10 found
Sort by:
See also:
Profile: Adam Konopka (DePaul University)
  1. Adam Konopka (2013). Public, Ecological and Normative Goods: The Case of Deepwater Horizon. Ethics, Policy and Environment 16 (2):188 - 207.
    This paper identifies the duty to care for the public interest in the commonly valued ecological goods of the Gulf as one of the basic essential features of the moral significance of the federal policies that govern the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill. I argue that the Clean Water Act and the Oil Protection Act implicitly provide for a communitarian interpretation of the public and ecological goods of this event that warrants a virtue ethical account of normativity that is ultimately expressed (...)
    No categories
    Direct download (3 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  2. Adam Konopka (2012). The Environed Body. Studia Phaenomenologica 12:289-307.
    This article is an attempt to retrieve phenomenological resources for the purposes of identifying and clarifying the lived situation of embodiment in an environing world (Umwelt). Drawn primarily from Husserlian resources, it identifies several essential perceptual features of the operative intentionality of environed embodiment. Through an engagement with Husserl’s analyses of instinctual experience, I identify an essential feature of environed embodiment: the principle of association governing the nexus among objects in an environing world that are animated toward an instrumental resolution (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  3. Adam Konopka (2010). Merleau-Ponty's Philosophy of Nature. Environmental Philosophy 7 (1):90-93.
  4. Adam Konopka (2010). The Worldhood of the Perceptual Environing World. In Pol Vandevelde & Sebastian Luft (eds.), Epistemology, Archaeology, Ethics: Current Investigations of Husserl's Corpus. Continuum.
  5. Adam Konopka (2009). Ecological Goods That Obligate. Environmental Ethics 31 (3):245-262.
    Phenomenological resources can be used to develop a nonanthropocentric theory of ecological values that gives rise to an obligation for moral agents. There is logical space in Edmund Husserl’s early theory of value that is inclusive of nonhuman animals and vegetation as members of a life community (Lebensgemeinschaft) possessing ecological characteristics. Within this legal space is a characterization of ecological obligation that is not tied to any single moral law, as it is in deontological ethics and utilitarianism, but founded on (...)
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  6. Adam Konopka (2009). Onto-Ethologies. International Philosophical Quarterly 49 (2):278-280.
    No categories
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  7. Adam Konopka (2009). The "Inversions" of Intentionality in Levinas and the Later Heidegger. Phaenex 4 (1):146-162.
    This essay brings together the inversion of intentionality in Levinas and the later Heidegger. In light of the later Heidegger’s traversal of the intentional horizon through the articulation of the withdrawal of Ereignis , it argues that the earlier Levinasian critique of the understanding proper to Heideggerian ontology is assuaged. In both Levinas and the post- Kehre Heidegger, Husserlian intentionality is expanded beyond the so called representational features that were criticized by both post-Husserlian figures.
    Direct download (13 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  8. Adam Konopka (2009). The Role of Umwelt in Husserl's Aufbau and Abbau of the Natur/Geist Distinction. Human Studies 32 (3):313 - 333.
    In this essay I argue that Husserl’s development of the nineteenth century Natur/Geist distinction is grounded in the intentional correlate between the pre-theoretical natural attitude and environing world ( Umwelt ). By reconsidering the Natur/Geist distinction through its historical context in the nineteenth century debate between Wilhelm Dilthey and the Neo-Kantians from the Baden or Southwest school, it is possible to understand more clearly Husserl’s appropriations and novel contributions. One of Husserl’s contributions lies in his rigorous thematization and clarification of (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  9. Adam Konopka (2008). A Renewal of Husserl's Critique of Naturalism. Environmental Philosophy 5 (1):37-59.
    This essay argues that phenomenology is uniquely suited to critique naturalism without lapsing into a romantic, anti-scientific, or dystopian view of modern science. This argument situates Husserl’s retrieval of the environmental relation in the Vienna Lecture between two alternative tendencies in contemporary ecological phenomenology: 1) the rejection of or indifference to the positive sciences, and 2) the adoption of naturalism in phenomenological methodology. On the one hand, the claim is that the phenomenological return to the environment should not imply a (...)
    Direct download (5 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation  
  10. Adam Konopka (2006). French Hegel: From Surrealism to Postmodernism, by Bruce Baugh. The Owl of Minerva 38 (1/2):158-166.
    Direct download (4 more)  
     
    My bibliography  
     
    Export citation