummow, Hayne, Heydon, Cren-Nan JJ). Migration-Refugee Status-Fear of" Serious Harm" In VBAO V MIMIA [2006] HCA 60;(14 December 2006) the High Court Concluded That the Reference to the Threat of Serious. [REVIEW] Ethos.score: 120.0
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  2. Trade Practises Act (forthcoming). ACT Administrative Appeals Tribunal Decisions. Ethos.score: 120.0
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  3. An Act (1983). The Louisiana Creationism Act (1981). In J. Peter Zetterberg (ed.), Evolution Versus Creationism: The Public Education Controversy. Oryx Press. 394.score: 120.0
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  4. Alex Rajczi (2011). The Argument From Self-Creation: A Refutation of Act-Consequentialism and a Defense of Moral Options. American Philosophical Quarterly 48 (4):315.score: 18.0
    The standard form of act-consequentialism requires us to perform the action with the best consequences; it allows choice between moral options only on those rare occasions (...)when several actions produce equally good results. This paper argues for moral options and thus against act-consequentialism. The argument turns on the insight that some valuable things cannot exist unless our moral system allows options. One such thing is the opportunity for individuals to enact plans for their life from among alternatives. Because planning ones life has value, and because it requires moral options, a world governed by a moral system that admits of options is better than one governed by act-consequentialism. The paper argues that these facts entail that morality admits of a significant number of moral options; act-consequentialism is false. (shrink)
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  5. Jacques P. Dubucs & Wioletta Miśkiewicz (2009). Logic, Act and Product. In Giuseppe Primiero (ed.), Knowledge and Judgment. Springer Verlag.score: 18.0
    Logic and psychology overlap in judgment, inference and proof. The problems raised by this commonality are notoriously difficult, both from a historical and from a philosophical point (...)
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  6. Miriam F. Weismann (2009). The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act: The Failure of the Self-Regulatory Model of Corporate Governance in the Global Business Environment. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 88 (4):615 - 661.score: 18.0
    The American regulatory model of corporate governance rests on the theory of self-regulation asthe most effective and efficient means to achieve corporate self-restraint in the (...)
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  7. Keith Hossack (2003). Consciousness in Act and Action. Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 2 (3):187-203.score: 18.0
    This paper develops an account of consciousness in action. Both consciousness and action are related to knowledge. A voluntary action is defined as a volition, or something (...)
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  8. Berent Enç (2003). How We Act: Causes, Reasons, and Intentions. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    Talking about action comes easily to us. We quickly make distinctions between voluntary and non-voluntary actions; we think we can tell what intentions are; we are (...)confident about evaluating reasons offered in rational justification of action. Berent Enc provides a philosopher's sustained examination of these issues: he portrays action as belonging to the causal order of events in nature, a theory from which new and surprising accounts of intention and voluntary action emerge. Philosophers and cognitive scientists alike will find How We Act a provocative and enlightening read. (shrink)
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  9. Maria van der Schaar (2011). The Cognitive Act and the First-Person Perspective: an Epistemology for Constructive Type Theory. [REVIEW] Synthese 180 (3):391-417.score: 18.0
    The notion of cognitive act is of importance for an epistemology that is apt for constructive type theory, and for epistemology in general. Instead of taking knowledge (...)
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  10. Michael S. Moore (1993). Act and Crime: The Philosophy of Action and its Implications for Criminal Law. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    This work provides, for the first time, a unified account of the theory of action presupposed by both British and American criminal law and its underlying morality. (...)
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  11. M. M. Bakhtin (1993). Toward a Philosophy of the Act. University of Texas Press.score: 18.0
    Rescued in 1972 from a storeroom in which rats and seeping water had severely damaged the fifty-year-old manuscript, this text is the earliest major work (1919 (...)-1921) of the great Russian philosopher M. M. Bakhtin. Toward a Philosophy of the Act contains the first occurrences of themes that occupied Bakhtin throughout his long career. The topics of authoring, responsibility, self and other, the moral significance of "outsideness," participatory thinking, the implications for the individual subject of having "no-alibi in existence," the difference between the world as experienced in actions and the world as represented in discourse--all are broached here in the heat of discovery. This is the "heart of the heart" of Bakhtin, the center of the dialogue between being and language, the world and mind, "the given" and "the created" that forms the core of Bakhtin's distinctive dialogism. A special feature of this work is Bakhtin's struggle with the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Put very simply, this text is an attempt to go beyond Kant's formulation of the ethical imperative. Toward a Philosophy of the Act will be important for scholars across the humanities as they grapple with the increasingly vexed relationship between aesthetics and ethics. (shrink)
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  12. Thomas L. Carson, Mary Ellen Verdu & Richard E. Wokutch (2008). Whistle-Blowing for Profit: An Ethical Analysis of the Federal False Claims Act. [REVIEW] Journal of Business Ethics 77 (3):361 - 376.score: 18.0
    This paper focuses on the 1986 Amendments to the False Claims Act of 1863, which offers whistle-blowers financial rewards for disclosing fraud committed against the U.S (...). government. This law provides an opportunity to examine underlying assumptions about the morality of whistle-blowing and to consider the merits of increased reliance on whistle-blowing to protect the public interest. The law seems open to a number of moral objections, most notably that it exerts a morally corrupting influence on whistle-blowers. We answer these objections and argue that the law is not objectionable on these grounds. Since there are no compelling moral objections to the law, it is appropriate and acceptable to judge the law in terms of its economic costs and benefits. We assess the most salient of these and conclude that the benefits outweigh the costs. We suggest that a mechanism similar to the Act should be considered for protecting stockholdersinterests in the private sector. We conclude by making several proposals for improving the existing legislation. (shrink)
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  13. Johan E. Gustafsson (2014). Combinative Consequentialism and the Problem of Act Versions. Philosophical Studies 167 (3):585–596.score: 18.0
    In the 1960s, Lars Bergström and Hector-Neri Castañeda noticed a problem with alternative acts and consequentialism. The source of the problem is that some performable acts (...) are versions of other performable acts and the versions need not have the same consequences as the originals. Therefore, if all performable acts are among the agents alternatives, act consequentialism yields deontic paradoxes. A standard response is to restrict the application of act consequentialism to certain relevant alternative sets. Many proposals are based on some variation of maximalism, that is, the view that act consequentialism should only be applied to maximally specific acts. In this paper, I argue that maximalism cannot yield the right prescriptions in some cases where one can either (i) form at once the intention to do an immediate act and form at a later time the intention to do a succeeding act or (ii) form at once the intention to do both acts and where the consequences of (i) and (ii) differ in value. Maximalism also violates normative invariance, that is, the condition that if an act is performable in a situation, then the normative status of the act does not depend on what acts are performed in the situation. Instead of maximalism, I propose that the relevant alternatives should be the exhaustive combinations of acts the agent can jointly perform without performing any other act in the situation. In this way, one avoids the problem of act versions without violating normative invariance. Another advantage is that one can adequately differentiate between possibilities like (i) and (ii). (shrink)
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  14. Thomas Taro Lennerfors (2007). The Transformation of Transparencyon the Act on Public Procurement and the Right to Appeal in the Context of the War on Corruption. Journal of Business Ethics 73 (4):381 - 390.score: 18.0
    This article discusses the alleged anti-corruption effects of procurement reforms by presenting the European Act on Public Procurement and the increasing number of appeals filed by (...)suppliers due to perceived misevaluations of tenders and perceived impairments of transparency. The delays and costs that arise from this right to appeal are studied in the Swedish context with the aim of contributing to the debate on corruption in two ways. First, instead of using the modern definition of corruption, the ancient definition is introduced to explain anti-corruption efforts, focusing on corruption as deviations from a pristine standard as opposed to corruption as the abuse of public power for private gain. Second, it will be argued that the fight against corruption in the practical implementation of the European Act on Public Procurement jeopardizes efficiency and might devaluate competence. However, striving for the total elimination of corruptionan evil that has to be fought disregarding the consequencesis integral in the war against it. (shrink)
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  15. Susan Dimock (2012). Intoxication and the Act/Control/Agency Requirement. Criminal Law and Philosophy 6 (3):341-362.score: 18.0
    Doug Husak has argued, persuasively I think, that there is no literalact requirementin Anglo-American law. I begin by reviewing Husaks reasons for rejecting the (...) act requirement, and provide additional reasons to think he is right to do so. But Husaks alternative, thecontrol condition’, I argue, is inadequate. The control requirement is falsified by the widespread practice of holding extremely intoxicated offenders liable for criminal conduct they engage in even if they lack control over their conduct at the time of the offense, and even if they are acting involuntarily. I provide examples from Canadian, US and German law to flesh out our legal practices with respect to intoxicated offenders. I then argue that, at least with respect to one class of intoxicated offendersthose known asgrand schemers’, who plan their criminal offending prior to rendering themselves incapable of voluntary control over their conductwe are morally justified in imposing liability. I then propose an alternative to both the act and control requirements: what I call theagency requirement’. I argue that our law does and should impose liability for conduct that is expressive of or constitutive of the defendants practically rational agency. Adopting an agency view allows us to expand our focus from just the moment of the offense to temporally extended instances of agency, such as is involved in planned offending by grand schemers. (shrink)
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  16. Berent Enc (2006). How We Act: Causes, Reasons, and Intentions. Clarendon Press.score: 18.0
    How We Act presents a compelling picture of human action as part of the natural causal order. Berent Enç eschews any appeal to special capacities supposedly unique (...)
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  17. Peter West-Oram (2013). Freedom of Conscience and Health Care in the United States of America: The Conflict Between Public Health and Religious Liberty in the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 21 (3):237-247.score: 18.0
    The recent confirmation of the constitutionality of the Obama administrations Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (PPACA) by the US Supreme Court has brought to the (...)fore long-standing debates over individual liberty and religious freedom. Advocates of personal liberty are often critical, particularly in the USA, of public health measures which they deem to be overly restrictive of personal choice. In addition to the alleged restrictions of individual freedom of choice when it comes to the question of whether or not to purchase health insurance, opponents to the PPACA also argue that certain requirements of the Act violate the right to freedom of conscience by mandating support for services deemed immoral by religious groups. These issues continue the long running debate surrounding the demands of religious groups for special consideration in the realm of health care provision. In this paper I examine the requirements of the PPACA, and the impacts that religious, and other ideological, exemptions can have on public health, and argue that the exemptions provided for by the PPACA do not in fact impose unreasonable restrictions on religious freedom, but rather concede too much and in so doing endanger public health and some important individual liberties. (shrink)
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  18. Nicola Barker (2006). Sex and the Civil Partnership Act: the Future of (Non) Conjugality? [REVIEW] Feminist Legal Studies 14 (2):241-259.score: 18.0
    This article considers the transgressive and transformative possibilities in the sexual silences of the U.K.’s Civil Partnership Act 2004. The absence of a consummation requirement and (...) adultery as a specific ground of dissolution do open up some possibilities but are not unproblematic. These issues are explored in the context of the England and Wales Law Commissions apparentreturnto a conjugal model in its forthcoming consultation on cohabitation. It is concluded that though the Act may open up possibilities for expanding the legal recognition of relationships beyond those that are sexual, this raises concerns about the further privatisation of care as well as increased state intervention in relationships. Instead, I argue that the purpose and function of relationship recognition should be deconstructed and separated from ideology and romantic mythology about what families and relationships are and should be. If it does wed itself so closely to the conjugal marriage model in the consultation document, the Law Commission will miss a valuable opportunity to ask important questions about the purpose and function of relationship recognition. (shrink)
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  19. Wim Vandekerckhove, Jos Leys & Dirk Van Braeckel (2008). A Speech-Act Model for Talking to Management. Building a Framework for Evaluating Communication Within the Sri Engagement Process. Journal of Business Ethics 82 (1):77 - 91.score: 18.0
    Socially Responsible Investment (SRI) has grown considerably over the past three decades. One form of SRI, engagement-SRI, is today by far the most practiced form of (...)SRI (in assets managed) and has the potential to mainstream SRI even further. However, lack of formalized engagement procedures and evaluation tools leave the engagement practice too opaque for such a mainstreaming. This article can be considered as a first step in the development of a standard for the engagement practice. By developing an engagement heuristic, this article offers a more transparent engagement dialog. Drawing on Stevensons and Austins speech-act theories, this article develops a classification of managements responses to the signaling of allegations and controversies on two dimensions: a factual dimension concerning (dis)agreements on factual claims and an attitudinal dimension concerning (dis)agreements on responsibilities, values, and norms. On the basis of the distinctions this article develops, the authors provide for a synoptic table and offer a next-step heuristic for the engagement process that started with signaling a concern to management. The article uses an engagement logic that, while keeping the exit option for the investor open, allows management to address signaled concerns without having to let down or to opt out at the first setback in the dialog process between investor and investee corporation. (shrink)
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  20. FransH Eemeren & Rob Grootendorst (1989). Speech Act Conditions as Tools for Reconstructing Argumentative Discourse. Argumentation 3 (4):367-383.score: 18.0
    According to the pragma-dialectical approach to argumentation, for analysing argumentative discourse, a normative reconstruction is required which encompasses four kinds of transformations. It is explained in (...)this paper how speech act conditions can play a part in carrying out such a reconstruction. It is argued that integrating Searlean insights concerning speech acts with Gricean insights concerning conversational maxims can provide us with the necessary tools. For this, the standard theory of speech acts has to be amended in several respects and the conversational maxims have to be translated into speech act conditions. Making use of the rules for communication thus arrived at, and starting from the distribution of speech acts in a critical discussion as specified in the pragma-dialectical model, it is then demonstrated how indirect speech acts are to be transformed when reconstructing argumentative discourse. (shrink)
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  21. Alex Fielding (2008). Yahoo? Reining in the Wild West with the Alien Tort Claims Act. Human Rights Review 9 (4):513-523.score: 18.0
    In the wake of globalisation, we have witnessed the rise of the transnational corporationpowerful, new players in an international human rights system ill-equipped to handle the (...) challenge. Despite the best efforts of the United Nations, international treaties and human rights lawyers the world over, there is simply no mandatory international code of corporate conduct targeting human rights practices. Enter the Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA), a once-obscure U.S. statute that provides a private cause of action for violations of international human rights law committed by governmental and non-governmental actors. This paper will examine recent ATCA jurisprudence, the landmark Unocal settlement, and the ATCAs role in reining in Yahoo! Inc. for supplying evidence used to convict Chinese dissidents Wang Xiaoning and Shi Tao. (shrink)
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  22. Neva Hassanein (2011). Matters of Scale and the Politics of the Food Safety Modernization Act. Agriculture and Human Values 28 (4):577-581.score: 18.0
    Signed into law in early 2011, the Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA) marked the first major overhaul of the United Statesregulatory system for food safety since (...)
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  23. Jacques Mœschler (1992). The Pragmatic Aspects of Linguistic Negation: Speech Act, Argumentation and Pragmatic Inference. [REVIEW] Argumentation 6 (1):51-76.score: 18.0
    This paper is an attempt to give a general explanation of pragmatic aspects of linguistic negation. After a brief survey of classical accounts of negation within pragmatic (...)
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  24. Kelly Richmond Pope & Chih-Chen Lee (2013). Could the DoddFrank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010 Be Helpful in Reforming Corporate America? An Investigation on Financial Bounties and Whistle-Blowing Behaviors in the Private Sector. Journal of Business Ethics 112 (4):597-607.score: 18.0
    The purpose of this study is to investigate whether the availability of financial bounties and anonymous reporting channels impact individualsgeneral reporting intentions of questionable acts and (...)
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  25. Jonathan Francis Bennett (1995). The Act Itself. Oxford University Press.score: 18.0
    In this major new book, the internationally renowned thinker Jonathan Bennett offers a deeper understanding of what is going on in our own moral thoughts about human (...)
     
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  26. Andrew Botterell (2012). Understanding the Voluntary Act Principle. In François Tanguay-Renaud & James Stribopoulos (eds.), Rethinking Criminal Law Theory: New Canadian Perspectives in the Philosophy of Domestic, Transnational, and International Criminal Law. Hart Publishing.score: 18.0
    In broad outline, the chapter proceeds as follows. As indicated above, the Voluntary Act Principle has two components. The first part, the act component, claims that criminal (...)
     
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  27. Mary Dominick (2008). The US Alien Tort Claims Act of 1789, the US Torture Victims Protection Act of 1992, and the Gongadze Case: A Right Without Adequate Remedy? [REVIEW] Human Rights Review 9 (4):545-547.score: 18.0
    The US 1992 Torture Victims Protection Act (TVPA) strengthens the reach of the 1789 Alien Tort Claims Act (ATCA) to US citizens alleging claims of torture and/ (...)or extrajudicial killings that occur abroad, but only if the plaintiffs were US citizens at the time of the criminal acts. Should the later-in-time statute, which gives effect to the United Nations Convention against Torture and extends remedies under the ATCA, be amended to apply to those given political asylum in this country from the moment of their entry? Is not the limbo status of victims given haven in the USA but not automatic citizenship, victims who rightly need resolution of brutal facts which occasioned rupture with their country of origin, a situation that cries for more precise remedy? This note explores this issue as raised by the case of Myroslava Gongadze, the widow of slain political journalist Georghy Gongadze in the Ukraine in September 2000. Only three of the perpetrators, policemen who say they followed orders, were put on trial in 20072008. Those who allegedly gave the orders for the killing continue to evade justice. (shrink)
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  28. David Gurnham (2008). Reader, I Detained Him Under the Mental Health Act”: A Literary Response to Professor Fennell's Best Interests and Treatment for Mental Disorder. [REVIEW] Health Care Analysis 16 (3):268-278.score: 18.0
    This is a response to Professor Fennell's paper on the recent influence and impact of the best interests test on the treatment of patients detained under (...)the Mental Health Act 1983 (MHA) for mental disorder. I discuss two points of general ethical significance raised by Professor Fennell. Firstly, I consider his argument on the breadth of the best interests test, incorporating as it does factors considerably wider than those of medical justifications and the risk of harm. Secondly, I discuss his contention that the apparent permeability of the line between the interests of the patient and the interests of society is something to be concerned about in itself. Since the overarching theme of the paper is the proper place of social and cultural values, my reponse considers the implications of Fennell's arguments in the light of Charlotte Brontë's novelJane Eyre’, which, through the character of Bertha Mason (the infamousmad woman in the attic’) provides a provocative study of the relationship between mental disorder and society. (shrink)
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  29. George Herbert Mead (1938). The Philosophy of the Act. Chicago, Ill.,The University of Chicago Press.score: 18.0
    Introduction.--Biographical notes.--General analysis of knowledge and the act.--Perceptual and manipulatory phases of the act.--Cosmology.--Value and the act.--Supplementary essays.
     
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  30. Paul Saka (2011). The Act of Quotation. In Elke Brendel (ed.), Understanding Quotation. De Gruyter Mouton.score: 18.0
    I focus on one approach to understanding quotation, the identity theory; I delineate varieties thereof; and I cite some considerations for favoring a speech-act version. Along (...)the way we shall see how the study of quotation can illuminate the general conflict between speech-act semantics and formal semantics, and we shall see fresh arguments for insisting that the mechanism of quotation is referentially indeterminate. (shrink)
     
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  31. Moritz Cordes & Friedrich Reinmuth, A Speech Act Calculus. A Pragmatised Natural Deduction Calculus and its Meta-Theory.score: 15.0
    Building on the work of Peter Hinst and Geo Siegwart, we develop a pragmatised natural deduction calculus, i.e. a natural deduction calculus that incorporates illocutionary operators (...)at the formal level, and prove its adequacy. In contrast to other linear calculi of natural deduction, derivations in this calculus are sequences of object-language sentences which do not require graphical or other means of commentary in order to keep track of assumptions or to indicate subproofs. (Translation of our German paper "Ein Redehandlungskalkül. Ein pragmatisierter Kalkül des natürlichen Schließens nebst Metatheorie"; online available at http://philpapers.org/rec/CORERE.). (shrink)
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  32. John Protevi & Roger Pippin (2008). Affect, Agency and Responsibility: The Act of Killing in the Age of Cyborgs. [REVIEW] Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 7 (3):405-413.score: 15.0
    Draft 13 April 2007. Under review at Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences.
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  33. Alex Gillespie (2005). G.H. Mead: Theorist of the Social Act. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 35 (1):19–39.score: 15.0
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  34. K. A. Henderson, R. A. Spinello & T. A. Lipinski (2007). Prudent Policy?: Reassessing the Digital Millennium Copyright Act. Acm Sigcas Computers and Society 37 (2):25-40.score: 15.0
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  35. Edith Stein (2009). Potency and Act: Studies Toward a Philosophy of Being. Ics Publications.score: 15.0
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  36. Sanford S. Levy (1990). Moral Education: An Act-Utilitarian View1. Studies in Philosophy and Education 10 (2):165-174.score: 15.0
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  37. Ross L. Pepper & Louis M. Herman (1970). Decay and Interference Effects in the Short-Term Retention of a Discrete Motor Act. Journal of Experimental Psychology 83 (2p2):1.score: 15.0
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  38. T. M. Pope (2012). Legal Briefing: the New Patient Self-Determination Act. Journal of Clinical Ethics 24 (2):156-167.score: 15.0
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  39. Miriam F. Weismann, Christopher A. Buscaglia & Jason Peterson (forthcoming). The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act: Why It Fails to Deter Bribery as a Global Market Entry Strategy. Journal of Business Ethics.score: 15.0
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  40. Douglas Browning (1964). Act and Agent. [Coral Gables, Fla.,University of Miami Press.score: 15.0
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  41. Mats J. Hansson (1991). Understanding an Act of God: An Essay in Philosophical Theology. Distributed by Almqvist & Wiksell International.score: 15.0
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  42. William E. Murnion (1973). The Meaning of Act in Understanding: A Study of the Thomistic Notion of Vital Act and Thomas Aquinas's Original Teaching. Catholic Book Agency.score: 15.0
  43. Paul E. Tibbetts (1974). Mead's Theory of the Act and Perception: Some Empirical Confirmations. Personalist 55:115-138.score: 15.0
     
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  44. Rhiannon Weaver (2008). Parameters, Predictions, and Evidence in Computational Modeling: A Statistical View Informed by ACTR. Cognitive Science 32 (8):1349-1375.score: 15.0
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  45. Allan Bernard Wolter (2000). John Duns Scotus: A Treatise on Potency and Act: Questions on the Metaphysics of Aristotle, Book Ix. Franciscan Institute.score: 15.0
  46. Savas L. Tsohatzidis (ed.) (1994). Foundations of Speech Act Theory: Philosophical and Linguistic Perspectives. Routledge.score: 14.0
    Foundations of Speech Act Theory investigates the importance of speech act theory to the problem of meaning in linguistics and philosophy. The papers in this volume, written (...)
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  47. John Turri (2013). Pyrrhonian Skepticism Meets Speech-Act Theory. International Journal for the Study of Skepticism 2 (2):83-98.score: 14.0
    This paper applies speech-act theory to craft a new response to Pyrrhonian skepticism and diagnose its appeal. Carefully distinguishing between different levels of language-use and noting (...) their interrelations can help us identify a subtle mistake in a key Pyrrhonian argument. (shrink)
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  48. Peter Singer (1972). Is Act-Utilitarianism Self-Defeating? Philosophical Review 81 (1):94-104.score: 12.0
    In his "consequences of utilitarianism", D. H. Hodgson argues that to act on the principle of act-Utilitarianism would have disastrous consequences, And that this principle must (...)therefore be rejected. I attempt to refute his argument. The debate centers on whether there can be an act-Utilitarian justification for telling the truth and keeping promises. (shrink)
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  49. Susanna Schellenberg (2010). Perceptual Experience and the Capacity to Act. In N. Gangopadhay, M. Madary & F. Spicer (eds.), Perception, Action, and Consciousness. Oxford University Press. 145.score: 12.0
    This paper develops and defends the capacity view, that is, the view that the ability to perceive the perspective-independent or intrinsic properties of objects depends on (...)the perceivers capacity to act. More specifically, I argue that self-location and spatial know-how are jointly necessary to perceive the intrinsic spatial properties of objects. Representing ones location allows one to abstract from ones particular vantage point to perceive the perspective-independent properties of objects. Spatial know-how allows one to perceive objects as the kind of things that are perceivable from points of view other than ones own and thus to perceive them as three-dimensional space occupiers. (shrink)
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  50. Randolph Clarke (2009). Dispositions, Abilities to Act, and Free Will: The New Dispositionalism. Mind 118 (470):323-351.score: 12.0
    This paper examines recent attempts to revive a classic compatibilist position on free will, according to which having an ability to perform a certain action is having (...)
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