Search results for 'Action research' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Bodil Stilling Blichfeldt & Jesper Rank Andersen (2006). Creating a Wider Audience for Action Research: Learning From Case-Study Research. Journal of Research Practice 2 (1):Article D2.score: 246.0
    Drawing upon the literature on action research and case-study research, this paper discusses similarities and differences between these two forms of research practice. The paper also highlights some of the criticisms and challenges action researchers face. It suggests ways in which action researchers may enhance the discussability of action research by: (a) increasing the transparency of their research processes, (b) declaring the intellectual frameworks brought into action research projects, (c) (...)
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  2. Paul McIntosh (2010). Action Research and Reflective Practice: Creative and Visual Methods to Facilitate Reflection and Learning. Routledge.score: 240.0
    The tension in evidence-based practice and reflective practice -- The relationship between reflection and action research -- An overview of theories of consciousness and unconsciousness -- What do we mean by creativity? -- Using metaphor and symbolism as analysis -- Infinite possibilities of knowing and transformation -- Concluding thoughts; the linkages to action research and critical creativity.
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  3. Michael Owen (2006). Conflict and Convergence: The Ethics Review of Action Research. [REVIEW] Journal of Academic Ethics 4 (1-4):61-75.score: 240.0
    The article is based on the author’s experience as an administrator of three primarily social science institutional review boards (IRBs) to which researchers presented research protocols that purported to be minimal risk studies of teacher practice where the “teacher–researcher” was the “research subject.” Recently, educational, social, and behavioral science researchers encounter many problems with regard to their methodologies and the oversight mandate of the IRBs. There is a divergence between the IRB’s role and assumed bio-clinical predisposition and the (...)
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  4. Hans Chr Garmann Johnsen (2005). Action Research and Knowledge Co-Generation: A Not so Dangerous Liaison with Conventional Social Research. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):543-551.score: 240.0
    The article reflects on experience of action research in the context of regional development, where there has been pressure to produce practical results. The epistemological status of Action Research is explored, in contrast to conventional social science research. The article concludes that an ongoing relationship with conventional social research is necessary.
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  5. Eva Brandt (2004). Action Research in User-Centred Product Development. AI and Society 18 (2):113-133.score: 240.0
    Technological development and increased international competition have imposed a significant burden on the product development function of many companies. The growing complexity of products demands a larger product development team with people having various competencies. Simultaneously the importance of good quality, usability and customisation of products is growing, and many companies want to involve customers and users directly in the development work. Both the complexity and quality demand new ways of working that support collaboration between people with various competencies, interests (...)
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  6. Samuel Adjei-Nsiah, Cees Leeuwis, Ken E. Giller & Thom W. Kuyper (2008). Action Research on Alternative Land Tenure Arrangements in Wenchi, Ghana: Learning From Ambiguous Social Dynamics and Self-Organized Institutional Innovation. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 25 (3):389-403.score: 240.0
    This study reports on action research efforts that were aimed at developing institutional arrangements beneficial for soil fertility improvement. Three stages of action research are described and analyzed. We initially began by bringing stakeholders together in a platform to engage in a collaborative design of new arrangements. However, this effort was stymied mainly because conditions conducive for learning and negotiation were lacking. We then proceeded to support experimentation with alternative arrangements initiated by individual landowners and migrant (...)
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  7. Trond Haga (2005). Action Research and Innovation in Networks, Dilemmas and Challenges: Two Cases. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):362-383.score: 240.0
    Innovation plays a central role in economic development, at regional and national level. The paper takes a practical approach to innovation and the support of entrepreneurship, based on experience of facilitating two contrasting networks of enterprises. Action research is seen as having a central role, but with different approaches according to the innovation process concerned, and the part of the process.
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  8. Matthew R. Hunt, Patrick Gogognon & Valéry Ridde (2014). Ethical Considerations Related to Participation and Partnership: An Investigation of Stakeholders' Perceptions of an Action-Research Project on User Fee Removal for the Poorest in Burkina Faso. BMC Medical Ethics 15 (1):13.score: 240.0
    Healthcare user fees present an important barrier for accessing services for the poorest (indigents) in Burkina Faso and selective removal of fees has been incorporated in national healthcare planning. However, establishing fair, effective and sustainable mechanisms for the removal of user fees presents important challenges. A participatory action-research project was conducted in Ouargaye, Burkina Faso, to test mechanisms for identifying those who are indigents, and funding and implementing user fee removal. In this paper, we explore stakeholder perceptions of (...)
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  9. Dhawal Mehta, Jatin Pancholi & Paurav Shukla (2004). Action Research in Policy Making: A Case in the Dairy Industry in Gujarat, India. [REVIEW] AI and Society 18 (4):344-363.score: 240.0
    Action research has been extensively used world-wide for decision making related to policy due to its nature of involving the researcher and decision maker in the process. Following independence in India, one of the major revolutions was brought about in the dairy sector with regard to complete management systems. Most innovations and changes occurred in the line function while the staff function was more often neglected in the overall change. The authors undertook an action research study (...)
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  10. Mike Walsh, Gordon Grant & Zoë Coleman (2008). Action Research—a Necessary Complement to Traditional Health Science? Health Care Analysis 16 (2):127-144.score: 240.0
    There is continuing interest in action research in health care. This is despite action researchers facing major problems getting support for their projects from mainstream sources of R&D funds partly because its validity is disputed and partly because it is difficult to predict or evaluate and is therefore seen as risky. In contrast traditional health science dominates and relies on compliance with strictly defined scientific method and rules of accountability. Critics of scientific health care have highlighted many (...)
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  11. Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen & Francesco Garibaldo (2004). Action Research Through a European Perspective—Based on Scandinavian and Italian Traditions. AI and Society 18 (2):87-99.score: 240.0
    Historically, the Italian and Scandinavian institutionalisation of action research has developed along different tracks. The question is, if there are any promising prospects to combine different action research experiences and methodologies across European regions? Alternatively, should we conclude that action research is mainly a local activity firmly rooted in a special culture in the different European countries?
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  12. Jens Kristian Fosse (2005). The Potential of Dialogue in a Municipal Development Project: Action Research and Planning Practice. [REVIEW] AI and Society 19 (4):464-484.score: 210.0
    This article applies reflexive and dialogue oriented approaches to municipal planning. Experience from the dialogical development process in Vennesla is discussed, highlighting the potential of collaborative work in a development coalition. Dialogue and democracy in the coalition are discussed, emphasising the social construction of meaning and knowledge.
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  13. A. J. Hampshire (2000). What is Action Research and Can It Promote Change in Primary Care? Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 6 (4):337-343.score: 210.0
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  14. Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen (2004). Action Research?Scandinavian Experiences. AI and Society 18 (1):21-43.score: 192.0
    This article focus on paradigms, methods and ethics of action research in the Scandinavian countries. The specific features of the action research paradigm are identified. a historical overview follows of some main action research projects in Norway, Sweden and Denmark. The tendency towards upscale action research projects from organisational or small community projects to large-scale, regional based network approaches are also outlined and discussed. Finally, a synthesised approach of the classical, socio-technical (...) research approach and the large-scale network and holistic approaches is suggested as a promising approach for the future. (shrink)
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  15. Leslie Gelling & Carol Munn-Giddings (2011). Ethical Review of Action Research: The Challenges for Researchers and Research Ethics Committees. Research Ethics 7 (3):100-106.score: 186.0
    Action research has repeatedly demonstrated how it can facilitate problem solving and change in many settings through a process of collaboration which is driven by the community at the heart of the research. The ethical review of action research can be challenging for action researchers and research ethics committees. This paper explores how seven ethical principles can be used by action researchers and research ethics committees as the basis for ethical review. (...)
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  16. Kipp McMichael & Geoffrey Bingham (2001). Functional Separation of the Senses is a Requirement of Perception/Action Research. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (2):227-228.score: 180.0
    Stoffregen & Bardy's arguments against separation of the senses fail to consider the functional differences between the kinds of information potentially available in the structured energy arrays that correspond to the traditional senses. Since most perception/action research pursues a strategy of information perturbation presupposing differential contributions from the various ambient arrays, the global array hypothesis can only be extended and tested by analyses that consider the functional aspects along which the senses can, in fact, be separated.
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  17. Lorraine Foreman-peck & Jane Murray (2008). Action Research and Policy. Journal of Philosophy of Education 42 (s1):145-163.score: 180.0
    This article examines the relationship between action research and policy and the kind of confidence teachers, policy makers and other potential users may have in such research. Many published teacher action research accounts are criticised on the grounds that they do not fully meet the conventional standards for reporting social scientific research, and by implication are held to be less trustworthy. Action research is nevertheless often seen by some academics and policy makers (...)
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  18. Riane Eisler (1997). Action Research and Human Evolution: David Loye's Lifelong Exploration of Moral Sensitivity. World Futures 49 (1):89-101.score: 180.0
    (1997). Action research and human evolution: David Loye's lifelong exploration of moral sensitivity. World Futures: Vol. 49, The Dialatic of Evolution: Essays in Honor of David Loye, pp. 89-101.
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  19. Giulia Mancini & Francesca Sbordone (2004). The History of an Italian Action Research Experience. AI and Society 18 (2):175-207.score: 180.0
    The paper describes a highly specific Italian action research experience, connected with the trade unions, going through different phases from the 1970s to the present day. The journey is not only a journey through time but also through different approaches. It ranges from the initial experience focusing on health and safety problems at the workplace involving the workers as co-designers of new working environments to today’s search conference experience. For each phase there is a full description and comment (...)
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  20. Jody L. Stark (2014). The Potential of Deweyan-Inspired Action Research. Education and Culture 30 (2):87-101.score: 180.0
    This article examines the potential of Action Research informed by Dewey’s pragmatism as a research methodology in the social sciences. Not only a philosophical orientation, pragmatism is also a powerful mode of inquiry. When combined with the democratic research approach of Action Research, Deweyan pragmatism has great potential to shed light on educational and other social science questions, forward social change, and enact Dewey’s vision of radical social democracy. Although Dewey’s philosophy, one could argue, (...)
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  21. Action Research Christian (2003). Christian Action Research and Education (CARE): Declaration on Human Genetics and Other New Technologies in Medicine. Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 9 (1):6.score: 180.0
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  22. Anne Galletta & Vanessa Jones (2010). “Why Are You Doing This?” Questions on Purpose, Structure, and Outcomes in Participatory Action Research Engaging Youth and Teacher Candidates. Educational Studies 46 (3):337-357.score: 180.0
    Our article is based on a study of our integration of social foundations coursework with filmmaking and participatory action research, bringing teacher candidates and middle and high school students together. The project was carried out in partnership between an urban university and two nearby public schools within a Midwestern city known for high child poverty rates and weak academic outcomes. The project sought to stretch the imagination of teacher candidates in areas related to school reform and to provide (...)
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  23. Nazir Walji (2009). Leadership: An Action Research Approach. [REVIEW] AI and Society 23 (1):69-84.score: 180.0
    The role of leadership in the twenty-first century is challenging and varied, with changes often impacting across national borders. Leadership is a process, involving reciprocal influence. It has shortcomings and limitations, but in optimum conditions it can harmoniously harness and synthesize relevant knowledge, make sense of environmental features and changes, and co-generate new knowledge, usually in response to strategic demands and exigencies. Leadership responsibilities are all encompassing and require a holistic overview. Participatory action research is the chosen methodological (...)
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  24. Massimo Battaglia, Lara Bianchi, Marco Frey & Emilio Passetti (2015). Sustainability Reporting and Corporate Identity: Action Research Evidence in an Italian Retailing Cooperative. Business Ethics: A European Review 24 (1):52-72.score: 180.0
    Cooperatives are facing the challenge to be competitive in the market, without losing their traditional values of mutuality and democracy. To do that, they need to re-construct open and participative dialogue with their employees and members based on more democratic forms of communication and engagement. From this point of view, the measurement and communication of sustainability aspects may allow a dialogue to be mobilized with shareholders and stakeholders without losing the attention on competitive factors. Based on these premises, the article (...)
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  25. Dr Eugenie Georgaca (2000). Participation, Knowledge and Power in 'New' Forms of Action Research. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 2 (1):43-59.score: 180.0
    The paper uses the Offenders' Social Reintegration Project, run between 1988 and 1998 by the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, to discuss the characteristics of new forms of action research and to reflect on the main debates within action research literature. Firstly, new forms of action research dealing with community issues tend to take place within complex systems, aiming to bring potential partners together and to facilitate the development of networks of organisations. Networking presupposes (...)
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  26. Hana Konečná, Tonko Mardešić, Taťána Rumpíková & Tomáš Kučera (2012). Qualitative Research in Reproductive Medicine: From Description to Action. Human Affairs 22 (4):462-474.score: 180.0
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  27. F. Garibaldo & E. Rebecchi (2004). Some Reflections on the Epistemological Fundaments of an Italian Action-Research Experience. AI and Society 18 (1):44-67.score: 174.0
    In this paper the authors, starting from the experience described and commented on in earlier work by Mancini and Sbordone, deal with the three main epistemological problems that the research group they participated in had to face:The conflicting and ambiguous relationship between psychoanalysis and social researchThe classical epistemological problem of the relationship between the subject and object of research within the perspective of action researchThe problem arising from their experience, i.e., the risk of manipulation, and the way (...)
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  28. Kevin Connolly, Dylan Bianchi, Craig French, Lana Kuhle & Andy MacGregor, Perceptual Learning and Action (Network for Sensory Research/University of York Perceptual Learning Workshop, Question Five).score: 156.0
    This is an excerpt of a report that highlights and explores five questions that arose from the Network for Sensory Research workshop on perceptual learning and perceptual recognition at the University of York in March, 2012. This portion of the report explores the question: How is perceptual learning coordinated with action?
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  29. Lieve Goorden, Michiel Van Oudheusden, Johan Evers & Marian Deblonde (2008). Lose One Another ... And Find One Another in Nanospace. 'Nanotechnologies for Tomorrow's Society: A Case for Reflective Action Research in Flanders (Nanosoc)'. [REVIEW] NanoEthics 2 (3):213-230.score: 156.0
    The main objective of the Flemish research project ‘Nanotechnologies for tomorrow’s society’ (NanoSoc) is to develop and try out an interactive process as a suitable methodology for rendering nanoresearchers aware of underlying assumptions that guide nanotech research and integrating social considerations into the research choices they face. In particular, the NanoSoc process should sustain scientists’ capacities to address growing uncertainties on the strategic, scientific and public acceptance level. The article elaborates on these uncertainties and involved dilemmas scientists (...)
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  30. Nicolas Faysse, Mostafa Errahj, Catherine Dumora, Hassan Kemmoun & Marcel Kuper (2012). Linking Research and Public Engagement: Weaving an Alternative Narrative of Moroccan Family Farmers' Collective Action. [REVIEW] Agriculture and Human Values 29 (3):413-426.score: 156.0
    Rural development policies are often inspired by narratives that are difficult to challenge because they are based on an apparently obvious and coherent reading of reality. Research may confront such narratives and trigger debates outside the academic community, but this can have a feedback effect and lead to a simplistic or biased posture in research. This article analyzes a research-based initiative that questioned a commonly held narrative in large-scale irrigation schemes in Morocco concerning the structural weaknesses of (...)
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  31. Leonard Krimerman (2001). Participatory Action Research: Should Social Inquiry Be Conducted Democratically? Philosophy of the Social Sciences 31 (1):60-82.score: 156.0
    of democratizing social inquiry by actively engaging the subject in the design and conduct of research. Drawing on four examples of PAR-based social science and a democratic reconstruction of "epistemic privilege," this article argues that philosophers need to take seriously PAR's notion that democratic norms should guide social inquiry. But it does not advocate replacing mainstream or expert-directed social science by PAR. Instead, it maintains that it is both possible and sensible for PAR practitioners to collaborate with conventional (...). Indeed, certain forms of nonparticipatory social science seem indispensable for any extensive application of the PAR framework. The article concludes by drawing out its (controversial) implications for two central issues in the philosophy of social science: first, that the methods of social inquiry are distinct from those in the natural sciences and, second, that there is a sense in which social research can and should be "value neutral.". (shrink)
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  32. Courtney Kosky (2008). An Action Research Exploration Integrating Student Choice and Arts Activities in a Sixth. Journal of Social Studies Research 32:1.score: 156.0
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  33. Mary Hartog (2002). Becoming a Reflective Practitioner: A Continuing Professional Development Strategy Through Humanistic Action Research. Business Ethics 11 (3):233–243.score: 150.0
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  34. Wilfred Carr (2006). Philosophy, Methodology and Action Research. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (4):421–435.score: 150.0
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  35. Fred H. Blum (1955). Action Research--A Scientific Approach? Philosophy of Science 22 (1):1-7.score: 150.0
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  36. Günther Knoblich, Stephen Andrew Butterfill & Natalie Sebanz, Psychological Research on Joint Action : Theory and Data.score: 150.0
    When two or more people coordinate their actions in space and time to produce a joint outcome, they perform a joint action. The perceptual, cognitive, and motor processes that enable individuals to coordinate their actions with others have been receiving increasing attention during the last decade, complementing earlier work on shared intentionality and discourse. This chapter reviews current theoretical concepts and empirical findings in order to provide a structured overview of the state of the art in joint action (...)
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  37. Olav Eikeland (2008). The Ways of Aristotle: Aristotelian Phrónêsis, Aristotelian Philosophy of Dialogue, and Action Research. Peter Lang.score: 150.0
    This book is a meticulous study of Aristotle's phronesis and its applications to the fields of personal development or character formation and of ethical ...
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  38. David Coghlan (2013). Action Research as a Scholarship of Praxis. The Lonergan Review 4 (1):181-194.score: 150.0
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  39. John Elliott (1987). Educational Theory, Practical Philosophy and Action Research. British Journal of Educational Studies 35 (2):149 - 169.score: 150.0
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  40. Mike McNamee (2001). The Guilt of Whistling-Blowing: Conflicts in Action Research and Educational Ethnography. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (3):423–441.score: 150.0
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  41. Les Tickle (2001). Opening Windows, Closing Doors: Ethical Dilemmas in Educational Action Research. Journal of Philosophy of Education 35 (3):345–359.score: 150.0
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  42. U. Gerhardt, R. Breitschwerdt & O. Thomas (forthcoming). Relapse Prevention in Drug Addiction: Addressing a Messy Problem by IS Action Research. AI and Society.score: 150.0
  43. Marianna Papastephanou (2006). Philosophical Research and Educational Action Research. Journal of Philosophy of Education 40 (2):187–203.score: 150.0
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  44. Elisabeth Bergdahl, Eva Benzein, Britt-Marie Ternestedt & Birgitta Andershed (2011). Development of Nurses' Abilities to Reflect on How to Create Good Caring Relationships with Patients in Palliative Care: An Action Research Approach. Nursing Inquiry 18 (2):111-122.score: 150.0
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  45. Andrew Robinson (1995). Transformative ?Cultural Shifts' in Nursing: Participatory Action Research and the ?Project of Possibility? Nursing Inquiry 2 (2):65-74.score: 150.0
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  46. Frank Cornelissen & Ellen van den Berg (forthcoming). Characteristics of the Research Supervision of Postgraduate Teachers' Action Research. Educational Studies:1-16.score: 150.0
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  47. Richard Ennals (2009). Jean McNiff and Jack Whitehead: Doing and Writing Action Research. [REVIEW] AI and Society 24 (4):415-416.score: 150.0
  48. Francesco Garibaldo & Lauge Baungaard Rasmussen (2004). Action Research?A European Dimension. AI and Society 18 (1):1-6.score: 150.0
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  49. Eugenie Georgaca (2000). Participation, Knowledge and Power in 'New'Forms of Action Research. Outlines. Critical Practice Studies 2 (1):43-59.score: 150.0
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  50. Hans Chr Garmann Johnsen, James Karlsen, Roger Normann & Jens Kristian Fosse (2009). The Contradictory Nature of Knowledge: A Challenge for Understanding Innovation in a Local Context and Workplace Development and for Doing Action Research. [REVIEW] AI and Society 23 (1):85-98.score: 150.0
    The argument in this article is that knowledge is an important phenomenon to understand in order to discuss development and innovation in modern workplaces. Predominant theories on knowledge in organisation and innovation literature, we argue, are based on a dualist concept of knowledge. The arguments found in these theories argue for one type of knowledge in contrast to another. The most prevailing dualism is that between local and universal knowledge. We believe that arguing along this line does not bring us (...)
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