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Adam Morton [146]Adam David Morton [5]
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Profile: Adam Morton (University of British Columbia)
  1. Adam Morton, Searching for Logic.
    This is the PRINT VERSION of the text. There is also an e-version available on the web-site and the moodle site for the course. It has colours and more pictures. You do not have to buy this print version, if you prefer to read the e-version on screen, or print for yourself from the print version files also available on the web. But you do need to have one version or the other. Some may prefer to have both. When I (...)
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  2. Adam Morton, Accomplishment.
    The concepts of knowledge and of accomplishment have many similarities. In fact they are duals, in a sense that I explain. Similar issues arise about both of them, deriving from the functions they serve in everyday evaluation of inquiry and action.
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  3. Adam Morton, Three Moral Hints.
    A vegetarian argument: We should avoid meat not because we think that animals are like us but because most animals are very different from humans. Most animals are not persons: they think and feel but do not have thoughts and feelings about their thoughts and feelings. With persons the obligation to prevent suffering, and indeed the obligation to preserve life, can be over-ridden by mutual agreement. I'll risk my life and welfare to protect your children if you do the same (...)
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  4. Adam Morton (forthcoming). Shared Knowledge From Individual Vice: The Role of Unworthy Epistemic Emotions. Philosophical Inquiries.
    This paper begins with a discussion the role of less-than-admirable epistemic emotions in our respectable, indeed admirable inquiries: nosiness, obsessiveness, wishful thinking, denial, partisanship. The explanation for their desirable effect is Mandevillian: because of the division of epistemic labour individual epistemic vices can lead to shared knowledge. In fact it is sometimes essential to it.
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  5. Amélie Oksenberg Rorty & Adam Morton (forthcoming). Appendix: Review of" The Many Faces of Evil: Historical Perspectives". [REVIEW] The Monist.
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  6. Adam Morton (2014). Skookumchuck, Kiidk'yaas, Gibbard: Normativity, Meaning, and Idealization (Critical Notice of Allan Gibbard Meaning and Normativity). Canadian Journal of Philosophy 44.
    Skookumchuck, Kiidk'yaas, Gibbard: normativity, meaning, and idealization (critical notice of Allan Gibbard Meaning and Normativity). . ???aop.label???
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  7. Adam Morton (2013). Emotion and Imagination. Polity.
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  8. Adam Morton (2013). Imaginary Emotions. The Monist 96 (4):505-516.
    I give grounds for taking seriously the possibility that some of the emotions we ascribe do not exist. I build on the premise that the experience of imagining an emotion resembles that of having one. First a person imagines having an emotion. This is much like an emotion, so the person takes herself to be having the emotion that she imagines, and acts or expects a disposition to act accordingly. The view sketched here contrasts possibly impossible emotions such as disembodied (...)
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  9. Adam Morton (2013). Reasoning: A Social Picture. By Anthony Simon Laden. (Oxford UP, 2012. Pp. 283. Price £33.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):843-846.
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  10. Adam Morton (2013). Reasoning: A Social Picture. Philosophical Quarterly 63 (253):843-846.
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  11. Adam David Morton (2013). The Limits of Sociological Marxism? Historical Materialism 21 (1):129-158.
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  12. Adam Morton (2012). Accomplishing Accomplishment. Acta Analytica 27 (1):1-8.
    The concepts of knowledge and accomplishment are duals. There are many parallels between them. In this paper I discuss the "AA" thesis, which is dual to the well known KK thesis. The KK thesis claims that if someone knows something, then she knows that she knows it. This is generally thought to be false, and there are powerful reasons for rejecting it. The AA thesis claims that if someone accomplishes something, then she accomplishes that she accomplishes it. I argue that (...)
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  13. Adam Morton (2012). Bounded Thinking: Intellectual Virtues for Limited Agents. Oup Oxford.
    Adam Morton offers a new account of the virtues of limitation management: intellectual virtues of adapting to the fact that we cannot solve many of the problems that we can describe. He argues that the best response to many problems depends not on the most rationally promising solution, but on the most likely route to success.
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  14. Adam Morton (2012). Contrastive Knowledge. In Martijn Blaauw (ed.), Contrastivism in Philosophy: New Perspectives. Routledge. 74-89.
    The claim of this paper is that the everyday functions of knowledge make most sense if we see knowledge as contrastive. That is, we can best understand how the concept does what it does by thinking in terms of a relation “a knows that p rather than q.” There is always a contrast with an alternative. Contrastive interpretations of knowledge, and objections to them, have become fairly common in recent philosophy. The version defended here is fairly mild in that there (...)
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  15. Adam Morton (2012). Emotional Truth. By Ronald de Sousa. (Oxford UP, 2011. Pp. Xviii + 391. Price £38.00.). [REVIEW] Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):220-222.
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  16. Adam Morton (2011). Conventional Norms of Reasoning. Dialogue 50 (02):247-260.
    I describe conventions not of correct reasoning but of giving and taking advice about reasoning. This article is asn anticipation of part of the first chapter of my forthcoming *Bounded Thinking*, OUP 2012.
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  17. Adam Morton (2011). Empathy for the Devil. In Amy Coplan & Peter Goldie (eds.), Empathy: Philosophical and Psychological Perspectives. Oxford University Press. 318.
    I argue that there is a blinkering effect to decency. Being a morally sensitive person, and having internalized a code of behavior that restricts the range of actions that one takes as live options for oneself, constrains one’s imagination. It becomes harder to identify imaginatively with mportant parts of human possibility. In particular—the part of the claim that I will argue for in this chapter—it limits one’s capacity to empathize with those who perform atrocious acts. They become alien to one. (...)
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  18. Adam Morton (2011). Review of Sosa Knowing Full Well. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 23.
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  19. Andreas Bieler & Adam David Morton (2010). 14 Post-Structuralism and the Randomisation of History. In Cerwyn Moore & Chris Farrands (eds.), International Relations Theory and Philosophy: Interpretive Dialogues. Routledge. 157.
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  20. Adam Morton (2010). Central and Marginal Forgiveness: Comments on Charles Griswold's Forgiveness; a Philosophical Exploration. Philosophia 38 (3):439-444.
    I discuss Charles Griswold’s Forgiveness, arguing that he classifies as marginal many cases that we normally count as forgiveness. Moreover the phenomenon that he calls “forgiveness at its best” may include some awful aspects of human nature. Nevertheless, there are central and important aspects of the concept that are captured by his discussion.
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  21. Adam Morton (2010). Epistemic Emotions. In Peter Goldie (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Emotion. Oxford University Press. 385--399.
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  22. Adam Morton (2010). Feelings of Being: Phenomenology, Psychiatry and the Sense of Reality – Matthew Ratcliffe. Philosophical Quarterly 60 (240):661-662.
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  23. Adam Morton (2010). Human Bounds: Rationality for Our Species. Synthese 176 (1):5 - 21.
    Is there such a thing as bounded rationality? I first try to make sense of the question, and then to suggest which of the disambiguated versions might have answers. We need an account of bounded rationality that takes account of detailed contingent facts about the ways in which human beings fail to perform as we might ideally want to. But we should not think in terms of rules or norms which define good responses to an individual's limitations, but rather in (...)
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  24. Adam Morton (2010). Imagining Evil. Les Ateliers de l'Éthique / the Ethics Forum 5 (1):26-33.
    It is in a way easier to imagine evil actions than we often suppose, but what it is thus relatively easy to do is not what we want to understand about evil. To argue for this conclusion I distinguish between imagining why someone did something and imagining how they could have done it, and I try to grasp partial understanding, in part by distinguishing different imaginative perspectives we can have on an act. When we do this we see an often (...)
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  25. Adam Morton (2009). Folk Psychology. In Brian McLaughlin, Ansgar Beckermann & Sven Walter (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Mind. Oup Oxford.
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  26. Adam Morton (2009). From Tracking Relations to Propositional Attitudes. European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 5 (2):7-18.
    I explore the possibility that propositional attitudes are not basic in folk psychology, and that what we really ascribe to people are relations to individuals, those that the apparently propositional contents of beliefs, desires, and other states concern. In particular, the relation between a state and the individuals that it tracks shows how ascription of propositional attitudes could grow out of ascription of relations between people and objects.
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  27. Adam Morton (2009). Good Citizens and Moral Heroes. In Pedro Alexis Tabensky (ed.), The Positive Function of Evil. Palgrave Macmillan.
    Scale matters in morality, so that different factors occupy us at high and low scales. Different people are needed to be good neighbours in everyday life and moral heroes in crises. There is no reason to believe that the same traits are required for both. So there is no such thing as the all-round good person.
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  28. Adam Morton (2009). Rediscovering Empathy: Agency, Folk Psychology, and the Human Sciences – Karsten R. Stueber. Philosophical Quarterly 59 (237):754-756.
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  29. Antti Karjalainen & Adam Morton (2008). Contrastivity and Indistinguishability. Social Epistemology 22 (3):271-280.
    We give a general description of a class of contrastive constructions, intended to capture what is common to contrastive knowledge, belief, hope, fear, understanding and other cases where one expresses a propositional attitude in terms of “rather than”. The crucial element is the agent's incapacity to distinguish some possibilities from others. Contrastivity requires a course-graining of the set of possible worlds. As a result, contrastivity will usually cut across logical consequence, so that an agent can have an attitude to p (...)
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  30. Adam Morton (2008). The Roots of Evil. [REVIEW] Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 76 (2):495–496.
    a review of John Kekes' *The Roots of Evil*. I express admiration for the aims and scope of the book, and disagree with some of Kekes' accounts of some historical cases.
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  31. Adam Morton & Antti Karjalainen (2008). Contrastivity and Indistinguishability. Social Epistemology 22 (3):271 – 280.
    We give a general description of a class of contrastive constructions, intended to capture what is common to contrastive knowledge, belief, hope, fear, understanding and other cases where one expresses a propositional attitude in terms of “rather than”. The crucial element is the agent's incapacity to distinguish some possibilities from others. Contrastivity requires a course-graining of the set of possible worlds. As a result, contrastivity will usually cut across logical consequence, so that an agent can have an attitude to p (...)
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  32. Adam Morton (2007). Folk Psychology Does Not Exist. In. In Daniel D. Hutto & Matthew Ratcliffe (eds.), Folk Psychology Re-Assessed. Kluwer/Springer Press. 211--221.
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  33. Adam Morton (2007). Great Expectations. In Tim Lewens (ed.), Risk: Philosophical Perspectives. Routledge.
    I distinguish between risks in which most people will do badly from those in which few will, though some will do very badly.
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  34. Adam David Morton (2007). Spaces of Global Capitalism: Towards a Theory of Uneven Geographical Development. Contemporary Political Theory 6 (3):381.
  35. Adam Morton (2006). The Future for Philosophy - Edited by Brian Leiter. Philosophical Books 47 (4):366-368.
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  36. Adam Morton (2006). But Are They Right? The Prospects for Empirical Conceptology. Journal of Cognition and Culture 6:193-197.
    This is exciting stuff. Philosophers have long explored the structure of human concepts from the inside, by manipulating their skills as users of those concepts. And since Quine most reasonable philosophers have accepted that the structure is a contingent matter – we or not too different creatures could have thought differently – which in principle can be..
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  37. Adam Morton (2006). Finding the Corkscrew. Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 37 (1):114-117.
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  38. Adam Morton (2006). . Imagination and Misimagination. In Shaun Nichols (ed.), The Architecture of the Imagination: New Essays on Pretence, Possibility, and Fiction. Clarendon Press.
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  39. Adam Morton (2006). Knowing What to Think About: When Epistemology Meets the Theory of Choice. In Stephen Cade Hetherington (ed.), Epistemology Futures. Oxford University Press. 111--30.
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  40. Adam Morton (2006). Moral Incompetence. In T. . D. . J. Chappell (ed.), Values and Virtues: Aristotelianism in Contemporary Ethics. Oxford University Press.
    Moral high-performers have characteristic faults. I describe difficulties in handling moral problems that arise not out of faulty intentions or defective values but because the agents underestimate the complexity of the situation.
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  41. Adam Morton (2006). Review: If. [REVIEW] Mind 115 (458):409-412.
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  42. Andreas Bieler & Adam David Morton (2005). Introduction: International Relations as Political Theory. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (4):383-393.
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  43. Adam Morton (2005). Atrocity, Banality, Self-Deception. Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):257-259.
  44. Adam Morton (2005). Review of Paul Weirich, Realistic Decision Theory: Rules for Nonideal Agents in Nonideal Circumstances. [REVIEW] Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 2005 (8).
  45. Adam David Morton (2005). A Double Reading of Gramsci: Beyond the Logic of Contingency. Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 8 (4):439-453.
    Abstract In criticising the Italian idealist philosopher Benedetto Croce ? described by Eric Hobsbawm as the first ?post?Marxist? ? Antonio Gramsci elaborated a distinct theory of history. For Gramsci, philosophers such as Croce developed a subjective account of history based on the progression of philosophical thought rather than problems posed by historical development. This essay develops a ?double reading? of Gramsci. First, it presents an overview of a dominant post?Marxist reading of Gramsci?s approach to historical materialism, which constructs a closed (...)
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  46. Adam Morton (2004). As crenças e as suas qualidades. Crítica.
    this seems to be an unauthorized translation from an early chapter of *A Guide through the Theory of Knowledge*.
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  47. Adam Morton (2004). Against the Ramsey Test. Analysis 64 (4):294–299.
  48. Adam Morton (2004). Ensinar a filosofar. Crítica.
    this seems to be an unauthorized translation from the introduction to *Philosophy in Practice*.
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  49. Adam Morton (2004). Epistemic Virtues, Metavirtues, and Computational Complexity. Noûs 38 (3):481–502.
    I argue that considerations about computational complexity show that all finite agents need characteristics like those that have been called epistemic virtues. The necessity of these virtues follows in part from the nonexistence of shortcuts, or efficient ways of finding shortcuts, to cognitively expensive routines. It follows that agents must possess the capacities – metavirtues –of developing in advance the cognitive virtues they will need when time and memory are at a premium.
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