Search results for 'Active Vision' (try it on Scholar)

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  1. Gerald Vision (1997). Problems of Vision: Rethinking the Causal Theory of Perception. New York: Oxford University Press.score: 210.0
    In this book Gerald Vision argues for a new causal theory, one that engages provocatively with direct realism and makes no use of a now discredited subjectivism.
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  2. Wayne Wright (2006). Visual Stuff and Active Vision. Philosophical Psychology 19 (2):129-149.score: 126.0
    This paper examines the status of unattended visual stimuli in the light of recent work on the role of attention in visual perception. Although the question of whether attention is required for visual experience seems very interesting, this paper argues that there currently is no good reason to take a stand on the issue. Moreover, it is argued that much of the allure of that question stems from a continued attachment to the defective ‘inner picture view’ of experience and a (...)
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  3. Gerald Vision (1998). Blindsight and Philosophy. Philosophical Psychology 11 (2):137-59.score: 120.0
    The evidence of blindsight is occasionally used to argue that we can see things, and thus have perceptual belief, without the distinctive visual awareness accompanying normal sight; thereby displacing phenomenality as a component of the concept of vision. I maintain that arguments to this end typically rely on misconceptions about blindsight and almost always ignore associated visual (or visuomotor) pathologies relevant to the lessons of such cases. More specifically, I conclude, first, that the phenomena very likely do not result (...)
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  4. John Stewart & Olivier Gapenne (2004). Reciprocal Modelling of Active Perception of 2-D Forms in a Simple Tactile-Vision Substitution System. Minds and Machines 14 (3):309-330.score: 90.0
    The strategies of action employed by a human subject in order to perceive simple 2-D forms on the basis of tactile sensory feedback have been modelled by an explicit computer algorithm. The modelling process has been constrained and informed by the capacity of human subjects both to consciously describe their own strategies, and to apply explicit strategies; thus, the strategies effectively employed by the human subject have been influenced by the modelling process itself. On this basis, good qualitative and semi-quantitative (...)
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  5. Manish Singh & Donald D. Hoffman (1998). Active Vision and the Basketball Problem. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):772-773.score: 90.0
    It is fruitful to think of the representational and the organism-centered approaches as complementary levels of analysis, rather than mutually exclusive alternatives. Claims to the contrary by proponents of the organism-centered approach face what we call the “basketball problem.”.
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  6. Robert H. Wurtz, Kerry McAlonan, James Cavanaugh & Rebecca A. Berman (2011). Thalamic Pathways for Active Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):177-184.score: 90.0
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  7. J. McCrone (2004). John N. Findlay & Iain D. Gilchrist, Active Vision. In Anthony I. Jack (ed.), Journal of Consciousness Studies. Thorverton Uk: Imprint Academic. 11--5.score: 90.0
     
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  8. Rebecca A. Berman Robert H. Wurtz, Kerry McAlonan, James Cavanaugh (2011). Thalamic Pathways for Active Vision. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 15 (4):177.score: 90.0
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  9. Nigel J. T. Thomas (2014). The Multidimensional Spectrum of Imagination: Images, Dreams, Hallucinations, and Active, Imaginative Perception. Humanities 3 (2):132-184.score: 84.0
    A theory of the structure and cognitive function of the human imagination that attempts to do justice to traditional intuitions about its psychological centrality is developed, largely through a detailed critique of the theory propounded by Colin McGinn. Like McGinn, I eschew the highly deflationary views of imagination, common amongst analytical philosophers, that treat it either as a conceptually incoherent notion, or as psychologically trivial. However, McGinn fails to develop his alternative account satisfactorily because (following Reid, Wittgenstein and Sartre) he (...)
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  10. G. Singer & R. H. Day (1966). Spatial Adaptation and Aftereffect with Optically Transformed Vision: Effects of Active and Passive Responding and the Relationship Between Test and Exposure Responses. Journal of Experimental Psychology 71 (5):725.score: 84.0
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  11. Robert Briscoe (2008). Vision, Action, and Make‐Perceive. Mind and Language 23 (4):457-497.score: 78.0
    In this paper, I critically assess the enactive account of visual perception recently defended by Alva Noë (2004). I argue inter alia that the enactive account falsely identifies an object’s apparent shape with its 2D perspectival shape; that it mistakenly assimilates visual shape perception and volumetric object recognition; and that it seriously misrepresents the constitutive role of bodily action in visual awareness. I argue further that noticing an object’s perspectival shape involves a hybrid experience combining both perceptual and imaginative elements (...)
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  12. Mirko Farina (forthcoming). On the Active Boundaries of Vision. Biology and Philosophy.score: 72.0
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  13. Mirko Farina (2013). Jan Lauwereyns: Brain and the Gaze: On the Active Boundaries of Vision. [REVIEW] Biology and Philosophy 28 (6):1029-1038.score: 72.0
  14. Donald Quinlan (1970). Effects of Sight of the Body and Active Locomotion in Perceptual Adaptation. Journal of Experimental Psychology 86 (1):91.score: 66.0
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  15. Robert Briscoe (2009). Egocentric Spatial Representation in Action and Perception. Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 79 (2):423 - 460.score: 60.0
    Neuropsychological findings used to motivate the "two visual systems" hypothesis have been taken to endanger a pair of widely accepted claims about spatial representation in conscious visual experience. The first is the claim that visual experience represents 3-D space around the perceiver using an egocentric frame of reference. The second is the claim that there is a constitutive link between the spatial contents of visual experience and the perceiver's bodily actions. In this paper, I review and assess three main sources (...)
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  16. Laura Yenisa Cabrera Trujillo (forthcoming). Visioneering and the Role of Active Engagement and Assessment. Nanoethics:1-6.score: 60.0
    According to some technology enthusiasts our technological developments appear to be accelerating at an exponential rate. A common vision of such enthusiasts is that the accelerating pace of science and technology development will enable us to transform the world in more profound and significant ways than at any other time in our history. More importantly, some of these technology enthusiasts have gone beyond having technological-driven visions about the future to be actively engaged in a diverse set of activities aimed (...)
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  17. Jaro Kotalik, Cathy Covino, Nadine Doucette, Steve Henderson, Michelle Langlois, Karen McDaid & Louisa M. Pedri (2014). Framework for Ethical Decision-Making Based on Mission, Vision and Values of the Institution. HEC Forum 26 (2):125-133.score: 54.0
    The authors led the development of a framework for ethical decision-making for an Academic Health Sciences Centre. They understood the existing mission, vision, and values statement (MVVs) of the centre as a foundational assertion that embodies an ethical commitment of the institution. Reflecting the Patient and Family Centred Model of Care the institution is living, the MVVs is a suitable base on which to construct an ethics framework. The resultant framework consists of a set of questions for each of (...)
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  18. Daniel Holender (1986). Semantic Activation Without Conscious Identification in Dichotic Listening, Parafoveal Vision, and Visual Masking: A Survey and Appraisal. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (1):1-23.score: 48.0
    When the stored representation of the meaning of a stimulus is accessed through the processing of a sensory input it is maintained in an activated state for a certain amount of time that allows for further processing. This semantic activation is generally accompanied by conscious identification, which can be demonstrated by the ability of a person to perform discriminations on the basis of the meaning of the stimulus. The idea that a sensory input can give rise to semantic activation without (...)
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  19. Naomi M. Eilan (2006). On the Role of Perceptual Consciousness in Explaining the Goals and Mechanisms of Vision: A Convergence on Attention? Aristotelian Society Supplementary Volume 80 (1):67-88.score: 42.0
    The strong sensorimotor account of perception gives self-induced movements two constitutive roles in explaining visual consciousness. The first says that self-induced movements are vehicles of visual awareness, and for this reason consciousness ‘does not happen in the brain only’. The second says that the phenomenal nature of visual experiences is consists in the action-directing content of vision. In response I suggest, first, that the sense in which visual awareness is active should be explained by appeal to the role (...)
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  20. George Terzis (2001). How Crosstalk Creates Vision-Related Eureka Moments. Philosophical Psychology 14 (4):393 – 421.score: 42.0
    The discussion begins with a familiar and defensible characterization of the eureka moment, according to which it is the unexpected product of separate and often seemingly incompatible perspectives. The principal aim of the discussion is to explain how, so characterized, vision-related eureka moments can occur. To fulfill this aim, the discussion employs a notion of crosstalk, in which cognitive interference slightly increases as a result of the creative thinker's considerable, albeit only partly successful, pre-eureka cognitive effort. Such crosstalk, it (...)
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  21. Michael Land & Benjamin Tatler (2009). Looking and Acting: Vision and Eye Movements in Natural Behaviour. OUP Oxford.score: 42.0
    The cooperative action of different regions of our brains gives us an amazing capacity to perform activities as diverse as playing the piano and hitting a tennis ball. Somehow, without conscious effort, our eyes find the information we need to operate successfully in the world around us. The development of head-mounted eye trackers over recent years has made it possible to record where we look during different active tasks, and so work out what information our eyes supply to the (...)
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  22. V. C. Geeraets (forthcoming). Fictions of Restorative Justice, Vincent Geeraets. Criminal Law and Philosophy:1-17.score: 36.0
    In this paper, I argue that scholars such as John Braithwaite and Lode Walgrave rely on fictions when presenting their utopian vision of restorative justice. Three claims in particular are shown to be fictitious. Proponents of restorative justice maintain, first, that the offender and the victim voluntarily attend the restorative conference. Second, that the restorative conference enables the offender and the victim to take on active responsibility. Third, that the reparatory tasks on which the parties agree should not (...)
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  23. Catherine Summerhayes (2011). Embodied Space in Google Earth: Crisis in Darfur. Mediatropes 3 (1):113-134.score: 36.0
    “The ‘eyes’ made available in modern technological sciences shatter any idea of passive vision; these prosthetic devices show us that all eyes, including our own organic ones, are active perceptual systems…” (Donna Haraway, 1991). A tool of military surveillance to “love at a distance”? (Caroline Bassett, 2006). Google Earth, a culmination of remote sensing satellite technologies, mega database and 3D animations, is open to both kinds of critique. This paper focuses on the latter, on how the human faculty (...)
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  24. Niklas Gudowsky, Walter Peissl, Mahshid Sotoudeh & Ulrike Bechtold (2012). Forward-Looking Activities: Incorporating Citizens' Visions. Poiesis and Praxis 9 (1-2):101-123.score: 32.0
    Looking back on the many prophets who tried to predict the future as if it were predetermined, at first sight any forward-looking activity is reminiscent of making predictions with a crystal ball. In contrast to fortune tellers, today’s exercises do not predict, but try to show different paths that an open future could take. A key motivation to undertake forward-looking activities is broadening the information basis for decision-makers to help them actively shape the future in a desired way. Experts, laypeople, (...)
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  25. David Kirsh (2004). Metacognition, Distributed Cognition and Visual Design. Cognition, Education and Communication Technology:147--180.score: 30.0
    Metacognition is associated with planning, monitoring, evaluating and repairing performance Designers of elearning systems can improve the quality of their environments by explicitly structuring the visual and interactive display of learning contexts to facilitate metacognition. Typically page layout, navigational appearance, visual and interactivity design are not viewed as major factors in metacognition. This is because metacognition tends to be interpreted as a process in the head, rather than an interactive one. It is argued here, that cognition and metacognition are part (...)
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  26. Alva Noë (2001). Experience and the Active Mind. Synthese 61 (1):41-60.score: 30.0
    This paper investigates a new species of skeptical reasoning about visual experience that takes its start from developments in perceptual science (especially recent work on change blindness and inattentional blindness). According to this skepticism, the impression of visual awareness of the environment in full detail and high resolution is illusory. I argue that the new skepticism depends on misguided assumptions about the character of perceptual experience, about whether perceptual experiences are 'internal' states, and about how best to understand the relationship (...)
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  27. David Kirsh (2005). Metacognition, Distributed Cognition and Visual Design. In Peter Gardenfors, Petter Johansson & N. J. Mahwah (eds.), Cognition, education, and communication technology. Erlbaum Associates. 147--180.score: 30.0
    Metacognition is associated with planning, monitoring, evaluating and repairing performance Designers of elearning systems can improve the quality of their environments by explicitly structuring the visual and interactive display of learning contexts to facilitate metacognition. Typically page layout, navigational appearance, visual and interactivity design are not viewed as major factors in metacognition. This is because metacognition tends to be interpreted as a process in the head, rather than an interactive one. It is argued here, that cognition and metacognition are part (...)
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  28. Melvyn A. Goodale & A. David Milner (2004/2005). Sight Unseen: An Exploration of Conscious and Unconscious Vision. Oxford University Press.score: 30.0
    Vision, more than any other sense, dominates our mental life. Our visual experience is just so rich, so detailed, that we can hardly distinguish that experience from the world itself. Even when we just think about the world and don't look at it directly, we can't help but 'imagine' what it looks like. We think of 'seeing' as being a conscious activity--we direct our eyes, we choose what we look at, we register what we are seeing. The series of (...)
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  29. Dr Derek Gatherer (1998). Meme Pools, World 3 and Averroes' Vision of Immortality. Gatherer, Dr Derek (1998) Meme Pools, World 3 and Averroes’ Vision of Immortality. [Journal (Paginated)] 33 (2):203-219.score: 30.0
    Dawkins’ concept of the meme pool, essentially equivalent to Popper’s World 3, is considered as an expression in modern terms for what Averroes knew as the ‘active intellect’, an immortal entity feeding into, or even creating, the ‘passive intellect’ of consciousness. A means is thus provided for reconciling a materialist Darwinian view of the universe with a conception of non-personal immortality. The meme pool/active intellect correspondence provides a strong basis for regarding science as a communal enterprise producing enrichment (...)
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  30. Anna Caterina Dalmasso (2010). Il Rilievo Della Visione Movimento, Profondità, Cinema Ne Le Monde Sensible et Le Monde De L'Expression (Italian). Chiasmi International 12:83-110.score: 30.0
    Le relief de la vision. Mouvement, profondeur et cinéma dansLe monde sensible et le monde de l’expressionEst-il possible d’établir une connexion entre Le monde sensible et le monde de l’expression et la pensée du dernier Merleau-Ponty? De quelle manière une formulation germinale de la réflexion ontologique serait-elle présente dans le cours de 1953? Et quels sont les éléments de contact et de convergence qui permettent de retracer un tel lien?J’ai l’intention de proposer cette hypothèse à partir d’une considération du (...)
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  31. John M. Findlay & Robin Walker (1999). A Model of Saccade Generation Based on Parallel Processing and Competitive Inhibition. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 22 (4):661-674.score: 30.0
    During active vision, the eyes continually scan the visual environment using saccadic scanning movements. This target article presents an information processing model for the control of these movements, with some close parallels to established physiological processes in the oculomotor system. Two separate pathways are concerned with the spatial and the temporal programming of the movement. In the temporal pathway there is spatially distributed coding and the saccade target is selected from a Both pathways descend through a hierarchy of (...)
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  32. Frank H. Durgin (1998). Quasi-Modal Encounters of the Third Kind: The Filling-in of Visual Detail. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (6):756-757.score: 30.0
    Although Pessoa et al. imply that many aspects of the filling-in debate may be displaced by a regard for active vision, they remain loyal to naive neural reductionist explanations of certain pieces of psychophysical evidence. Alternative interpretations are provided for two specific examples and a new category of filling-in (of visual detail) is proposed.
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  33. Timothée Masquelier, Larissa Albantakis & Gustavo Deco (2011). The Timing of Vision – How Neural Processing Links to Different Temporal Dynamics. Frontiers in Psychology 2.score: 30.0
    We review here our recent attempts to model the neural correlates of visual perception with biologically-inspired networks of spiking neurons, emphasizing the dynamical aspects. Experimental evidence suggests distinct processing modes depending on the type of task the visual system is engaged in. A first mode deals with rapidly extracting the glimpse of a visual scene in the first 100ms after its presentation. The promptness of this process points to mainly feedforward processing, which may be shaped by Spike Timing-Dependent Plasticity. Our (...)
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  34. Nivedita Gangopadhyay & Julian Kiverstein (2009). Enactivism and the Unity of Perception and Action. Topoi 28 (1):63-73.score: 24.0
    This paper contrasts two enactive theories of visual experience: the sensorimotor theory (O’Regan and Noë, Behav Brain Sci 24(5):939–1031, 2001; Noë and O’Regan, Vision and mind, 2002; Noë, Action in perception, 2004) and Susan Hurley’s (Consciousness in action, 1998, Synthese 129:3–40, 2001) theory of active perception. We criticise the sensorimotor theory for its commitment to a distinction between mere sensorimotor behaviour and cognition. This is a distinction that is firmly rejected by Hurley. Hurley argues that personal level cognitive (...)
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  35. Harry G. Frankfurt (2006). Taking Ourselves Seriously & Getting It Right. Stanford University Press.score: 24.0
    Harry G. Frankfurt begins his inquiry by asking, “What is it about human beings that makes it possible for us to take ourselves seriously?” Based on The Tanner Lectures in Moral Philosophy, Taking Ourselves Seriously and Getting It Right delves into this provocative and original question. The author maintains that taking ourselves seriously presupposes an inward-directed, reflexive oversight that enables us to focus our attention directly upon ourselves, and “[it] means that we are not prepared to accept ourselves just as (...)
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  36. Dan Ryder (2009). Problems of Representation I: Nature and Role. In John Symons Paco Calvo (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Psychology. Routledge. 233.score: 24.0
    Introduction There are some exceptions, which we shall see below, but virtually all theories in psychology and cognitive science make use of the notion of representation. Arguably, folk psychology also traffics in representations, or is at least strongly suggestive of their existence. There are many different types of things discussed in the psychological and philosophical literature that are candidates for representation-hood. First, there are the propositional attitudes – beliefs, judgments, desires, hopes etc. (see Chapters 9 and 17 of this volume). (...)
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  37. David A. Leopold & Nikos K. Logothetis (1999). Multistable Phenomena: Changing Views in Perception. Trends in Cognitive Sciences 3 (7):254-264.score: 24.0
    Traditional explanations of multistable visual phenomena (e.g. ambiguous figures, perceptual rivalry) suggest that the basis for spontaneous reversals in perception lies in antagonistic connectivity within the visual system. In this review, we suggest an alternative, albeit speculative, explanation for visual multistability – that spontaneous alternations reflect responses to active, programmed events initiated by brain areas that integrate sensory and non-sensory information to coordinate a diversity of behaviors. Much evidence suggests that perceptual reversals are themselves more closely related to the (...)
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  38. Eugene Garver (2006). Confronting Aristotle's Ethics: Ancient and Modern Morality. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    What is the good life? Posing this question today would likely elicit very different answers. Some might say that the good life means doing good—improving one’s community and the lives of others. Others might respond that it means doing well—cultivating one’s own abilities in a meaningful way. But for Aristotle these two distinct ideas—doing good and doing well—were one and the same and could be realized in a single life. In Confronting Aristotle’s Ethics, Eugene Garver examines how we can draw (...)
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  39. David Knight (2000). Higher Pantheism. Zygon 35 (3):603-612.score: 24.0
    Romantic sensibility and political necessity led Humphry Davy, Britain's most prominent scientist in the first quarter of the nineteenth century, to pantheism: nature worship, involving for him a fervent belief in the immortality of the soul. Rapt with a vision of sublimity, from mountain tops or balloons, men of science in succeeding generations also found in pantheism a reason for their vocation and a way of making sense of their world. It should be seen as an alternative both to (...)
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  40. Nicole Pepperell (2009). Handling Value: Notes on Derrida's Inheritance of Marx. Derrida Today 2 (2):222-233.score: 24.0
    Derrida's Specters of Marx asks whether and how we could inherit Marx today: whether we might find, in a certain spirit of Marx, the critical resources to challenge resurgent liberal ideals, without this challenge assuming a dogmatic or totalitarian form. Derrida's own response to this question involves a curious move: a material transformation of Marx's text, in which Derrida first foreshadows, and then carries out, the excision of a single sentence from the pivotal passage in which Marx christens the commodity (...)
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  41. Michael Davis (2011). The Soul of the Greeks: An Inquiry. University of Chicago Press.score: 24.0
    The soul of Achilles -- Aristotle -- The doubleness of soul -- Out of itself for the sake of itself -- Nutritive soul -- Sensing soul: vision -- Thinking soul. Sensation and imagination ; Passive and active mind ; Imagination and thought -- The soul as self and self-aware -- "The father of the Logos" -- "For the friend is another self" -- Herodotus: the rest and motion of soul -- Rest in motion: Herodotus's Egypt -- Motion at (...)
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  42. Federica Riviello (2012). I lectores medioevali tra il libro e il testo. Doctor Virtualis 11 (11).score: 24.0
    L’intento del lavoro è di problematizzare alcuni aspetti, generalmente ritenuti emblematici, della relazione tra i litterati medievali e il libro – nelle sue declinazioni di Testo sacro, Libro della natura e auctoritates . L’impiego, come strumenti di lavoro, di concetti di recente elaborazione e di osservazioni di pensatori contemporanei sull’argomento, non è finalizzato ad attualizzare tale relazione, quanto piuttosto ad ampliare i punti di vista su di essa e a metterne alla prova la capacità di offrire originali spunti di riflessione. (...)
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  43. Andy Clark (2006). Sensorimotor Skills and Perception: Cognitive Complexity and the Sensorimotor Frontier. Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 80 (80):43-65.score: 24.0
    [Andy Clark] What is the relation between perceptual experience and the suite of sensorimotor skills that enable us to act in the very world we perceive? The relation, according to 'sensorimotor models' (O'Regan and Noë 2001, Noë 2004) is tight indeed. Perceptual experience, on these accounts, is enacted via skilled sensorimotor activity, and gains its content and character courtesy of our knowledge of the relations between (typically) movement and sensory stimulation. I shall argue that this formulation is too extreme, and (...)
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  44. David A. Leopold, Melanie Wilke, Alexander Maier & Nikos K. Logothetis (2002). Stable Perception of Visually Ambiguous Patterns. Nature Neuroscience 5 (6):605-609.score: 24.0
    Correspondence should be addressed to David A. Leopold david.leopold@tuebingen.mpg.deDuring the viewing of certain patterns, widely known as ambiguous or puzzle figures, perception lapses into a sequence of spontaneous alternations, switching every few seconds between two or more visual interpretations of the stimulus. Although their nature and origin remain topics of debate, these stochastic switches are generally thought to be the automatic and inevitable consequence of viewing a pattern without a unique solution. We report here that in humans such perceptual alternations (...)
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  45. Robert Van Gulick (2001). Still Room for Representations. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):1007-1008.score: 24.0
    One can support O'Regan & Noë's (O&N's) commitment to the active nature of vision and the importance of sensorimotor contingencies without joining them in rejecting any significant role for neurally realized visual representations in the process.
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  46. Zenon W. Pylyshyn (2001). Seeing, Acting, and Knowing. Behavioral and Brain Sciences 24 (5):999-999.score: 24.0
    The target article proposes that visual experience arises when sensorimotor contingencies are exploited in perception. This novel analysis of visual experience fares no better than the other proposals that the article rightly dismisses, and for the same reasons. Extracting invariants may be needed for recognition, but it is neither necessary nor sufficient for having a visual experience. While the idea that vision involves the active extraction of sensorimotor invariants has merit, it does not replace the need for perceptual (...)
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  47. David Robjant (2013). Symposium on Iris Murdoch. How Miserable We Are, How Wicked; Into the ‘Void’ with Murdoch, Mulhall, and Antonaccio. Heythrop Journal 54 (6):999-1006.score: 24.0
    Murdoch brings together the darkness of misery and the darkness of wickedness under the observation that ‘goodness is not acontinuously active organic part of our purposes and wishes’. This looks like an empirically minded correction of Socrates. But besides correcting Socrates, is Murdoch also offering, as Stephen Mulhall suggests, ‘a fundamental counter-example’ to her own ‘moral vision’? This depends on what one takes Murdoch’s moral vision to be. I trace Mulhall's mistake to Maria Antonaccio's misidentification of the (...)
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  48. Gideon Baker (2001). Civil Society Theory and Republican Democracy. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 4 (2):59-84.score: 24.0
    Calls to ?build civil society?, ?create active citizenship?, ?empower communities?, or ?widen political participation? are growing by the day. They are heard in academia, the private sector, among NGOs and increasingly in government. In short, the rhetoric of self?government, that ideal dear to republicans, is back on the political agenda. This time, however, it is increasingly tied to the category of civil society. Yet can the programme of ?more power to civil society? really achieve democratic autonomy in the way (...)
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  49. Mark Coeckelbergh (2013). Pervasion of What? Techno–Human Ecologies and Their Ubiquitous Spirits. AI and Society 28 (1):55-63.score: 24.0
    Are the robots coming? Is the singularity near? Will we be dominated by technology? The usual response to ethical issues raised by pervasive and ubiquitous technologies assumes a philosophical anthropology centered on existential autonomy and agency, a dualistic ontology separating humans from technology and the natural from the artificial, and a post-monotheistic dualist and creational spirituality. This paper explores an alternative, less modern vision of the “technological” future based on different assumptions: a “deep relational” view of human being and (...)
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  50. Andy Clark & Josefa Toribio, Commentary on J.K O'Regan and A Noe: A Sensorimotor Account of Vision and Visual Consciousness.score: 24.0
    O'Regan and Noe present a wonderfully detailed and comprehensive defense of a position whose broad outline we absolutely and unreservedly endorse. They are right, it seems to us, to stress the intimacy of conscious content and embodied action, and to counter the idea of a Grand Illusion with the image of an agent genuinely in touch, via active exploration, with the rich and varied visual scene. This is an enormously impressive achievement, and we hope that the comments that follow (...)
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