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  1. Adam Kadlac (forthcoming). Does It Matter Whether We Do Wrong? Philosophical Studies:1-20.
    This paper examines the relationship between monadic and bipolar forms of normativity. As the distinction is usually drawn, monadic normativity concerns whether a given action is right or wrong while bipolar normativity concerns who, if anyone, is wronged in any putative instance of wrongdoing. My central thesis is that in the moral realm, we do well to discard the notion of monadic normativity altogether and focus instead on the contours and limits of bipolar normativity. For by placing greater weight on (...)
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  2. Adam Kadlac (forthcoming). The Virtue of Hope. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice:1-18.
    I argue that hope is a virtue insofar as it (1) leads to a more realistic view of the future than dispositions like optimism and pessimism, (2) promotes courage, and (3) encourages an important kind of solidarity with others. In light of this proposal, I consider the relationship between hope and our beliefs about what is good as well as the conditions under which hope may fail to be a virtue.
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  3. Adam Kadlac (2014). Flouting the Demands of Justice? Physician Participation in Executions. Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 39 (5):505-522.
    Those who argue against physician participation in state mandated executions tend to bracket the question of whether the death penalty should be abolished. I argue that these issues cannot be neatly separated. On the one hand, if justice demands that some criminals be executed for their crimes, then there can be no ethical or moral barrier to the participation of physicians in the execution process. On the other hand, I contend that the testimony and expertise of the medical community is (...)
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  4. Adam Kadlac (2014). Sincerity, Solidarity, and Deliberative Commitment. Southern Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):139-162.
    Two challenges have lately been posed to the importance of sincerity for our public discourse. On the one hand, it has been suggested that because sincerity is so difficult to identify, a preoccupation with the inner lives of others distracts us from the substance of what people say. On the other hand, some worry that making sincere statements can sometimes undermine the very deliberation that advocates of sincerity are so concerned to protect. In light of these challenges, I attempt to (...)
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  5. Adam Kadlac (2013). Christian Smith, What is a Person? Rethinking Humanity, Social Life, and the Moral Good From the Person Up (Chicago, IL: University of Chicago Press, 2010), 518 Pp. ISBN: 0226765911. £ 26.00 (Hbk.). [REVIEW] Journal of Moral Philosophy 10 (4):555-557.
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  6. Adam Kadlac (2013). Empiricism and Moral Status. Social Theory and Practice 39 (3):397-421.
    Many inquiries into the scope of moral value try to adopt an impersonal perspective on the world—that is, a perspective that abstracts away from the particularities of our personal experience and attempts to view the world from no place within it. In contrast to this approach, I argue that our investigation into the nature and scope of moral value should proceed from a more thoroughly personal standpoint by taking seriously our moral experience and the relational possibilities that obtain among various (...)
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  7. Adam Kadlac (2012). Irreplaceability and Identity. Social Theory and Practice 38 (1):33-54.
    There is a puzzle about how we might sensibly love someone as the particular person she is despite changes in that person’s characteristics that are sometimes radical. In light of this puzzle, I argue that our most intimate relationships are centered around historical relational properties that serve two important functions. On the one hand, they render individuals irreplaceable to us. On the other, they constitute individuals as the particular persons they are. If this account is plausible, then to love another (...)
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  8. Adam Kadlac (2011). The Importance of Arguing as We Believe. Public Affairs Quarterly 25 (1):63-80.
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  9. Adam Kadlac (2010). Humanizing Personhood. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):421 - 437.
    This paper explores the debate between personists, who argue that the concept of a person if of central importance for moral thought, and personists, who argue that the concept of a human being is of greater moral significance. On the one hand, it argues that normative naturalism, the most ambitious defense of the humanist position, fails to identify moral standards with standards of human behavior and thereby fails to undermine the moral significance of personhood. At the same time, it contends (...)
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  10. Adam Kadlac (2010). The Constitution of Agency – Christine Korsgaard. [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 60 (239):427-429.
  11. Adam Kadlac (2009). What's so Bad About Politicizing? Public Affairs Quarterly 23 (3):227-244.
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  12. Adam Kadlac (2007). Acceptance, Belief, and Descartes's Provisional Morality. Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 10 (1):35 - 52.
    This paper explores Descartes’s work with an eye towards abiding issues in moral epistemology. In so doing, I focus on the role played by the so-called provisional morality that surfaces in “Discourse on the Method”. What I argue is that despite the tenuousness with which it seems to be held, Descartes remained committed to the truth of this morality even in the midst of his most strenuous philosophical reflections. Put in the contemporary epistemological terms which provide the context of my (...)
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