Search results for 'Act (Philosophy History' (try it on Scholar)

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  1.  12
    Michael Rosen (2011). The History of Ideas as Philosophy and History. History of Political Thought 32 (4):691-720.
    This article argues for a conception of the history of ideas that treats philosophy historically while avoiding sociological reductionism. On the view presented here, philosophical problems characteristically arise from a conflict of commitments, at least some of which have roots in wider forms of life and ways of seeing the world. In bringing such 'doxa' to our attention, the history of ideas, it is argued, plays a role that is both genuinely historical and, at the same time, contributes (...)
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  2.  56
    Thomas Pink & M. W. F. Stone (eds.) (2003). The Will and Human Action: From Antiquity to the Present Day. Routledge.
    What is the will? And what is its relation to human action? Throughout history, philosophers have been fascinated by the idea of "the will": the source of the drive that motivates human beings to act. However, there has never been a clear consensus as to what the will is and how it relates to human action. Some philosophers have taken the will to be based firmly in reason and rational choice, and some have seen it as purely self-determined. Others (...)
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  3.  3
    R. Peters (2014). The Actuality of Gentile's Philosophy of History. Collingwood and British Idealism Studies 20 (1-2):167-203.
    This essay reconstructs Gentile's conception of history as the product of the eternal act of thinking. Peters charts the development of this distinctive position, presenting it as the product of a sustained attempt to unite past and present, fact and value, thought and action within a single theory. He argues that, despite a number of weaknesses that Gentile neglected to consider and the regrettable, dubious extremes to which he extended his theory in the Fascist period, it deserves greater attention (...)
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  4. Onora O'Neill (1989). Constructions of Reason: Explorations of Kant's Practical Philosophy. Cambridge University Press.
    Two centuries after they were published, Kant's ethical writings are as much admired and imitated as they have ever been, yet serious and long-standing accusations of internal incoherence remain unresolved. Onora O'Neill traces the alleged incoherences to attempts to assimilate Kant's ethical writings to modern conceptions of rationality, action and rights. When the temptation to assimilate is resisted, a strikingly different and more cohesive account of reason and morality emerges. Kant offers a "constructivist" vindication of reason and a moral vision (...)
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  5.  42
    Theodore R. Schatzki (2010). The Timespace of Human Activity: On Performance, Society, and History as Indeterminate Teleological Events. Lexington Books.
    The Timespace of Human Activity shows that a concept of activity timespace drawn from the work of Martin Heidegger Provides new insights into the nature of ...
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  6.  9
    David L. Marshall (2013). The Implications of Robert Brandom's Inferentialism for Intellectual History. History and Theory 52 (1):1-31.
    Quentin Skinner’s appropriation of speech act theory for intellectual history has been extremely influential. Even as the model continues to be important for historians, however, philosophers now regard the original speech act theory paradigm as dated. Are there more recent initiatives that might reignite theoretical work in this area? This article argues that the inferentialism of Robert Brandom is one of the most interesting contemporary philosophical projects with historical implications. It shows how Brandom’s work emerged out of the broad (...)
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  7. Thomas Gil (2010). Actions, Normativity, and History. Wehrhahn.
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  8.  20
    Ido Geiger (2007). The Founding Act of Modern Ethical Life: Hegel's Critique of Kant's Moral and Political Philosophy. Stanford University Press.
    This book argues that an essential part of Hegel's historical-political thinking has escaped the notice of its interpreters. It is well known that Hegel conceives of history as the gradual progress of rational thought and of forms of political life. But he is usually thought to place himself at the end of this process—his philosophical end is to give a rational account of the end of this process, namely, modern ethical life. This overlooks the question of how a new (...)
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  9.  26
    Maximilian de Gaynesford (ed.) (2011). Agents and Their Actions. Wiley-Blackwell.
    Reflecting a recent flourishing of creative thinking in the field, _Agents and Their Actions_ presents seven newly commissioned essays by leading international philosophers that highlight the most recent debates in the philosophy of action Features seven internationally significant authors, including new work by two of philosophy's ‘super stars’, John McDowell and Joseph Raz Presents the first clear indication of how John McDowell is extending his path-breaking work on intentionality and perceptual experience towards an account of action and agency Covers all (...)
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  10.  14
    Mary B. Hesse (1961). Forces and Fields: The Concept of Action at a Distance in the History of Physics. Dover Publications.
    This history of physics focuses on the question, "How do bodies act on one another across space?" The variety of answers illustrates the function of fundamental analogies or models in physics as well as the role of so-called unobservable entities. Forces and Fields presents an in-depth look at the science of ancient Greece, and it examines the influence of antique philosophy on seventeenth-century thought. Additional topics embrace many elements of modern physics--the empirical basis of quantum mechanics, wave-particle duality and (...)
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  11.  17
    Hent de Vries (1999). Philosophy and the Turn to Religion. Johns Hopkins University Press.
    If religion once seemed to have played out its role in the intellectual and political history of Western secular modernity, it has now returned with a vengeance. In this engaging study, Hent de Vries argues that a turn to religion discernible in recent philosophy anticipates and accompanies this development in the contemporary world. Though the book reaches back to Immanuel Kant, Martin Heidegger, and earlier, it takes its inspiration from the tradition of French phenomenology, notably Emmanuel Levinas, Jean-Luc Marion, (...)
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  12. Barry Smith (1990). Towards a History of Speech Act Theory. In Armin Burkhardt (ed.), (ed.), Speech Acts, Meanings and Intentions. Critical Approaches to the Philosophy of John R. Searle, 29–61. De Gruyter
    That uses of language not only can, but even normally do have the character of actions was a fact largely unrealised by those engaged in the study of language before the present century, at least in the sense that there was lacking any attempt to come to terms systematically with the action-theoretic peculiarities of language use. Where the action-character of linguistic phenomena was acknowledged, it was normally regarded as a peripheral matter, relating to derivative or nonstandard aspects of language which (...)
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  13.  46
    Hanne Andersen, History and Philosophy of Modern Epidemiology.
    Epidemiological studies of chronic diseases began around the mid-20th century. Contrary to the infectious disease epidemiology which had prevailed at the beginning of the 20th century and which had focused on single agents causing individual diseases, the chronic disease epidemiology which emerged at the end of Word War II was a much more complex enterprise that investigated a multiplicity of risk factors for each disease. Involved in the development of chronic disease epidemi-ology were therefore fundamental discussions on the notion of (...)
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  14. M. R. (1940). The Philosophy of the Act by George Herbert Mead; Charles W. Morris. [REVIEW] Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 31:482-483.
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  15. James Swindal (2012). Action and Existence: A Case for Agent Causation. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Introduction : action, thought, pragmatism -- Neo-pragmatism and its critics -- Methodology : reconstructive dialectics -- A history of action theory -- Defining actions -- The explanation of action -- A material explication of agency -- Agency and existence.
     
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  16.  98
    Daniel Westberg (1994). Right Practical Reason: Aristotle, Action, and Prudence in Aquinas. Oxford University Press.
    This book is a study of the role of intellect in human action as described by Thomas Aquinas. One of its primary aims is to compare the interpretation of Aristotle by Aquinas with the lines of interpretation offered in contemporary Aristotelian scholarship. The book seeks to clarify the problems involved in the appropriation of Aristotle's theory by a Christian theologian, including such topics as the practical syllogism and the problems of akrasia. Westberg argues that Aquinas was much closer to Aristotle (...)
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  17.  14
    Harald Kleinschmidt (2005). Perception and Action in Medieval Europe. Boydell Press.
    Perception and action : the genesis of their separation as concepts -- The transformation of perception in the early eleventh century : dance historical records from the village of Kölbigk in East Saxony -- Impacts from the environment : the perception of odour, touch and taste -- Impacts on the environment : the rationality of action -- Aesthetics and ethics : their separation as concepts.
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  18. Gustavo Leyva (ed.) (2008). Filosofía de la Acción: Un Análisis Histórico-Sistemático de la Acción y la Racionalidad Práctica En Los Clásicos de la Filosofía. Universidad Autónoma Metropolitana.
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  19. Ralph McInerny (1992). Aquinas on Human Action: A Theory of Practice. Catholic University Press.
     
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  20.  5
    Fred Newman (1997). The End of Knowing: A New Developmental Way of Learning. Routledge.
    How do we reconstruct our world when modernist ideas have been refuted and many social problems appear unsolvable? Fred Newman and Lois Holzman offer the alternative of "performed activity"--a non-academic way forward to develop and add meaning to our lives. The authors believe that it is through participation in cultural, educational and psychological projects that one can achieve personal enrichment. These projects and ideas have been formulated from 25 years of practice in the authors' own "anti-institution," a development community free (...)
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  21. John Paul (1997). The Lublin Lectures. P. Lang.
     
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  22.  67
    Arthur C. Danto (1973). Analytical Philosophy of Action. Cambridge University Press.
    A study of the philosophical problems associated with the concept of action. Professor Danto is concerned to isolate logically the notion of a 'basic action' and to examine the way in which context and intention, for example, can convert physiological movements into significant actions. He finds many suggestive parallels between the concepts - the logical architecture - of action and cognition and in developing this theme he becomes involved in and proposes new approaches to various long-standing problems connected with causality, (...)
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  23.  14
    Robert M. Wallace (1996). Hegel's Social Philosophy: The Project of Reconciliation. Journal of the History of Philosophy 34 (3):468-469.
    468 JOURNAL OF THE HISTORY OF PHILOSOPHY 34:3 JULY 1996 right that this distinction need not be a problem for Kant's, or his own, account. Indeed, further discussion of this could be the basis for defending both empirical explanation and a more interpretive or phenomenological understanding of events. But Hudson does not provide this discussion, and without it the "thinkability" of the free agency description is weak. Hudson himself seems uncertain at times as to how much authority to grant (...)
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  24.  7
    Patrick Craig (2013). Absoluta Cogitatio. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):227-246.
    Alain Badiou’s relationship to the work of Baruch Spinoza is a complex one. Though Badiou admires Spinoza’s courageous pursuit of the more geometrico, he is ardently critical of Spinoza on a number of fundamental ontological issues. Because of this, Spinoza often has had to bear the brunt of Badiou’s theoretical attacks. But how successful is Badiou’s attack on Spinoza? In this paper, I aim to show that this attack fails by examining the critique of Spinoza that Badiou provides in his (...)
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  25.  7
    Smita Talang (2008). Materialism in Indian Philosophy. Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 2:185-189.
    Materialism is the oldest known philosophy. Philosophy was born as materialism and man had been essentially materialistic in character. In general, all our earliest experiences are of the material world. Philosophy means love for knowledge which is the unique characteristic of man. Man is never satisfied with mere food and shelter. Reason impels him towards a quest for knowledge. Philosophy is born at a man's attempt to have rational explanation of the universe around him and of himself as a part (...)
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  26.  9
    Hwa Yol Jung (2013). Wang Yangming and the Way of World Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):461-486.
    This essay attempts to contextualize the importance of Wang Yangming’s 王陽明 philosophy in terms of world philosophy in the manner of Goethe’s innovative plan for “world literature” (Weltliteratur). China has the long history of philosophizing rather than non-philosophy contrary to the glaring and inexcusable misunderstanding of Hegel the Eurocentric universalist or monist. In today’s globalizing world of multicultural pluralism, ethnocentric universalism has become outdated and outmoded. Transversality, which is at once intercultural, interspecific, interdisciplinary, and intersensorial, is a far more (...)
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  27.  10
    Natania Meeker (2006). Voluptuous Philosophy: Literary Materialism in the French Enlightenment. Fordham University Press.
    Eighteenth-century France witnessed the rise of matter itself—in forms ranging from atoms to anatomies—as a privileged object of study. Voluptuous Philosophy redefines what is at stake in the emergence of an enlightened secular materialism by showing how questions of figure—how should a body be represented? What should the effects of this representation be on readers?—are tellingly and consistently located at the very heart of 18th-century debates about the nature of material substance. French materialisms of the Enlightenment are crucially invested not (...)
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  28.  39
    Jacques Derrida (2003). The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    Derrida's first book-length work, The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy , was originally written as a dissertation for his diplôme d'etudes superieures in 1953 and 1954. Surveying Husserl's major works on phenomenology, Derrida reveals what he sees as an internal tension in Husserl's central notion of genesis, and gives us our first glimpse into the concerns and frustrations that would later lead Derrida to abandon phenomenology and develop his now famous method of deconstruction. For Derrida, the problem of genesis (...)
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  29.  6
    Oliver Feltham (2013). Anatomy of Failure: Philosophy and Political Action. Bloomsbury Academic.
    Thrasymachus versus Socrates on philosophy and political action -- 1647: the history of the leveller-agitators and the new model army -- Hobbes' and Locke's metaphysics: substances no longer act, institutions act -- Hobbes and Locke on religious conflict: when institutions act, subjects act -- Hobbes and Locke on politics: sovereign action and contractual action -- Unveiling the forgotten model: the leveller-agitators on joint action.
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  30.  47
    Marc De Kesel (2004). Act Without Denial: Slavoj Žižek on Totalitarianism, Revolution and Political Act. Studies in East European Thought 56 (4):299-334.
    iek's thinking departs from the Lacanian claim that we live in a symbolic order, not a real world, and that the Real is what we desire, but can never know or grasp. There is a fundamental virtuality of reality that points to the lie in every truth-claim, and there are two ways of dealing with this:repression and denial. An ideology, a system or a regime becomes totalitarian when it denies the virtual character of both its world and its subject (democracy (...)
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  31.  63
    Karl Schuhmann & Barry Smith (1990). Elements of Speech Act Theory in the Work of Thomas Reid. History of Philosophy Quarterly 7 (1):47 - 66.
    Historical research has recently made it clear that, prior to Austin and Searle, the phenomenologist Adolf Reinach (1884-1917) developed a full-fledged theory of speech acts under the heading of what he called "social acts". He we consider a second instance of a speech act theory avant la lettre, which is to be found in the common sense philosophy of Thomas Reid (1710-1796). Reid’s s work, in contrast to that of Reinach, lacks both a unified approach and the detailed analyses of (...)
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  32. David Miller (1999). The Usefulness of Natural Philosophy: The Royal Society and the Culture of Practical Utility in the Later Eighteenth Century. British Journal for the History of Science 32 (2):185-201.
    From its very beginning the Royal Society was regarded by many, if not most, of its founders as centrally concerned with practical improvement. How could it be otherwise? The study of nature was not only a pious act in and of itself – a reading of the book of nature – but it was also the way in which God's Providence would provide discoveries for the relief of man's estate. The early ideologues of the Society, such as Robert Boyle and (...)
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  33.  2
    W. G. Burgdeh (1929). Gentile's Philosophy of the Spirit. Philosophy 4 (13):3-.
    Gentile's philosophy merits the attention of every serious thinker, for it presents the doctrine that reality is spiritual in a more uncompromising form than is to be found elsewhere, and claims to solve on this principle all the great problems that have beset the history of metaphysic. His own name for it is Absolute or Actual Idealism . For Gentile, nothing is real but the Spirit, and by the Spirit he means the pure act of self-conscious thinking. “The subject (...)
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  34. W. G. De Burgh (1929). Gentile's Philosophy of the Spirit. Philosophy 4 (13):3-22.
    Gentile's philosophy merits the attention of every serious thinker, for it presents the doctrine that reality is spiritual in a more uncompromising form than is to be found elsewhere, and claims to solve on this principle all the great problems that have beset the history of metaphysic. His own name for it is Absolute or Actual Idealism . For Gentile, nothing is real but the Spirit, and by the Spirit he means the pure act of self-conscious thinking. “The subject (...)
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  35.  32
    Vincent W. J. Van Gerven Oei (2012). Cumposition: Theses on Philosophy's Etymology. Continent 2 (1).
    continent. 2.1 (2012): 44–55. Philosophers are sperm, poetry erupts sperm and dribbles, philosopher recodes term, to terminate, —A. Staley Groves 1 There is, in the relation of human languages to that of things, something that can be approximately described as “overnaming”—the deepest linguistic reason for all melancholy and (from the point of view of the thing) for all deliberate muteness. Overnaming as the linguistic being of melancholy points to another curious relation of language: the overprecision that obtains in the tragic (...)
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  36. Bernard E. Rollin (2006). The Regulation of Animal Research and the Emergence of Animal Ethics: A Conceptual History. [REVIEW] Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 27 (4):285-304.
    The history of the regulation of animal research is essentially the history of the emergence of meaningful social ethics for animals in society. Initially, animal ethics concerned itself solely with cruelty, but this was seen as inadequate to late 20th-century concerns about animal use. The new social ethic for animals was quite different, and its conceptual bases are explored in this paper. The Animal Welfare Act of 1966 represented a very minimal and in many ways incoherent attempt to (...)
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  37.  6
    Alex Callinicos (2004). Making History: Agency, Structure, and Change in Social Theory. Brill.
    Printbegrænsninger: Der kan printes 10 sider ad gangen og max. 40 sider pr. session.
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  38.  11
    Tyler Tritten (2013). A Will Free to Presence . . . Or Not. Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 18 (1):67-78.
    This article presents Schelling’s doctrine of creation, primarily as outlined in his lectures on mythology and revelation. Schelling there presents not a will to power, but a power to will or not to will—the decisiveness of freedom rather than blind willing. Accordingly, Schelling is able to surpass the tradition of the metaphysics of presence through freedom as an unprecognoscible act prior to potency/power. Schelling’s will is not natural but preternatural, capable of bringing forth something original, i.e., that which first becomes (...)
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  39.  28
    Catherine Osborne (2007). Dumb Beasts and Dead Philosophers: Humanity and the Humane in Ancient Philosophy and Literature. Oxford University Press.
    The book is about three things. First, how Ancient thinkers perceived humans as like or unlike other animals; second about the justification for taking a humane attitude towards natural things; and third about how moral claims count as true, and how they can be discovered or acquired. Was Aristotle was right to see continuity in the psychological functions of animal and human souls? The question cannot be settled without taking a moral stance. As we can either focus on continuity or (...)
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  40.  7
    Lotte Mulligan (1992). Robert Hooke's ‘Memoranda’: Memory and Natural History. Annals of Science 49 (1):47-61.
    The organ of the memory was of crucial importance for Robert Hooke in his aim to improve natural history and the study of nature in general. As a mechanist he was careful to avoid the confident analogizing of his contemporaries, and he described his model in hypothetical form. However, he saw it as amenable to improvement—just as mechanically as the senses were augmented by the use of instruments. The close connection he made between a better memory mechanism and the (...)
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  41.  9
    Tomiţă Ciulei (2008). Reflections on an Ignored Dimension of Pre-Socratic Philosophy. Cultura 5 (1):40-59.
    This paper bases on a (great!) wrongful act which was made to Greek philosophy, and especially to the pre-Socratic one: the unilateral abatement of thestudies to those of cosmological nature. The big mutation would take place in Socrates’ time, who by the anthropology of the discourse takes philosophy to a theory of knowledge, through a program which would be perfected by Plato and especially by Aristotle. This is a point of view co-substantial to history of philosophy, which some times (...)
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  42.  18
    Bregham Dalgliesh, Enlightenment Contra Humanism: Michel Foucault's Critical History of Thought.
    In this dissertation I claim that Michel Foucault is a pro-enlightenment philosopher. I argue that his critical history of thought cultivates a state of being autonomous in thought and action which is indicative of a kantian notion of maturity. In addition, I contend that, because he follows a nietzschean path to enlightenment, Foucault’s elaboration of freedom proceeds from his critique of who we are, which includes a rejection of humanism’s experiential limits. At the same time, and perhaps most importantly, (...)
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  43.  3
    John R. White (2005). Exemplary Persons and Ethics: The Significance of St. Francis for the Philosophy of Max Scheler. American Catholic Philosophical Quarterly 79 (1):57-90.
    For Max Scheler, St. Francis represented perhaps the highest ideal of the moral life, an ideal he felt compelled to articulate throughout his philosophical work. In this paper, I examine the significance of the person of St. Francis for Scheler’s philosophy. I begin by developing Scheler’s notion of “exemplary person,” the idea that persons act as influences on moral life and thought. I then hypothesize that St. Francis functioned as an exemplary person for Scheler. Finally, I attempt to justify that (...)
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  44.  9
    William Desmond (2005). Doing Justice and the Practice of Philosophy. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 79:41-59.
    There is a sense of doing justice prior to the juxtaposition of theory and practice, accounting for an ontological vulnerability prior to both social power andsocial vulnerability. Justice in the sense of “being true” involves fidelity to truth that we neither possess nor construct, preceding all efforts to enact justice. The charge to be just precedes any just act. There is a “patience of being,” or a receiving of being before acting, which we must then actively take up. All this (...)
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  45.  2
    W. G. de Burgh (1929). Gentile's Philosophy of the Spirit. Journal of Philosophical Studies 4 (13):3-22.
    Gentile's philosophy merits the attention of every serious thinker, for it presents the doctrine that reality is spiritual in a more uncompromising form than is to be found elsewhere, and claims to solve on this principle all the great problems that have beset the history of metaphysic. His own name for it is Absolute or Actual Idealism . For Gentile, nothing is real but the Spirit, and by the Spirit he means the pure act of self-conscious thinking. “The subject (...)
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  46.  6
    Andrew Chrucky, Comments on Chyzhevs'kyi's Historiography of Philosophy in Ukraine.
    Several months ago, after I volunteered to examine Dmytro Chyzhevs'kyi's works on the history of philosophy in Ukraine, I found myself with a dilemma. The first problem was that I did not possess a first-hand knowledge of Ukrainian literature to conceive independently a history of philosophy in Ukraine to act as a foil against Chyzhevs'kyi's views. The second problem was that my reading of Chyzhevs'kyi resulted in an unmanageable pile of criticism. The result is that what I have (...)
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  47. Marian Hobson (ed.) (2003). The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy. University of Chicago Press.
    Derrida's first book-length work, _The Problem of Genesis in Husserl's Philosophy_, was originally written as a dissertation for his _diplôme d'études supérieures_ in 1953 and 1954. Surveying Husserl's major works on phenomenology, Derrida reveals what he sees as an internal tension in Husserl's central notion of genesis, and gives us our first glimpse into the concerns and frustrations that would later lead Derrida to abandon phenomenology and develop his now famous method of deconstruction. For Derrida, the problem of genesis in (...)
     
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  48. Woo-Sung Huh (1988). A Critical Exposition of Nishida's Philosophy. Dissertation, University of Hawai'i
    Nishida in his writings pursued two main lines of thought, which are almost equally pervasive and persistent. These are the philosophy of self-consciousness, which is mainly religious and soteriological, and the philosophy of history-politics, which is fundamentally historical and political. Both philosophies are essentially ontologies, by virtue of the application of ontological operators. These operators function in almost every phase of Nishida's philosophy, with the notable exception of his discussion of the sciences, and in the main include activity, self-determination, (...)
     
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  49. John J. Stuhr (ed.) (1999). Pragmatism and Classical American Philosophy: Essential Readings and Interpretive Essays. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Classical American philosophy has both contemporary and historical significance. It provides direct, imaginative, and critical insights into our contemporary global society, its massive and pressing problems, and its possibilities for real improvement. Pragmatism and Classical American Philosophy, 2/e, provides the resources necessary to understand and act on these insights. Revised and greatly expanded in this second edition, it offers a comprehensive account of classical American philosophy and pragmatism, presenting the essential writings of all the major figures of the tradition: Charles (...)
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  50. Iakovos Vasiliou (ed.) (2016). Moral Motivation: A History. Oxford University Press Usa.
    Moral Motivation presents a history of the concept of moral motivation. The book consists of ten chapters by eminent scholars in the history of philosophy, covering Plato, Aristotle, later Peripatetic philosophy, medieval philosophy, Spinoza, Locke, Hume, Kant, Fichte and Hegel, and the consequentialist tradition. In addition, four interdisciplinary "Reflections" discuss how the topic of moral motivation arises in epic poetry, Cicero, early opera, and Theodore Dreiser. Most contemporary philosophical discussions of moral motivation focus on whether and how moral (...)
     
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